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Each year, the TASH Conference strengthens the disability field by connecting attendees to innovative information and resources, facilitating connections between stakeholders within the disability movement, and helping attendees reignite their passion for an inclusive world. This year’s conference theme, “Gateway to Equity,” explores inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs, in living a fair, just, and balanced life. Return to TASH website.

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Tuesday, November 29
 

12:00pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Board Meeting

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →

Tuesday November 29, 2016 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Midway Suites IV 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103
 
Wednesday, November 30
 

7:30am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH Conference attendees. The room is located near the atrium (glass floor) area of the hotel.

Wednesday November 30, 2016 7:30am - 7:30pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

8:15am

Where the Rubber Hits the Road: Building a Dynamic, First Rate Infrastructure to Support State Employment 1st Efforts
Limited Capacity seats available

Strategic investments in developing the capacity of front-line direct support professionals and in testing innovative tactics for supporting individuals in competitive integrated employment is critical to the success of state Employment First efforts.  Both the Administration on Community Living and the Office on Disability Employment Policy have invested heavily in support state E1st systems change efforts in recent years.  This pre-conference session will focus on reviewing the challenges that states are facing in building a first-rate direct support professional workforce within an E1st framework, and to highlight strategies and models that states have successfully implemented to build and sustain the capacity of their front-line employment support workforce to support individuals with disabilities achieve competitive, integrated employment.

Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. To identify Federal and state resources that can be utilized to build the capacity of front line direct support professionals and providers to bring to scale effective practices that lead to competitive, integrated employment (CIE).
  2. To discuss the learnings from two Federally-funded state E1st systems change initiatives -- ODEP's Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and ACL's Partnerships in Integrated Employment -- regarding strategies for bringing to scale effective practices that foster and promote CIE.  
  3. To acquire and develop new strategies and approaches in four key areas (customized employment, individualized supported employment, using technology as an equalizer and employer engagement) to developing staff and programs that are focused on supporting individuals with disabilities achieve and sustain CIE. 

Agenda

8:15-8:35 a.m.            Welcome & Overview

  • ODEP/ACL’s investments, collaboration, and unified commitment to Employment First systems change efforts.
  • Objectives for the Day
  • Expectations of Participants (ask the group, pick 2-3 participants to respond)

 

8:35-9:05 a.m.            Person-Centered Planning and Personalized Service Delivery –

Strategies That Move People from Programs Into REAL LIFE!

Gail Fanjoy, KFI (Maine)

 

9:05-9:35 a.m.            Creating a Successful Employment Team:  

Dynamic Program and Staff Development

Rachel Pollock, Job Path, Inc. (New York)

 

9:35-10:15 a.m.          Leveling the Playing Field thru Person-Centered Technology

Accommodations 

                                    Jennifer White, Able Opportunities (Washington State)

 

10:15-10:30 a.m.        Applying Promising Practices to Our Realities Back Home: 

Interactive Small Group Discussion

  • Have you attempted to use any of these strategies in your professional/personal work in this field thus far?  If not, what do you think would be the most feasible way to get started?
  • Based on the concepts discussed in the morning, where do you see the greatest opportunities to adopt some of these practices into your ongoing work?  What do you think might be the greatest barriers to overcome?

 

10:30-11:00 a.m.        Field perspective: Employment First Systems Change in Action

                                    Julie Christensen, Iowa’s University Center for Excellence on Disabilities

                                    (Formerly NY State Lead on EFSLMP & PIE Partnerships)

 

11:00-11:30 a.m.        Interactive Q&A and Wrap-Up



 

Speakers
avatar for Julie Christensen

Julie Christensen

Associate Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (IA UCEDD)
Julie J. Christensen, LMSW, PhD, is the Associate Director of the Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen's background... Read More →
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

Executive Director, KFI
2016 TASH Award Winner (Barbara R. Trader Leadership Award)Gail Fanjoy is CEO of KFI (Katahdin Friends, Inc.), an agency which provides supports for people with disabilities in the areas of community employment, supported living, and community life engagement in Maine.  Having worked for KFI since 1976 (40 years!), she has been a leader in the revolutionary shift in service delivery away from sheltered and segregated services to customized... Read More →



Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:15am - 11:30am
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

TASH Doctoral Students and Beginning Special Education Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This Wednesday session is meant for you! Come meet each other and nationally-recognized professors and researchers with successful records as college and university faculty who are willing to share their strategies with you. The groups will discuss the following topics.

Agenda:

8:20- 8:50 AM

Establishing a Professional Identity

Vicki Knight, Julie Thompson
Establishing a professional identity and getting through a doctoral program; negotiating to have experiences specifically related to severe disabilities & maximizing collaboration with seasoned faculty nationally; surviving when sole low incidence faculty member; begin to establish network between participants and presenters for specific tasks/activities. 


8:50- 9:50 AM

Grants and External Funding

Mary Morningstar, Pam Mims
Grantsmanship; seeking external funding for research, personnel preparation, systems change efforts, conference attendance; “Centers” versus projects; early career funding.

Teacher Preparation
Donna Lehr, Stacy Dymond
Preservice teacher preparation program development; constructing and implementing effective courses & a course sequence.


9:50 -10:50 AM

Developing and Sustaining a Research Agenda
Fred Spooner, Vicki Knight


10:50-11:50 AM

Service and Professional Development

Jacki Anderson
Interfacing of “service” & professional development activities (i.e., workshops; technical assistance) for building a community of services & support network that supports effective personnel prep. 

Publishing
Susan Copeland, Marty Agran, Fred Spooner, Stacy Dymond
Publishing articles in RPSD (& other journals), chapters, & books.


11:50 AM-12:20 PM

Promotion and Tenure
Fredda Brown, Fred Spooner
Promotion and tenure issues; juggling all the required and desired tasks and activities for your professional identity (e.g., publish or perish; teaching or service in the community); packaging yourself for open faculty positions (i.e., beyond severe disabilities).

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois
avatar for Pamela Mims

Pamela Mims

Associate Professor, East Tennessee State University
Systematic Instructional, Access to the General Education Curriculum, Alignment, ABA
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:20am - 12:20pm
Midway Suites III & IV

8:20am

Initiative Implementation for Improved Transition Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite the investment of considerable federal and state resources, employment of transition aged youth is well below that of their nondisabled peers. Youth with disabilities are significantly less likely to be employed after leaving high school compared to their nondisabled peers (57% to 66%) (Newman et al., 2009).

The field, and more importantly people with I/DD, would benefit greatly if stakeholders would move toward change management solutions. Instead of merely providing analysis of what is and what is not working, stakeholders need to become implementation champions to ensure employment and higher education are the two options for young people with disabilities. 

The purpose of this 8-hour workshop is to highlight initiatives that can contribute to improved transition outcomes. It will discuss family supports, post secondary education, young self-advocate development, and capacity building for sustainable and effective change. 

This workshop is ideal for State agency leaders and senior staff – VR, ED, DDS, DDC; educators, education leaders, VR practitioners, and adult service professionals; parents and family Members; advocates, self advocates and attorneys.

Who Should Attend?

  • State agency leaders and senior staff (Education, VR, DD Council, Disability Rights and more)

  • Educators, Education Leaders and Resource Professionals

  • Adult Service Professionals

  • Attorneys and Advocates

  • Parents and Family Members

  • Self-Advocates



Tentative Agenda (Subject to Change)

8:10AM-8:20AM- Welcome Remarks Facilitated by TBA

8:20-9:50 AM  Using the LifeCourse Framework to Engage Families and Transform Systems. Susan Bird, Erin Leveton and Emma Shouse

9:50-11:20 AM Community Conversations: Empowering Communities to Improve Transition Outcomes for Youth with Severe Disabilities. Jenifer Bumble

11:20 AM-12:00 PM Break 

12:00-1:30 PM Family Support in Post-secondary Education: Rethinking Efforts to Ground the Helicopter Parents. Grace L. Francis, Elizabeth Fuchs, and  Andrew J. Kliethermes 

1:30-3:00  On the Rise: Helping Young Advocates Grow (and Growing in the Process)
 Daniel Mellenthin, Josie Badger, Cara Liebewitz, and Derek Wetherall 

3:00-3:15 Where do we go from here. Presenters and audience engage in conversation

Speakers
avatar for Susan Bird

Susan Bird

Missouri Family to Family
LifeCourse Framework, Supporting Families across the life span
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Mellenthin

Daniel Mellenthin

Tri-County Advocacy Specialist, Resource and Product Coordinator, DMH Dept of DD STL Regional Office, SPAN-RAISE Project
Daniel Mellenthin, MS, CRC | Daniel serves as Tri-County Advocacy Specialist for DMH St Louis Regional Office, providing individual, family, agency, and systemic advocacy and skill-building across St Louis City, Jefferson County, and St Charles County. He also works as SPAN (Statewide Parent Advocacy Network) Project and Resource Coordinator, leading workgroups for resource and product development, managing website and social media productions... Read More →



Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:20am - 3:15pm
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Real Inclusive Education Through Improved Communication & Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

Throughout its history, TASH has been at the forefront of disability rights advocacy and has been a pioneer on key issues impacting equity, opportunity and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. This how-to workshop will feature strategies and supports that participants can use to establish inclusive education environments favorable to all students, including those with significant disabilities. 

Tentative Agenda:

8:20-10:20 AM Common Core and Assessment. Mara Gonzalez, Kathy Gee

10:20 AM-12:20 PM Designing and Implementing Visual/Object Schedules and Calendars to Support Full-Inclusion. David A. Lojkovic, Jugnu P. Agrawal

12:20-1:00 Break

1:00 3:00 PM Bridging the Gap. Laurie Pachl, Patti McVay

3:00-3:30 PM Participants and attendees discuss how change can be replicated. 

Speakers
avatar for David Lojkovic

David Lojkovic

Educational Specialist, Adapted Curriculum, Fairfax County Public Schools
Dr. David Lojkovic's research areas include severe/profound intellectual disabilities, multiple disabilities, deaf-blindness, transition, and early childhood special education.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:20am - 3:30pm
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:30am

Building a grassroot movement for the second wave of the disability rights movement - taking strong advocates and making organizers
Limited Capacity seats available

In St. Louis we are working to build what my team has called the second wave of the disability rights movement, a movement of full inclusion.   This session will  focus on providing real-life tools to take a community leader from thinking as an activist/self advocate to thinking as an organizer. In the process the presenters will highlight real work that happened all over the greater St. Louis region by adopting the method that says "all people no matter what their background or perceived ability can A. be activists and B. become organizers".   This presentation will show what happens when you really put the power in the hands of the people. And will give practical tools to folks that aren't organizing in this way to begin to do so.





Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:30am - 10:20am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:30am

Real Life Outcomes: No Double Standards
Limited Capacity filling up

At KFI we believe that supports for people with intellectual disabilities must focus on full community participation; with opportunities to work, live and play alongside neighbors.  Yet people are most often confronted with cookie cutter services that focus on programs and goals that have little to do with real living.  The more significant challenges a person supported is identified with, the more mundane the goals and program tend to be.   For some unfathomable reason, it is thought a person with a disability must learn to say please and thank you, and tie their shoes before they can  earn a place in community.   Community, however, is not something we earn.  Instead of programs and goals focused on steps to get ready for life, KFI strives to identify meaningful outcomes to support each person to live a real life today.  This requires we accept that real life is messy, inconvenient, risky, and doesn’t always go as planned.  Meaningful outcomes set people on the path to their own dreams, with the expectation we walk that path with them.  And the measure is not the accomplishment of goals and programs, but living a good life.  Supporting people to engage in real community living starts with person centered planning, outcomes that matter, and a team that believes in the person and the community.  Progressive and proactive facilitation leads to a team that utilizes positive approaches  - to create opportunities for real homes, satisfying work, community life engagement, and belonging. 

At the end of the session, participants will be able to: Describe barriers to inclusion, systematic and cultural, for people with significant support needs. Discuss strategies to increase capacity for inclusion across the age span.  Describe how identifying person centered outcomes can lead to increased opportunities for inclusion.  Write meaningful/desired outcomes that move toward inclusion. Discuss how to support teams to do this work  

Speakers
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Hiring & Training Coordinator, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports for people to lead regular lives in their communities, no matter the barriers. Working in various capacities at KFI has afforded her the opportunity to do just that and... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community. She directs home support services for individuals living in their own homes in Southern Maine.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:30am - 11:30am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:30am

Faith and Inclusion: Embracing Inclusion for People with Disabilities in School and Community
Limited Capacity seats available

*Note: We have reached out to different private schools from other religions in the state in hopes to have a more diverse discussion. If they agree to participate, we will add them to the schedule. 

This inter-faith workshop will discuss practical approaches to ensure inclusion in all faith-based environments, including school, community, and congregation. Discussions will demonstrate how these approaches can work anywhere regardless of specific religion. 
This workshop is co-sponsored by Bethesda Lutheran Communities and by One-Classroom.

Who Should Attend?  
  • Religious leaders, Clergy, Congregation Leaders, Lay Leaders and Members
  • Parents and Family Members
  • Self-Advocates
  • Adult Service Providers
  • Educators
  • University/Divinity Students and Faculty
AGENDA

8:20- 9:10 AM In The Beginning: Catholic Theology, Catholic Social Teaching. This presentation is designed to equip attendees to be better advocates for inclusion in their faith communities. This module explores the theological principals the underpin our concepts of social justice and civil rights. However, advocacy in our faith communities is based on our relationship to Christ and we explore the life of Christ and the gospels and how His example directly inspires us. This session will build upon Christ’s example and these principals and explain Catholic Social Teaching as it applies to individuals with disabilities. We will also explore and learn from the advocacy of our leaders such as Pope Francis and Archbishop Carlson. Presenters: Tony Armitage, Director of One Classroom Foundation, and Michele Chronister, Co-chair Council for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, National Catholic Partnership on Disability.

9:10- 10:00 AM The Whole Family Matters. This presentation will explore how faith communities can learn to Be Sanctuary, Be In Fellowship, Create Places of Belonging and Move to Mutual Ministry through meaningful participation for the WHOLE family who experience developmental disability. Individuals, parents, siblings, grandparents and extended family all experience this journey differently. Explore how the journey of disability affects everyone in the family unit. Learn supports for each person who experiences the journey uniquely. Find tools to equip staff to minister with the whole family so they are not just surviving, but are thriving. Thriving includes using their gifts to fill a vital role in the spiritual life of the faith community. Presenter: Mona Fuerstenau, Director of Ministry Partnerships for Bethesda Lutheran Communities

10:00-10:10 AM Break
 

10:10 – 11:00 Advocacy, Change & Support: “FIRE Foundation” and “One Classroom” This presentation is designed to help the attendees better understand how to advocate and achieve change in their faith communities. Creating real, sustainable change in a faith community can be a complex and daunting endeavor. Two foundations dedicated to promoting and supporting inclusive education in their respective dioceses discuss their missions, organizational approach, and advice for promoting and supporting inclusive education. Presenters: Lynn Hire, Executive Director of FIRE Foundation & Tony Armitage, Director of One Classroom.

11:00-11:50AM Ending Marginalization by Disability. Explore how to become a person and place of welcome and belonging for people of all abilities. Discover how the intersection of faith and disability can reduce marginalization and increase community for people with disabilities. Everyone has unique gifts to bring to the table once they are invited, welcomed and valued in their participation. It begins with breaking down barriers and that begins with relationships. Presenter: Rev Josh Galgan, Western Division Director of Religious Life for Bethesda Lutheran Communities.

11:50AM-12:40PM Lunch Break on Your Own

12:40-1:30 All Are Welcome: Building the Capacity of Parochial and Faith-Based Schools to Serve the Needs of Students with Disabilities.  “All Are Welcome” is an initiative designed to support Catholic schools to develop innovative ways to meet the needs of all children within the Catholic school setting. This four-part process features professional development and direct support so that Catholic schools can develop innovative and sustainable programs to meet the needs of students. Learner Outcomes: Describe the essential components to implement an inclusive approach in Catholic Schools.; Identify critical elements for effective partnerships to support students. Presenter: Michael J. Boyle, Ph.D., Director of the Andrew M. Greeley Center for Catholic Education at Loyola University Chicago

1:30-2:20 Facilitating Natural Supports in Faith Communities. This session will explore the potential of faith communities as the ultimate community networking network! Identify entry points through shared interests and desires. Find practical ways to begin growing disability awareness within your faith community and move to experiencing meaningful participation, mutual ministry and life together with those with disabilities. Natural supports result when people are in relationship. Intentional engagement tools, models and best practices will be shared. Presenters: Mona Fuerstenau, Director of Ministry Partnerships for Bethesda Lutheran Communities, Rev Josh Galgan Western Division Director of Religious Life, Bethesda Lutheran Communities.

2:20-2:30 PM Break 

2:30-3:20 PM Case Study: Mary Queen Of Peace: From “No” to “Yes.” How one parish school became inclusive. Inclusion happens one student at a time, one family at a time, one school at a time. The purpose of this presentation is to help the attendees take real life obstacles and challenges, and how they were overcome and managed, back to their community. This presentation shares the example of how one parish school wrestled with the challenges of addressing inclusive education and eventually opened their doors to students with special needs. This presentation also explores the day to day challenges of managing change, implementation and training, and resource availability. Presenters: Nicolette Gibson, Director of Inclusive Education, Kansas City, St. Joseph Diocese & Amy Schroff, Principal at Mary Queen Of Peace School, Webster Groves, MO

*3:20-4:20 PM Islamic Private Education- Description and presenters TBA

*4:20- 5:20 PM Jewish Private Education-  Description and presenters TBA

5:20- 5:30 All Hands Talk- ALL presenters discuss lessons learned by Tony Armitage

Speakers
avatar for Tony Armitage

Tony Armitage

Director, One Classroom
One Classroom is a non-profit organization dedicated to creating inclusive educational opportunities for children with special needs. We believe every child deserves a Catholic education in their local parish school in full community with their peers. One Classroom creates awareness, promotes and supports inclusive education by providing funding, training, expert resources, sharing of best practices and connecting parents.
avatar for Michael Boyle

Michael Boyle

Director, Andrew M. Greeley Center for Catholic Education-Loyola University
Michael J. Boyle is the Director of the Andrew M. Greeley Center for Catholic Education at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Boyle has worked in education in a variety of settings and roles. As a school psychologist at both the high school and elementary levels, he worked with students across a broad range of areas of exceptionality. He has also served as a special education administrator in several public school districts. Additionally, Dr. Boyle... Read More →
avatar for Michele Chronister

Michele Chronister

co-chair Council for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, National Catholic Partnership on Disability
Michele is a wife, mother, and speaker & author advocating for individuals with special needs. Michelle has a Masters degree in theology from Notre Dame University and her books include “Handbook for Adaptive Catechesis” a guide for those in ministry for individuals with disabilities and other special needs, and “Taking the lift to Heaven” an ebook and practical introductory guide to ministry for those with special needs. Michele also... Read More →
avatar for Mona Fuerstenau

Mona Fuerstenau

Bethesda Lutheran Communities
Mona Fuerstenau is a longtime disability advocate passionate about communities of belonging, currently working primarily in faith communities. Her role with Bethesda Lutheran Communities as Director of Ministry Partnerships nationally led to the sponsorship and development of this Faith and Inclusion workshop at TASH 2016. Her 13 year career as a Speech Language Pathologist prior to becoming parent to two very diverse learners and being a... Read More →
avatar for Josh Galgan

Josh Galgan

Bethesda Lutheran Communities
Josh Galgan is the Western Division Director of Religious Life for Bethesda Lutheran Communities. In this role Josh leads a team of people in six different western states that work one on one with adults who have intellectual and developmental disabilities to determine their desired and needed faith supports and then to train on the implementation of those supports. In addition Josh and his team work to consult with and train local churches to... Read More →
avatar for Nicolette Gibson

Nicolette Gibson

Director of Inclusive Education, Kansas City - St. Joseph Catholic Schools
Nicolette is the Director of Inclusive Education for the Diocese of Kansas City - St. Joseph, MO. She began supporting Inclusion in this role in 2006. Since that time she has worked to support the inclusion of students with a wide range of disabilities and needs in their parish school. Catholic schools in the Kansas City - St. Joseph Diocese have been practicing Inclusive Education for close to 20 years. We believe that our learning... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Hire

Lynn Hire

executive director, FIRE Foundation
Lynn is the executive director of the FIRE Foundation, an organization founded in 1996 to support inclusion in Catholic schools in the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph in Missouri. She oversees all advocacy and fundraising initiatives for FIRE. Since its inception, FIRE has granted nearly $3.5 million to Catholic schools that embrace inclusive learning practices. Grants are used to pay salaries of special educators, para-professionals and to... Read More →
avatar for Amy Schroff

Amy Schroff

Principal, Mary Queen of Peace School
I am the principal of Mary Queen of Peace Catholic School in Webster Groves, MO. We are a preschool-grade 8 parish elementary school. We have embarked on the journey of inclusive education, welcoming students with Down syndrome and other special needs. I'll be co-presenting a session on how Catholic schools can say "yes" to inclusion. Although I'm not an expert. I am happy to share our story.



Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:30am - 5:30pm
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:00am

TASH Chapter Leadership Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH’s growing network of existing and developing chapters meet to share experiences, address challenges and build skills as leaders in grassroots advocacy. We will be exploring and developing action plans to address state and local issues. We will also be sharing information specific to chapter needs/interests. Individuals interested in starting a chapter in their state/region/province are welcome to attend.

Agenda: TBD

Speakers
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


Wednesday November 30, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:00pm

Let's Play Together: Building Educational Games in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Schools are beginning to implement games-based learning opportunities into the classroom setting. Through games, students are connecting meaningful experiences to core material, thereby creating an academic dialogue unlike any previously envisioned. The uptick in educational games affords students with significant disabilities the opportunity to participate in more activities and demonstrate their knowledge of material in alternative ways. This workshop outlines ways teachers have utilized commercial and online games to benefit students of every ability. Workshop participants come away with a critical perspective on how to design an accessible curriculum around commercial games and educational apps. Further, how to utilize this curriculum in multiple settings. 

 In this workshop, participants will:  - Consider how games-based learning can support students with disabilities at home and school  - Consider ways educators can embed games-based learning into curriculum design - Discuss how play impacts the learning experience of students with significant disabilities 

Speakers
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:00pm

Employment Implementers, Solutions for Improved Employment Outcomes
Legislation affecting the employment of people with disabilities mandates states to implement systems change policies and practices to improve transition, post-secondary and competitive employment outcomes for individuals with I/DD. However, effective systems do not currently exist to support providers to deliver services in integrated models, to effectively move youth from school to work, and to engage employers in hiring people with disabilities. Further, individuals with I/DD have not historically had opportunities to exercise choice and self-determination, leading to very limited consideration of young adults’ interests, strengths, priorities, and abilities when exploring employment options. While many states are committed to improving outcomes for youth and young adults with I/DD, they do not possess the necessary knowledge, experience or capacity to facilitate systems change. 

The purpose of this 4.5-hour workshop is to highlight initiatives that can contribute to improved employment outcomes. Presenters will discuss: 
  • Capacity, 
  • WIOA Implementation,
  • Agency Transformation, and 
  • Advancing Employment First 
Who Should Attend?  
  • State agency leaders and senior staff (Education, VR, DD Council, Disability Rights and more)
  • Educators, Education Leaders and Resource Professionals
  • Adult Service Professionals
  • Attorneys and Advocates
  • Parents and Family Members
  • Self-Advocates
1:00-3:00 Employment Support That's The Ticket!  Elizabeth Jennings, Nancy Boutot, Jayme Pendergraft
3:00-4:50  Employers as Full Partners - Achieving Inclusive Employment through Pathways to Careers. Michael Callahan, Therese Fimian, Amy Stapley





Speakers
avatar for Michael Callahan

Michael Callahan

President, Marc Gold & Associates
Customized Employment, Discovery, Job Development, Systematic Instruction, consulting, certification, inclusive community planning


Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:00pm - 4:50pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:00pm

Are We Having a Mid-Life Crisis? State of the Art (and Science) of Life-Span Services 41 Years Later
Limited Capacity seats available

Last year TASH celebrated its 40th anniversary. At the conference time was spent celebrating this event. There was reflection about how much we have achieved in our field and what we still need to do. Specifically, a special colloquium on evidence-based practices took place. The proposed colloquium will continue this dialogue, but approach the topic with a specific research perspective. This colloquium will provide attendees with current information about the “state of practice” across selected areas (e. g, inclusion, customized employment; see below list of potential topics and presenters) Although there will be no set format, presenters may opt to share information about the research that has been conducted in a particular area, (i.e., what the findings have revealed, what further research is needed) or a discussion about the state of “practice” (i.e., how and to what extent are practices being implemented).   Given the fact that a variety of topical areas will be discussed, the colloquium will have a general appeal, but be of specific interest to researchers, graduate students, and, hopefully, government and policy makers. 





  • Introduction. Martin Agran



  • Supported Employment for The Most Disenfranchised  and Challenged:: From Church Basements to the Department of Justice------Where We Are and Where We Need to Go. Paul Wehman,



  • The State of Inclusive Education: Where Have We Been? What is our Future?  Mary Morningstar



  • Turning Dreams to Actions: Higher Education Trends for Students with Intellectual Disability. Molly Boyle



  • What We Know about Teaching Academic Skills to Students with Severe Disabilities. Fred Spooner



  • Evidence-Based Strategies for Students with Severe Challenging Behavior: What We know and What We Still Don't Know. Fredda Brown



  • Family Support. George Singer 



  • Our Last Civil Rights Battle: Ensuring the Voting Rights of People with Severe Disabilities. Martin Agran



  • Closing Comments (Implications for TASH) Ralph Edward, Lewis Jackson, Moderator







Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:00pm

A Race For Human Right: From Deinstitutionalization to Autonomy
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will reflects on past victories in the fight for deinstitutionalization to modern day solutions for Autnomy for people with disabilities. 

1:00 - 3:00 PM Autonomy and Equity: Rethinking Guardianship
Setting up guardianship or conserving a person with disabilities is demeaning, conflicts with current best practices, and prevents autonomy and equity.  The outcome for the person is devastating and stigmatizing.  We must rethink this common, but outdated practice and instead use alternatives and provide the supports, help and accommodations persons need to exercise choice, have their preferences honored and to participate in our communities as equal citizens. Dohn Hoyle   

3:00 - 3:50 PM A Family Journey to Autonomy.  Mother, Farza Rahman, son, Ahmad Rahman, and transition expert, Ali Deyoung, discuss Ahmad journey to autonomy. 

3:50-4:00 Break

4:00- 5:00 PM Pennhurst:  A Gateway To Historic Victories In Civil and Human Rights. 
Pennhurst, the infamous Pennsylvania institution closed in 1987, brought social equity and human rights to the forefront of disability policy, laws and litigation, as the epicenter of America's Disability Rights Movement. Using a series of thirteen beautifully illustrated panels, our presenters will tell the story about the human costs of the failed "institutional model of care" that prevailed across the nation and the world for most of the 20th century, with Pennhurst as the exemplar of why the segregation and dehumanization of intellectually disabled persons was so wrong. The Pennhurst Longitudinal Study, replicated many times over, proved scientifically that people are "better off" living in the community. Since past is often prologue, it's a story that needs to be repeated, reaching today's and tomorrow's generations so that we never do this again. James W. Conroy, Jean M. Searle, Ellen Tierney

5:00 PM Pennhurst Exhibit. At the end of this workshop attendees and presenters will head over to the Perhurts exhibit. 

 

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Academic Success Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Beyond Academics
Alison DeYoung is currently the Academic Success Coordinator at the University of North Carolina Greensboro in the Integrative Community Studies 4-year certificate program. Alison has been a disability rights advocate since 2006 when she began working in the field of education and transition during her undergraduate studies. In 2010, she graduated with a Master’s degree in Severe & Multiple Disabilities from the University of Arizona. Upon... Read More →
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan Mental Health Code to include person-centered planning and to eliminate the term mental retardation; was instrumental in the closure of specialized nursing homes for... Read More →
avatar for Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman

Student, Beyond Academics
Hi! My name is Ahmad Rahman. I am a senior at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in the Integrative Community Studies certificate program. I'm excited to attend the TASH 2016 conference and present my portfolio.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:20pm

Empowering All Families to Create Inclusive Neighborhood Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will confront barriers to inclusive neighborhood schools created by a lack of understanding of cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic diversity; early intervention practices that over-emphasize medically-based approaches; and flawed assumptions about students with disabilities. Participants will hear from parents from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds whose children have been successfully included, develop an inclusive educational and post-high school vision for their child/student, and learn strategies for enlisting diverse inclusive education allies in their own communities.

At the end of this worshop, participants will:

1. Use TASH inclusive education position statement to describe inclusion.
2. List the quality indicators of inclusive education.
3. Describe the impact of the medical model of disability on the educational programs of students with disabilities and inclusive education.
4. Increase knowledge of the barriers to inclusion faced by families of diverse cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic backgrounds.
5. Demonstrate knowledge of social justice- and research-based rationales for inclusive education
6. Develop an inclusive vision for a child/student with intensive support needs.
7. Develop a plan for enlisting allies to help advocate for inclusive neighborhood schools. 




 

Speakers
avatar for Barbara J. McKenzie

Barbara J. McKenzie

Chairperson, Ohio TASH
Barb McKenzie is an advocate, presenter, and organizer of gatherings about the importance of creating inclusive communities. The chair of Ohio TASH, she participates on International TASH’s Inclusive Education committee. Barb is the author of “Reflections of Erin – the Importance of Belonging, Relationships, and Learning with Each Other,” a collection of stories, observations, and images inspired by her daughter Erin’s life which... Read More →



Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:20pm - 5:20pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

CEEDAR Project Workshop, Promoting Improved Outcomes for All Students
Limited Capacity seats available

In this multi-part workshop sponsored by the CEEDAR (Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability and Reform) Center, participants will discuss the importance of educational reform to promote greater alignment between states and institutes of higher education around teacher and leader preparation. 

To begin, CEEDAR Director, Dr. Mary Brownell, will provide an overview of the national CEEDAR project and how its work is promoting improved outcomes for all students. Then, Dr. Elizabeth Kozleski and colleagues from around the country will highlight how special education faculty at various IHEs are collaborating with their general education colleagues to infuse general education teacher preparation with concepts, values, and skills for supporting students with significant support needs in general education classrooms.

Session participants will be given a variety of CEEDAR resources and time to engage in cross-institutional conversations around initiating and sustaining work in this area.

Speakers
MB

Mary Brownell

Dr. Mary Brownell is a Professor of Special Education at the University of Florida. She is also the CEEDAR Center Project Director. CEEDAR stands for “Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability and Reform.” CEEDAR helps states and institutes of higher education reform their teacher and leader preparation programs, revise licensure standards to align with reforms, refine personnel evaluation systems, and realign policy... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:29pm

About TASH Talks
Limited Capacity seats available

Hosted by: TBA

TASH Talks are informal discussions regarding a topic that are not meant to provide answers, but rather evoke creative thinking about an issue (e.g. personal experience, story, point of view).The presentations are chosen at random from the list below.  And, each presenter delivers his/her talk around a particular topic for 8-10 minutes. 

This Year's Confrimed TASH Talks are (in no particular order):






  • Let Them See Clearly LTSC- Catherine Carter 



  •  Happiness:  Fulfilling Life's Destiny Through Gainful Employment and Real Community Integration - Karen Copeland  



  • Diagnosis Disruption: Debunking the myths of non-verbal autism-Matthew Lager



  • Strategies for Teaching Job Interviewing Skills to Adults with Autism Spectrum- Disorder Adela Maurer 



  • Always There, Always Ready: A Talk on Parents and Policy-LaQuinta Montgomery



  • Resolution Opposing the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide-Shamby Polychronis 



  • Call to Action: Communication for All -Deborah Taub 



  • Compliance and Resistance: A Professional Learns to Navigate a Nursing Home -Maria Timberlake 



  • Darkness to Light: Presuming Competence -Nathan Trainor



  • Shifting Paradigms: Nonspeaking Does Not Equal Nonthinking-Elizabeth Voseller



  • Silencing the Silent-   Huan Voung 







Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:29pm - 5:20pm
Regency A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Always There, Always Ready: A Talk on Parents and Policy
Limited Capacity seats available

It is imperative that we continue the discussion of how current policies and practices can inhibit full inclusion of marginalized groups in schools, communities and workplaces. Though the viewpoint of parents is often devalued and dismissed, they remain staunch supporters of equality. Parents have always been at the forefront of efforts to ensure equitable access to resources and supports that are available to the public. When equipped with knowledge of research-based best practices, parents can become powerful advocates, partners in policy-making and fully-informed, engaged citizens adept at holding government officials and community leaders accountable.

Speakers
LM

LaQuita Montgomery

doctoral candidate, University of California Santa Barbara
I am a doctoral candidate and Board Certified Behavior Analyst from the University of California, Santa Barbara in the field of Special Education, Disabilities and Risk Studies. My work focuses on social and behavioral supports for caregivers and people with disabilities.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Regency A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Call to Action: Communication Access
Limited Capacity seats available

Communication is a basic human right and is the means by which all other rights are realized. All people communicate and are presumed to have an active interest in communicating decisions & choices. Research indicates that when provided with systematic instruction and support 98% of people make progress in learning a more traditional communication system. Yet, data suggests that there remain individuals who do not yet have augmentative communication systems in place in 3rd grade and students who leave high school without communication systems. Join TASH in a National Call to action to change this reality. 

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director of Research and Programs, Keystone Assessment


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Compliance and Resistance: A Professional Learns to Navigate a Nursing Home
Limited Capacity seats available

This personal narrative is from a long-time inclusive educator and TASH member who suddenly entered a new world after my mother was diagnosed with dementia. Despite my belief in competence, understanding of AAC and inclusive values, I found myself unable to enact meaningful action on behalf of my family member as well as naïve in the face of powerfully entrenched systems of care. I will share my insights about “presume competence”, “family involvement”, and other philosophical commitments to which I was deeply devoted and that I struggled to realize in this institutional environment. Despite numerous painful and frustrating interactions, I developed new insights on human dignity, competence, and autonomy that renewed– and also humbled my work on inclusive education and showed me the urgent need for cooperative advocacy across disciplines of education, community living and eldercare.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Timberlake

Maria Timberlake

Assistant Professor, SUNY Cortland


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Darkness to Light: Presuming Competence
Limited Capacity seats available

This is a reflection of my personal experiences with communication from start to finish. It provides insights, emotions, ideas and promoting advocacy for people with disabilities. It is in a slideshow format.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Diagnosis Disruption: Debunking the myths of non-verbal autism
Limited Capacity seats available

I have lived with social stigma my whole life. So often people make leaps that I am not smart when they see my unruly and crazy locomotive of a body. We get stigmatized because we don't have good reliable speech. People need to be more tolerant of something they really don't understand. Sometimes I worry I will never carry on a normal life as long as we are continually described this way. These descriptions of autistics need to change. The first thing, one should stop stereotyping us as emotionless robots with no common sense.” -- Matthew Lager, via letterboard/keyboard

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Finding Beauty in the Lou
Limited Capacity seats available

Katie Rodriguez Banister, a quadriplegic and paralyzed from the chest down, loves St. Louis and made a music video to prove it. Equity is essential. Katie's wheelchair has taught her that even with her disability, she is still a vital part of her community. Katies job is to educate and empower others through books, songs and poetry. Katie will share her music videos "Beauty in the Lou" and "Spring" about a float trip in a wheelchair. Finding the beauty in what some perceive as bad, Katie copes using her 4-point strategy that anyone can use.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Rodriguez Banister

Katie Rodriguez Banister

President, Access-4-All, llc
I am a speaker, author and disability educator. I have been a woman on wheels for twenty-six years and I share resources, books and my videos to inspire and empower. It took a wheelchair to find the man I love and married, so it's not all bad, right? I share my strategy for life that anyone can use.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Happiness: Fulfilling Life's Destiny Through Gainful Employment and Real Community Integration
Limited Capacity seats available

This TASH Talk is intended to provoke thought and discussion surrounding disability pay equality. Family members often do not understand the cultural barriers to employment that their children will face as they enter into adulthood. Teachers can initiate the conversation to prepare parents in becoming their own advocates as they witness how disabled individuals have limited dignified employment opportunities, regardless of living in a rural or urban setting. Inclusion begins in our schools, and we fight for it to continue through supporting for-profit businesses that can create jobs for individuals with disabilities and that truly offer real work for real pay.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Copeland

Karen Copeland

Managing Member, sammysoap
I am the parent of an adult son who happens to have intellectual disability as an attribute. Sam faced full-time adult day care after high school graduation. I believed his outcome was completely unacceptable, so I turned my outrage to business, then advocacy. Now, here I am, less than 3 years later, willing to explain why, what, and how we did what we did. We have a successful business named after my son ⎯ a store and factory called sammysoap... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Integration of iPads with students with low incidence disabilities in elementary schools
Limited Capacity seats available

The use of iPads in the classroom is a common scene in todayƒ??s schools. Technology use is thought to help provide students with another modality for learning the curriculum and provides a sense of equity between all students in the classroom. iPads, specifically, are leading the technology revolution in classroom environments. The benefits of iPads in instruction are that they assist all students, especially students with special needs. The focus of this research is to study the use of iPads in K-6 educational settings with students with low incidence disabilities.

Speakers
KH

Katie Heath

Professor of Childhood and Special Education, Roberts Wesleyan College
Katie Heath: is ABD in the School of Education at Syracuse University and has served as a TA for Teaching and Leadership Department undergraduate and graduate programs for the last four years. Katie's dissertation focus is on iPad usage with students with disabilities and how this plays out within a classroom environment. Katie works at Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester as a professor in childhood and special education.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Let Them See Clearly LTSC
Limited Capacity seats available

LET THEM SEE CLEARLY LTSC 1 IN 5 CHILD STRUGGLE WITH BINOCULAR VISION DISORDER My name is Catherine Carter and I am a mother of five, 4 of whom struggling with Binocular Vision Disorder BVD. BVD is a physiological condition where the brain and eyes fail to work in coordination to fuse and create a binocular image, resulting in neurological reactions such as: headaches/fatigue when reading, discomfort watching 3D movies, motion sickness, unable to read in a car, lazy/cross eyes, etc. (http://www.vlca.com/visionsymptoms.php). ATTICUS’ STRUGGLE WITH BVD My oldest son Atticus struggled from kindergarten to sixth grade: vomiting in school, reading dyslexia, writing dyslexia, concentration. Doctors diagnosed him as ADHD and prescribed medicine. However, Atticus symptoms got worse, and by fifth grade, he was begging for glasses (he has 20/20 vision), complaining of headaches, dizziness, vertigo, and had hours of blindness. All test came back negative. Finally I took him to a Costco optometrist to get glasses. After a long time, the optometrist came out and said my son was legally blind, glasses would not fix it, and he needs vision therapy. In shock I asked what was vision therapy. Testing by a behavioral optometrist showed Atticus suffered from a form of BVD, double vision. He immediately began vision therapy and began to see amazing results in his vision and behavior. The National Eye Institute NEI found office-based vision therapy to be 75% effective in curing BVD. I submitted his vision accommodations to the school, expecting them to have training and experience with this disorder, which they did not. They refused to recognize my son’s vision disability and provide any vision accommodations. He is in Home and Hospital Teaching Program because a year without accommodations strained his eye so much struggled to read past 15 minutes and PARCC testing triggered five days of dizziness and vertigo. FEDERAL LEGISLATION As a former teacher and parent I found it completely unacceptable the BVD and vision therapy is not recognized. 1 in 5 children struggle with BVD. I immediately contacted by state and federal representatives to share my son’s story and advocate for legislation to change this and help those struggling with BVD. They are currently working on legislation for BVD. In four weeks I have: -Filed a disability discrimination complaint with the Office of Civil Rights for the Department of Education -Have the support of Howard Board of Education, running, incumbents, and current members to look at BVD and how HCPSS can screen for and accommodate the 1/5 students who struggle with this. -Met with MD Senator Gail Bates who said in our meeting that she would work on state legislation and wanted to have Atticus testify in front the Education committee. -My son is in Home and Hospital Teaching Program since 2 days of PARCC testing triggered 5 days of dizziness and 6 hours of vertigo. Just Sunday I received a call from HCPSS to schedule an in home make up for Atticus to finish the PARCC. I refused, saying due to his vision disability he is unable to take it. I gave them a letter from my pediatrician to indicate the week before. -US Representative Elijah Cummings has sent a letter to Dr. Foose for HCPSS. He sent me a letter saying he was looking into the matter and will let me know when he receives a reply. -US Senator Cardin office contacted me. Their health and education offices legislation offices are currently working on BVD legislation. -Spoke to the National PTA federal advocacy legislation who requested updates and will offer their support once the bill is written and being up for a vote in D.C. (who adopted a resolution about vision developmental screening in July 1999 that school did not adopt) -Friday I also spoke to Howard County Executive Kittleman office about this issue, who is planning on discussing it with MD Senator Gail Bates this week. -I received correspondence from the White House that my letter from last week and contact information was forwarded to the appropriate agency. -The Office of Civil Rights for the Department of Education is investigating my disability discrimination complaint.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Carter

Catherine Carter

Let Them See Clearly LTSC
Working with my MD Senator and Delegate on advocating for The Atticus Act, comprehensive Maryland legislation to help those who struggle with binocular vision disorder (lazy/crossed eyes, convergence insufficiency, BVD). Helping the 38 million people (15 million of them children) struggling with ) in the US. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/lisbon-fulton/ph-ho-cf-atticus-carter-0929-20160925-story.html



Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Shifting Paradigms: Nonspeaking Does Not Equal Nonthinking
Limited Capacity seats available

25% of autistics have some level of difficulty communicating via speech. These individuals are erroneously identified by labels such as "low functioning" and "intellectually disabled". What is the difference between nonspeaking autistcs and their speaking counterparts? Apraxia, a neurological condition affecting the voluntary movement of the muscles used for speech and motor tasks. This TASH Talk will seek to dispel current misperceptions about the language skills and cognitive abilities of nonspeaking autistics and explain how purposeful motor skills can be taught to allow for successful communication via spelling.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Silencing the Silent
Limited Capacity seats available

I want to talk about silencing the already silent by denying their method of communication. This is the story about having a window open and a door slam. I was trapped in silence before I learned to use the letter board. Now that I have found a way to communicate, nobody in my school will let me use it. Advocacy for nonspeaking autistics must start with communication rights.

Speakers
avatar for Huan Voung

Huan Voung

Huan Vuong is 18 years old, a student at Wakefield High School in Arlington, VA. After years of silence, Huan now has found his true voice with Rapid Prompting Method (RPM). He is a leader in the Autism community and an advocate for those who still do not have a voice.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Stop Making Assumptions of Ignorance
Limited Capacity seats available

Tom Pruyn is an unreliably speaking autistic activist who was denied a meaningful education because his cognitive abilities were underestimated. I want to talk about how my mouth betrays me. You think that what I say is what I mean and often it is not. The letterboards allow me to slow down long enough to express my true thoughts. Th education system needs to know that words from my mouth are not the extent of my knowledge or desires.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Strategies for Teaching Job Interviewing Skills to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Limited Capacity seats available

Importance of Teaching Job Interviewing Skills Transition from high school to the community is a point at which individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unanticipated struggles (Osbourne & Reed, 2008). Shattuck and his colleagues (2012) surveyed 500 parents, guardians, and young adults with ASD. They found more than 50% of young adults, who had left high school in the past 2 years, had no participation in employment and also indicated that young adults with ASD had the lowest rates of participation in employment compared to young adults with other disabilities. One of the reasons why they are struggling with finding jobs is a lack of job interviewing skills. It is apparent that individuals with ASD have a hard time securing employment without the verbal and non-verbal communication skills required for job interviews (Higgins, et al, 2008). In this respect, it is important for special educators to teach these skills to this population. Strategies for Teaching Job Interviewing Skills Carter and his colleagues (2007) indicated that job interviewing skills could be best taught directly and systematically in a supportive and non-threatening class environment to learn and practice social and emotional development. Specifically, there have been a number of different strategies to teach students with ASD job interviewing skills, such as Peer Tutoring (PT; Bobroff & Sax, 2010; Kunsch, Jitendra, & Sood, 2007), Interview Skills Curriculum (ISC; Morgan, Leatzow, Clark, & Siller, 2014), and by using technology (Smith et al, 2014). Purpose of the TASH Talk This TASH Talk will discuss a literature on strategies for teaching job interviewing skills to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Several empirical studies on these strategies will be briefly presented, as well as implications and suggestions for future research.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

The Value of Communication: A Non-verbal Autistic's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Communication is not given the value it deserves - important ideas should be shared. Non-verbal autistics hear every conversation and have done a lot of thinking to come up with solutions to the world's problems. They would like to use RPM to participate and share their very important ideas.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 2:30pm - 5:20pm
Grand D 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:29pm

Poster Session
Limited Capacity seats available

Poster presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Presentations are displayed on 36"x48" boards on easels during a two-hour period. Poster presentations will take place on Wednesday, with Best Poster Award winners announced on Friday. See the full list of poster presentations HERE

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:29pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

A Couples Therapy Framework for Adult Couples with an Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Adult individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ID) are considered a hidden population. They are often stigmatized and ignored in many aspects of society and services. Currently, many families are taking a stand in advocating for their family member with a disability to experience as many aspects of adult life as they can. This has recently included experiencing adult long-term romantic relationships. As rates of couples within this population increase, couple and family therapists, social workers, and others who work with adults with ID are coming into contact with them more often. However, there is little understanding of the best way to conceptualize working with and understanding the dynamics of these couples. This poster will present a framework for understanding the important factors common across couples in which one or both has an ID. The theoretical framework provides an understanding of the particular dynamics and issues these couples face, and how these reciprocally influence one another. The framework is broken up by individual factors, family factors, factors within the couple dynamic, and culture/societal factors. Each factor of the framework and its intersection with the other factors will be described and discussed. A list of assessment questions to be used alongside the framework will also be presented. The direct usefulness and application of this framework as well as the assessment questions in daily practice and work with these couples will be discussed.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

A Young Adult's Journey to Community and Leisure Involvement
Limited Capacity seats available

A qualitative case study examining community and leisure participation of a young adult with a severe disability will be presented. Data were collected through observations in eight settings; document reviews of individual plans; and semi-structured interviews with family members, primary support personnel, and the individual with a disability. Implications for research and practice will be discussed.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Aided AAC Modeling to Promote Expressive Communication: Findings, Implications, and Future Directions
Limited Capacity seats available

All children need access to communication that empowers them to express their wants and needs, interact socially, participate fully in their environments, and share and receive information about the world. Although aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) offers a critical means to communicate for many children with complex communication needs, learning to use AAC involves more than being provided a deviceƒ??it requires children are supported and taught. This presentation shares the findings of a systematic review of 48 studies involving aided AAC modeling as a strategy to promote childrenƒ??s (i.e., birth to 21 years old) communication. In the review, intervention approaches were categorized according to three types of aided AAC modelingƒ??augmented input, models as prompts, and models within instructional demonstrations. Although the procedures and intervention components of these approaches varied, they were generally effective at improving diverse measures of childrenƒ??s expressive communication. This review offers key insight for researchers, educators, and family members by describing approaches to aided AAC modeling, evaluating their effectiveness, highlighting areas needing future research, and offering implications for practice.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Biggs

Elizabeth Biggs

Ph.D. Candidate, Vanderbilt University
2016 TASH Award Winner (Alice H. Hayden Emerging Leader Award) | | Elizabeth Biggs, M.A. is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special education teacher on the Navajo Nation in northwestern New Mexico. Her interests focus on identifying instructional and support strategies that promote the learning, full participation, and valued membership of children... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Assistive Technology for Students with Severe Disabilities: Current and Future Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

Local special education teachers and teacher candidates were surveyed and interviewed to determine the current use of assistive technology for students with severe disabilities. Professional attitudes and recommendations for future use were identified.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Miner

Craig Miner

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Autism and Robots: Empowerment using Alternative Employment Supports for a Nonverbal Adult
Limited Capacity seats available

This multidisciplinary project combines knowledge of Special Education and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) to (a) continue developing an economical, consumer-available robotic platform (Lego NXT), and (b) measure feasibility of use in supporting appropriate social behavior for employability of a nonverbal adult female with ASD. The symbolic Artificial Intelligence approach is used to control the robots, which are programmed with social scripts to help teach appropriate behavior. As a senior in high school, at age 21, the participant interacted with socially assistive robotics (SAR) only three times for a total of approximately 5 minutes during preliminary trials of this project. Six years later, baseline data shows 100% memory recall of the three interactions and her continued motivation and interest of the SAR. This project addresses the need to find innovative, economical, and unique resources that (a) support successful transition, employability, and equitable, meaningful inclusion among individuals with ASD where human interaction during the teaching phase may contribute to increased atypical social behavior and poorer quality of life, and (b) broaden possible alternative treatments that support successful inclusion among adults with ASD post-graduation from K-12.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Behavior Interventions and Attitudes in Inclusive Setting: Special Education Teachers in Thailand
Limited Capacity seats available

Ÿ??Behavior Interventions and Attitudes in Inclusive Setting: Special Education Teachers in ThailandŸ? The purpose of the research is to investigate the current behavior intervention practices and attitudes of Thai special education teachers supporting students with disabilities who have challenging behaviors. The results of the research are used to identify (a) the opportunity of students with disabilities who have challenging behaviors receiving quality interventions and supporting from the special education services in an inclusive classroom, and (b) the needs relating knowledge and skills of Thai special education teachers to support students with disabilities who have challenging behavior. The impact of this presentation will support all special educators to recognize the strengths and needs of special education services in Thailand relate to challenging behaviors. With high quality interventions and positive attitudes of special education teachers are the major keys to increase the opportunity of students with disabilities to be fully included in a regular classroom. Also, the effective interventions and positives attitudes are the vital elements for indicating that students with disabilities receiving the high quality education in schools to access the same education as other same-age students.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Beliefs about teaching for social justice and attitudes toward disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

A central mission of our teacher preparation program (TEP) is to prepare candidates to be social justice advocates. We intend as well to prepare candidates who view themselves as teachers of ALL students, not some students -- that they will enter the profession knowing to notice and challenge school practices that may marginalize children on the basis of disability as well as race, gender, class, and language. While the TEP used several key assessments to capture summative data about meeting the College unit standards, there were no pre/mid/post-program indicators of change with respect to social justice beliefs or attitudes toward people with disabilities. We identified three existing scales that reported strong validity and reliability and determined to administer these scales when students entered the program, at the mid-point, at the end of student teaching, and following their first year of teaching. The scales included: the (Boston College) Learning to Teach for Social Justice Beliefs Scale (Enterline, Cochran-Smith, Ludlow, et al, 2008; Ludlow, Enterline, & Cochran-Smith, 2008); the Attitudes Toward Disabled People Scale (Yuker, Block & Young, 1970; Alghzo, Dodeen, & Algaryouti, 2003), and The Multidimensional Attitudes Toward Inclusive Education Scale (Mahat, 2008). We hoped that information from these self-report Likert-types rating tools would provide a measure of preservice teachersƒ?? beliefs about social justice teaching, attitudes about people with disabilities, and readiness to teach others about disability in meaningful ways. Further, we hoped the findings would be used by program faculty to (a) further refine and enhance the existing course of study that addressed social justice (including ableism) as well as (b) identify dependent variables and intervention ideas for future studies intended to cultivate least restrictive attitudes toward preK-12 students with disabilities and others often marginalized in schools. Revising coursework relative to these findings will be a gateway to equity by preparing teachers to hold equitable attitudes and how to engage in practices that promote equity for all. Surveys were administered to sixty-five initial certification teacher candidates at two junctures (to date), pre and mid-program: 14 graduate-level special education majors; 8 undergraduate special education majors; and, 43 undergraduate general/special education combined majors. The participants identified as 12% male and 88% female; 12% fluent in more than one language; and 30% first generation college students. Sixty percent at pre-assessment reported their level of contact with someone who had a disability as ƒ??at least once per monthƒ? or more. Preliminary results indicated that participants (irrespective of group) reported positive beliefs about teaching for social justice and attitudes toward people with disabilities at the pre-assessment. The pre/mid-program change while not statistically significant indicated movement from ratings that reflected agreement to strong agreement for the LTSJ-B and the MATIES and, in the case of the ADTP, from agree pretty much to agree very much. Based on our preliminary analyses, findings suggested that teacher candidate experiences over the course of two semesters solidified an already positive stance toward social justice teaching and people with disabilities. We will share detailed item analyses within and across groups for our candidates and discuss our findings relative to previous reports in the literature for each scale and implications for our own TEP as well as others.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Building Comprehension of Employee Handbooks Using a Universal Design Approach
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation discusses the results of a pilot study using principles of Universal Design to adapt an employee handbook. The handbook, which was presented on an iBook, was adapted to participantsƒ?? reading level, included pictures, and the text was read aloud to the participants. The dependent variable for this study was the number of unprompted correct responses to comprehension questions presented after each page of text. This single case research design included three participants with developmental disabilities who were participating in a postsecondary university program. The handbook used for the study was from the university preschool, where two of the three participants were or would be working. This study helped build participantsƒ?? understanding of the expectations of the workplace.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Building State Capacity for Communication: A Case Study
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director of Research and Programs, Keystone Assessment


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Changing Perceptions: Disability Studies and Teacher Preparation
Limited Capacity seats available

Special education has historically been understood as a service provided to students with disabilities who are perceived to be too impaired to successfully progress in the general education curriculum and classroom. This perception has been reinforced through teacher preparation programs that rely heavily on the medical model of disability to prepare both special and general education teachers. While there is an increased push both legislatively and socially for more inclusive practices in education, this over-reliance on the medical model does little to nurture inclusive attitudes and worse, perpetuates deficit assumptions of disability. This presentation examines how one teacher preparation course infused Disability Studies into the curriculum and how it appeared to foster more inclusive attitudes.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Critical thinking for the pre-service inclusion teacher: Gateway to equity
Limited Capacity seats available

This session provides critical thinking tools and strategies that parents and teachers can use at home and in the inclusive classroom that promotes student growth, respect, and recognition. This yearŸ??s conference theme, Ÿ??Gateway to Equity,Ÿ? explores inclusive communities, thus the results from the study specifically describe how teacher candidates use critical thinking and universal intellectual standards to improve studentsŸ?? learning in the inclusive classroom.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Effective Mathematic Strategies for Students with Autism in Elementary School
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study is to present effective mathematics strategies for students with Autism in Elementary schools. Our daily life involves mathematics in many ways, therefore, acquiring basic mathematical skills is necessary for students with Autism for equal opportunities to have access to education, employment, leisure/recreation, and independent living. For the purpose of this presentation, effective mathematics strategies for students with Autism will be introduced and how educators can strengthen students to prepare for STEM education.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Engaging Families in New Conversations Using Evidenced Based Practices, Wraparound and RENEW
Limited Capacity seats available

Wraparound and RENEW are strengths-based, unconditional and collaborative processes grounded in family/youth voice and choice, among other principles. With the family driving the process, the identified team will leverage the family/youths strengths and needs to create one outcome-based plan. Participants will learn the principles and critical features of each process.  Participants will also hear from several families and learn how participating in the process of wraparound and/or RENEW supported their child in the school and community.   


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Functional Communication Training and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Meta-Analysis
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this meta-analysis was to summarize single-case intervention research in which individuals utilizing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) received functional communication training (FCT) in school settings to address challenging behavior. We will present (a) a descriptive summary of the research included in the review, (b) overall effect of intervention, (c) study characteristics that moderated intervention effect, and (d) implications for practice and research.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Joannou Lyon

Kristin Joannou Lyon

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Gateway to equity: DIfferentiated instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

This year's conference theme, "Gateway to Equity," emphasizes inclusive communities. Therefore, this study explores general and special education teachers' understanding of differentiated instruction and how effective differentiated instruction can be utilized to create equity in the inclusive classroom, one that is supportive of all students.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Improvment of Reading Fluency and Comprehension through Use of Colored Overlays
Limited Capacity seats available

Improvement of reading fluency and comprehension through the use of colored overlays with third grade students in a suburban school. The study was conducted through a multiple baseline study with four participants who were on the severe range from reading difficulty and reading discomfort. Percentage of non-overlapping data points and percent exceeding the median were the analysis completed. Colored overlay intervention showed an increase improvement in reading fluency from moderately effective to highly effective and on percentage of exceeding median was ineffective to highly effective when analysed with percent of non-overlapping points. Colored overlay intervention did show and increase in reading comprehension from ineffective to questionably effective based on points exceeding median and ineffective based on points exceeding non-overlapping points.

Speakers
avatar for Jillian Wilkison

Jillian Wilkison

Educational Diagnostician, Princeton Independent School District / Texas A&M University - Commerce
I enjoy working with individuals with special needs in the educational setting and the equestrian setting. I'm fairly new to transition from school to community and the resources that are available . I enjoy watching my students transform their horsemanship skills to the arena and their abilities to compete with individuals without special needs and be successful. I have one certified therapy dog and another in training. I have been an Irlen... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Living with a (Dis)Abilities in Postsocialist Ukraine: a fight for equity.
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation summarizes the current state of social inclusion and education for people with disabilities in Ukraine. Through recent interviews with local advocates for social inclusion and education a researcher from Ukraine analyses the current barriers to social integration for people with disabilities in Ukraine. Transcribed video interviews with youth with disabilities, their parents, government officials, school directors, teachers, and NGO leaders will be presented to give first hand insight in to the issues by those affecting, and those affected by, the current state of social inclusion and education in Ukraine. Events throughout Ukrainian history have shaped its culture to value uniformity which led to social exclusion for Ukrainians with disabilities. The historical lack of experience with diverse populations makes it a struggle for Ukrainians to accept and understand differences. A long Soviet history of people with disabilities being labeled, by definition, different, just compounds the issue. While there has been forward movement, discrimination is still pervasive and not all Ukrainians have a positive view of diversity. Nowadays, Ukraine is increasingly looking for opportunities to integrate people with special needs, but there are a myriad of barriers along the road to an inclusive society. In recent months, Ukraine has fought to get on the course to democracy, freedom and human rights, but people with disabilities are often still invisible and feel unwelcome in their own country. There are gaps in legislative laws, and tremendous architectural and social barriers for people who look or behave differently. Since Ukraine’s independence, churches, NGO’s and private schools have been the pallbearers for change, but there are still many areas in need of reform and the only way to become a truly inclusive country is to change the Ukrainian mentality towards these discriminated groups. The presenter hopes that the presentation, with first hand insight from people working in the field will help educators, students, parents, caregivers and others who support the growth and learning of children become familiar with the current state of social inclusion and education in Ukraine.

Speakers
avatar for Inna Stepaniuk

Inna Stepaniuk

PhD student, University of Kansas


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Making Reverse Inclusion Work to Benefit All
Limited Capacity seats available

The journey of one high school special education teacher making reverse inclusion work in her classroom benefit all. The result is an overwhelming power of social inclusion radiating the school community.

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Opening Doors to Inclusion for Nonspeaking Autistic Students through Creative Collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

Our panel of professionals, will present their collaborative efforts to support nonspeaking students who spell to communicate in their efforts to access meaningful education. Educator, Kelsey Aughey, educates students at grade level by supporting their methods of alternative communication.  Shelley Carnes, Administrator for the Hirsch Academy has established a network of school administrators across the country who embrace alternative communication for their learners. Hirsch serves as a model for other schools, public and private who seek ways to embrace nonspeaking students. SLP, Elizabeth Vosseller, teaches students the requisite motor skills to spell or type to communicate. Once fluent, students are able to participate in education, community and self-advocacy. Samantha Crane, attorney for ASAN is actively supporting the communicative rights of nonspeaking autistics who are being denied access to their communication method, and therefore to inclusion, in their public schools in a Title II complaint with the US Department of Justice. The panel will speak to their successes, challenges and ongoing efforts as well as suggestions for inclusion of nonspeaking autistics.   



Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

People who use AAC, Relationships, and Sexuality
Limited Capacity seats available

Sexuality plays an important role in what it means to be human, and has an intricate connection within and throughout our lives. (Pownall, Jahoda, & Hastings, 2012; Bernert & Ogletree, 2013). The World Health Organization defines sexual health as ƒ??a state of physical, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality. It requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violenceƒ? (WHO, 2015). Research literature documents many aspects of disability and sexuality however very limited research investigates how the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) impacts the development and maintenance of intimate relationships. Communication is imperative for developing sexuality. In a study completed by Friedman, Arnold, Owen, and Sandman, self-advocates with intellectual and developmental disabilities identified communication as a crucial aspect of practicing sexual self-advocacy especially in the terms of speaking up, accessing information, and building healthy and positive relationships (2014). For people with complex communication needs, who primarily use AAC for communication, this presents an added layer of complexity. Communication is, undoubtedly, an important aspect of sexuality. However, for individuals with complex communication needs, communication is much more complex. AAC allows for individuals who have complex communication needs to communicate with those around them and may consist of high tech, no tech, or low tech devices that allow individuals to communicate with the people around them. This form of communication, while incredibly helpful for individuals with CCN, is still faced with stigma and negative connotations from the eyes of a nondisabled world. Even within an AAC device individuals may not have access to the vocabulary required to communicate about sexuality. Because of the importance of communication in developing and maintaining sexuality, this study will seek to understand the experiences and perspectives of individuals who primarily use AAC to communicate. What limited research is currently available on the topic of AAC use and sexuality mainly describes ways in which sexual abuse can be prevented for individuals who use AAC. While this is, indeed, a crucial topic, it limits the research to negative aspects of sexuality alone. This research study seeks to help professionals in the fields of communication sciences and disorders and AAC development to understand the experiences of individuals who use AAC. It also seeks to provide individuals who use AAC with information about the experiences of sexuality and relationships that other individuals who use AAC have shared.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Practitioner-Implemented Communication Interventions for Students With Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The goal of this literature review on practitioner-implemented communication supports was to describe the literature and answer five questions. First, where and with what type of practitioner and student are communication supports being used? Second, what types of communication interventions are being used? Third, what is the relative effectiveness of these interventions? Does student outcome data support practitioner effectiveness data? Fourth, are maintenance and generalization measures being taken to ensure individuals with disabilities are benefitting from this type of training after the researchers discontinue treatment? Fifth, What limitations currently exist in the research? We coded 37 studies including 165 practitioners providing communication supports to 170 students with disabilities. Success estimates for practitioners and students were calculated. Various training strategies were used and over half of studies measured maintenance of the practitioner effects over time. A little less than half of studies generalized the practitioner training to other students, skills, and/or settings.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Professional Development Program: Implementation of Universal Instruction Design to Promote Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Provide Universal Instructional Design to ensure inclusive classrooms for all students by using multi-model teaching techniques to promote academic performance.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Promoting Use of Social Media as a Strategy to Enhance Social Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will suggest strategies for individuals and their allies to increase the use of various social media platforms by all people, regardless of their support needs. This overview will include descriptions of various social media applications and will recommend specific actions that will enhance an individualƒ??s ability to connect to friends, family members and other natural supports within these environments. This presentation will also include suggestions on how to ensure personal safety of users who may be vulnerable to exploitation.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

So You Want to Be a School Leader? How Making Connections Through Leadership Positions Impacts Special Education TeachersŸ?? Job Satisfaction and Job Self-efficacy
Limited Capacity seats available

Previous research has indicated that individual social ties impact access to resources with organizational structures. Recently, education researchers have examined school and district organization structures and the relationship between teacher and leader social ties in these systems. Some research suggests that having strong social ties improves teacher retention, job satisfaction, and job self-efficacy. However, little research has examined the social ties of special education teachers, particularly special education teachers who teach students with moderate to severe disabilities. In addition, little is known about the relationship between individual factors and social ties with job satisfaction and job self-efficacy of teachers of students with moderate to severe disabilities. Utilizing social capital theory and our understanding of information advice networks, we studied the relationship between special education teacherŸ??s use of social tie opportunities (e.g., coaching a sport, sponsoring a club, school/district task force member) and their job self-efficacy and job satisfaction. We also identify how these opportunities differ between general education and special education teachers and within group differences amongst special education teachers in inclusive, resource, or self-contained classrooms. To do this, we utilize teacher data in the School and Staffing Study of 2011 (SASS), a nationally representative study of teachers and schools. We use confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and propensity score matching (PSM) to first identify social ties (CFA) and then understand how the treatment of social ties impacts teacher job self-efficacy and job satisfaction, by classroom context. We report our findings within a nested framework recognizing that teacher and school characteristics likely impact opportunity for teacher social ties (e.g., school locale, school size). Implications for research, policy, and practice include structuring schools so that special education teachers can access opportunities to build social ties and leadership positions within the schools. We also share resources for identifying indicators to answer other research questions related to special education teachers using the SASS data.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Social Acceptance of Elementary School Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Fostering social connectedness and meaningful participation is essential to the success of inclusive educational programming. Such belonging is also partially dependent on the treatment of students with severe disabilities by general education peers who are selective in determining classmates with whom to interact or form relationships. The current study quantitatively evaluates the relationship between paraprofessional support and the social acceptance of students with severe disabilities by their peers at the elementary level. The presentation is well aligned with the 2016 TASH theme Ÿ??Gateway to Equity.Ÿ? The focus of the presentation is to evaluate the quality of social inclusion of elementary school students with severe disabilities to help the field realize progress made and areas of need in establishing full inclusion of elementary school students with severe disabilities. The data focuses on the real life environments and experiences of elementary school students with severe disabilities. We believe the improvement of participation and learning through the development of peer relationships is meaningful and addresses an important social injustice many students with severe disabilities experience in school settings. TASH envisions, that Ÿ??all individuals with disabilities enjoy individualized supports and a quality of life similar to that available to all peopleŸ? and we feel that the study we are presenting is a building block toward achieving this vision.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Students with Learning Disabilities: The Importance of Professional Development Opportunities in Postsecondary Education
Limited Capacity seats available

The reason why I have chosen this topic is because I work as an Instructional Associate for Disability Students Program and Services program Orange Coast College, California. I work closely with students who have learning disabilities and am very passionate about their overall educational success. This presentation will focus on students with learning disabilities and most prominent educational barriers that they come across in post-secondary education. Some of the most dominant ones pertain to: inadequate accommodations provided to students with learning disabilities, stigma, and faculty's responsiveness to accommodation process. The information presented on this poster will be based on the research and personal stories.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Supports in the general education setting: Educator's perceptions
Limited Capacity seats available

Application of a social-ecological model to students with disabilities in schools calls for supports to be provided that increase access to inclusive settings; requiring educators to identify, arrange, and implement supports. Yet, little is known about educator perceptions of importance of different types of supports. This presentation will summarize findings from an investigation on priorities ascibed to different types of supports in inclusive setting.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

The effects of embedding distributed trials in a shared story on the acquisition and behaviors of students with Autism and Intellectual Disabilties
Limited Capacity seats available

3. This study used a single subject alternating treatment design to compare the effects of embedding distributed trials in a shared story and traditional Discrete Trial Training (Mass Trials) on functional skills acquisition for students with Intellectual Disabilities. The Mass Trial (MT) intervention taught the functional skills in its traditional format (Lovaas, 1987) across 10 trials, in a segregated setting. The distributed trial (DT) intervention differed by embedding the functional skills in a shared story. During the distributed trials intervention each skill was embedded for a total of 10 trials. All intervention sessions were randomized across students and outcomes were compared.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

The Importance of Housing Opportunity
Limited Capacity seats available

Where a person lives affects every aspect of their life. Fair housing laws and policies are in place to ensure equal opportunity in housing. This session will highlight, through discussion, the importance of housing choice and tips for advocating for inclusiveness in your communities.

Speakers
avatar for Vard McGuire

Vard McGuire

Fair Housing Coordinator, Disability Law Center


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Therapeutic Horseback Riding Incorporating Pivotal Response Treatment to Enhance Social Communication and Sensory Processing of Children with Autism
Several research studies have proposed that autism is primarily a social disorder that is evident very early, often in infancy (for example, social interaction with family members and play with others), and becomes more pronounced through the early years. Social communication deficit can cause secondary delay in communication abilities and lead to behavior problems that are closely related to these delays in communication abilities (Koegel & Koegel,2006). When children cannot communicate, they may become frustrated, and maladaptive behaviors tend to appear and intensify. It is important to understand that inappropriate behaviors are maladaptive behaviors that are attempts to communicate when functional communication has failed to develop. Therefore, enhancing functional social communication skills can reduce the need of the children to rely on maladaptive behaviors and also foster their learning and engagement in school and community settings (Eikeseth, Smith, Jahr, & Eldevik, 2002). In addition to social communication deficit, many children with autism experience sensory processing difficulties that has been recently highlighted in the autism diagnosis criteria(DSM-5, 2013), under the 'restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviours' descriptors. These children might exhibit hypo or hyper sensitivity in many areas such as tactile, visual, auditory, taste, smell, body movements and positions, that can be manifested by seeking or avoiding sensory stimulation in the environment(Ashburner, Ziviani, & Rodger, 2008). Since social communication and sensory processing occur in a natural social context. It is crucial to apply intervention strategies that enhance these skills in a natural environment. Natural environment context allows children with autism to be exposed to different type of stimuli and learn how to adapt with them, which can enrich their learning and social communication in various educational and community settings. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1. Develop children's social communication skills and their engagement in school and community settings. 2. Implement Pivotal Response Treatment with children with autism in natural environment settings. 3. Identify different strategies underlying Pivotal Response Treatment 4. Incorporate Therapeutic Horseback Riding with Pivotal Response Treatment in order to enhance social communication and sensory integration of children with autism in natural inclusive setting.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Transition Trends for Students with Developmental Disabilities, Intellectual Disabilities, Autism, and Multiple Disabilities Since IDEA 1990: A Literature Review on the Methods, Topics, and Interventions
Limited Capacity seats available

Found in 22 top special education journals from 1990 to 2015. Findings will describe longitudinal trends associated with transition age students with significant disabilities, transition-related topics addressed, and the type of methodology and interventions used. Specifically, results will portray (a) which special education journals included transition articles about students with severe disabilities, (b) participant demographics, (c) article type, (d) methodology and intervention (e) topics, (f) setting, and (g) location. The poster will conclude by describing implications for future research.

Speakers
SW

Samantha Walte

University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Using Peer Supports in Work Based Settings for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This study examined the effects of peer support interventions in work-based high school settings on the work and social skills of students with significant disabilities. Research has documented peer support interventions have improved academic and social skills for students with and without significant disabilities in general education settings (Carter, Sisco, Melekoglu, & Kurkowski, 2007). This study used peer supports as a natural support option in an inclusive high school work setting to improve independent work and social skills for students with significant disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

Lindsay Athamanah

Doctoral Student, University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Using Student Input for Research about Transition-Aged Students with Significant Disabilities Since IDEA 1990
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster will present results from a systematic review of 661 transition-focused articles found in 22 top special education journals (1990 to 2015). We will focus this presentation on articles that include input from transition-age youth with ID, DD, MD, and ASD to identify primary topics, methods, and results. Specifically, results will describe (a) which special education journals included transition articles with input from students with severe disabilities, (b) participant demographics, (c) article type, (d) methodology and intervention (e) topics, (f) setting, and (g) location. The poster will conclude by describing implications for future research.

Speakers
SW

Samantha Walte

University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Using Writing to Create Equity and Encourage Creativity in the Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Creative writing allows expression that is too often forgotten about in classrooms where expectations are set by rigorous standards. Writing lessons can be a way that you create an environment where students are actively engaged and excited about the work they produce while still meeting the Common Core Standards. When it comes to instructing writing in an inclusive classroom it is important that students are able to have an outlet where they can be imaginative and create pieces that allow an opportunity for expression. This presentation will allow participants a chance to hear from two former teachers who implemented inclusive literacy practices into their own classrooms. Participants will be able to walk away with resources and strategies that will allow them to individualize creative writing lessons to fit the strengths and needs of all learners. Additionally, participants will be able to discuss the ideas of differentiation in creative writing lessons and how that can lead to instructional practices that foster equity in the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

Special Education Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Video Hero Modeling" (VHM), on improving self-care skills of elementary-aged students with developmental disabilities
In this poster presentation  I will present six case studies investigating the effects of a video-based intervention, called "Video Hero Modeling" (VHM), on improving self-care skills of elementary-aged students with developmental disabilities. They were enrolled in a special school for students with intellectual disabilities. Five were low functioning students with autism spectrum disorders and the remaining one was a student with an intellectual disability.        
In VHM, each of the students watched a video in which a hero, with which the student was preoccupied, engages in the student's target behavior immediately before the student had to exhibit the behavior. When the hero was readily available as realistic-looking figures, the main process of developing the VHM was as follows:  
1. Wear single colored gloves and sleeves and manipulate the hero figure engaging in the target behavior in front of the same colored wall.
2. Film the hero engaging in the target behavior in #1.
3. Use the keying function of a video-editing software to make the color transparent and overlap it with a scene of the natural setting where the student is required to exhibit the target behavior.
4. Insert voice message.      

When the hero was an actor or cartoon character from a TV program which no realistic-looking representation was commercially available, the main process of developing the VHM was as follows:
1. Film an adult modeling the target behavior in a natural setting where the student is required to exhibit the target behavior.
2. Edit the video in a way that includes only the part of the adult (e.g., below the neck or nose).
3. Film the hero on a TV program.
4. Use the rod brush function of a video-editing software to cut off the animated face of the hero.
5. Use the keying function of a video-editing software to make the color transparent and overlap it with the scene edited in #2.  
6. Insert voice message.      

Results indicated that five out of six students dramatically improved their performance of the self-care skills. Two of the five students talked about the videos while engaging in the corresponding task. Furthermore, one student said, "I am (hero's name)," while engaging in the target behavior. Although the five students, who benefited from VHM, pretended he or she is the hero during free time, the remaining one student did not. All students smiled while watching the VHM, however.        

In conclusion, VHM could be used to help elementary-aged students with developmental disabilities improve their self-care skills if pretending they are the hero is observed during free time.        

Engaging in some self-care skills may be aversive to some students. In addition, adults who teach the aversive skills may be aversive to the students. VHM has the potential to make engaging in self-care skills enjoyable and valuable to the students because engaging in the skills results in being like the hero. In other words, VHM has the potential to transform what teachers want to teach into what students want to learn. This transformation promotes students' self-determination and improves their quality of life. In this sense, VHM is a gateway to equity.  

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

What have I learned from my practicum? Changes in views of teacher efficacy and concerns about inclusive education
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate how practicum experience changes the confidence levels and/or concerns that preservice general education teachers have regarding teaching students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms. A total of 102 preservice teachers participated in pre-experience and post-experience surveys. Results of the study indicate that preservice teachersƒ?? confidence levels in their ability to teach diverse types of disabilities decreased, and that they preferred to teach students with mild disabilities over students with severe disabilities. Preservice teachers show more positive attitudes about inclusive education when they had experience teaching students with disabilities in inclusive settings. In addition, various concerns such as resources and acceptance were mitigated after practicum experience with students with disabilities. The implications of the results for teacher education programs are discussed. Issues related to the results are also discussed.

Speakers

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Grand F 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Exhibit Hall Opens!
Join us as we kick off another TASH Conference with long-time TASH attendees and first-timers alike! The Conference Exhibit Hall will be open so you can check out organizations and businesses that support inclusive practices across the country. This reception includes a cash bar and hors d’oeuvres. We will also conduct the TASH Awards as part of the Opening Reception.

List of Exhibitors coming soon!

 

Wednesday November 30, 2016 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Exhibit Hall 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

5:30pm

TASH Awards and Opening Reception
Limited Capacity seats available

The TASH Awards and Opening Reception will feature the 2016 TASH Award winners as well as conference exhibitors. Attendees will have the chance to network and visit exhibit booths. Food and beverages will be shared with attendees and music will be performed by United by Music North America.

2016 TASH Award Winners 
  1. Paula Lane,
  2. Andres Paniagua,
  3. Elizabeth Harrah,
  4. Angela Kehler,
  5. Gretchen Cason,
  6. Lori Robertson
  7. Sparkle Green, and
  8. Zavier Kinville

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


Wednesday November 30, 2016 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Exhibit Hall 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103
 
Thursday, December 1
 

7:30am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH Conference attendees. The room is located near the atrium (glass floor) area of the hotel.

Thursday December 1, 2016 7:30am - 6:00pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Conference Exhibit Hall will be open so you can check out organizations and businesses that support inclusive practices across the country. 

List of Exhibitors coming soon!

Thursday December 1, 2016 8:00am - 7:00pm
Exhibit Hall 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Caregiver Manual: Improving the lives of children in a Chinese orphanage
Limited Capacity seats available

Children with disabilities who reside in orphanages in China are often cared for by women who lack basic education and knowledge of typical child development let alone complex support needs. Most have never known a person with a disability before beginning work at an orphanage. Lack of knowledge and sense of worth for children with disabilities is compounded by frequent turnover and limited training materials. The purpose of this project was to develop a simple but direct caregiver manual, which focused on basic principles of care while promoting the worth of children with disabilities in a sustained effort to increase their value and quality of life. After this session, participants will have an awareness of the current situation in state-run, Chinese orphanages and level of staff competence. After this session, participants will be aware of efforts to provide training to orphanage caregivers. Participants will learn about the construction, contents, and implementation of the caregiver manual. Participants will learn about the need to raise awareness of the plight of orphans in China and throughout the global community.

Speakers
CM

Christine Macfarlane

Professor, Pacific University


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Palette of Possibility: 1 play, 3 organizations, endless inclusive opportunities!
Limited Capacity seats available

Red painted play. Blue painted water. And yellow painted light. So begins the story of the play Palette of Possibility, a theatre based adventure that embraces best practices for creative engagement and imaginative exploration in inclusive settings for audiences aged four through adult. This conference session will: explore the unique contributions that mindfully devised theatre performance can provide inclusive communities and schools; showcase specific ways to support shared opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enter dramatic worlds and share those creative experiences and expressions with their non-disabled peers; demonstrate how mindful collaboration among three very different non-profit agencies can combine resources to expand and integrate services in order to generate sustainable and affordable arts experiences for audiences of multiple ages and abilities. This is NOT a story about a modified single performance Ÿ??for those kidsŸ? production. Rather, Palette of Possibility is a Ÿ??stand aloneŸ? piece, designed for all audience members but creatively developed to specifically address the low language, highly visual, physical, engaging, interactive and sensory exploration needs of audiences with autism and other developmental delays. In addition, Palette of Possibility is not only a unique play but is also a model for collaboration among three distinct organizations in order to create a shared arts experiences for the diverse populations they serve. By journeyŸ??s end, Palette will have combined the fiscal resources and creative efforts of a professional youth theatre, a community based arts organization and a state university. The project will perform in two states, in more than 13 venues, featuring 82 performances; and reaching over 3,765 audience members. After this session, participants will be able to: Identify best practices for creating theatre work that places the unique needs of disabled audience members at the center of the work Discuss ways in which multiple arts entities and agencies can collaborate and share resources in order to expand creative experiences for inclusive populations in schools, theatres, and community centers Create arts based programs founded on best practices for creative engagement, exploration and communication

Speakers
avatar for Gretta Berghammer

Gretta Berghammer

Professor, University of Northern Iowa
I do drama and theatre inclusion work, both in classrooms and in production.


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Place at the Table: Self-Advocates on Boards and Systems'Change Initiatives
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! leaders from DC's self-advocacy coalition serve on over 30 boards, committees, workgroups and systems change initiatives. Join this interactive session to hear about how Project ACTION! members identified places on which they wanted to be represented and gained their place at those tables. Presenters also will share strategies for getting support prior to and at meetings so that they can fully participate; advocacy for accommodations; different ways to get on a board (e.g., being elected, volunteering, being appointed by a Mayor or Governor, etc.); and the roles that advisors and allies can play in supporting membership and participation. Project ACTION! leaders also will engage the audience so that others can share their experiences in finding their own voices and representing the interests of others on community and disability-specific boards, committees and workgroups. Participants will: 1. Learn about the different types of boards, committees and workgroups on which people can serve. 2. Discuss ways to advocate for the accommodations and support you might need to feel prepared and fully participate. 3. Share their experiences on boards, committees, workgroups and systems change initiatives. 4. Identify strategies to find your voice and get a seat at the tables that are important to you, including the use of advisors and allies.


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Story About Finding Our Place
Limited Capacity seats available

Being young men autism enrolled in a transition program at a university has helped us in many ways. One of the ways that we find it most amazing is the different experiences we get to have with our peers in college. This will be the story of us trying to find our way in campus life at a university as transition students with intellectual disabilities. There are many obvious ways that being enrolled in a transition program has helped us, but there are also some things that are awesome that may not be so obvious. For example, we get to learn cool and innovative things while other university students are learning how to teach or work with students. Like when we go to the student recreation center and workout with a partner; they get to learn about creating individualized workout plans while we learn more about health and exercise. However, the most awesome experiences we have sometimes are the times when we just get to be part of a group, like when the fraternities on campus invite us over for Ÿ??guys dayŸ? or the other fraternity and sorority host a Spring Formal for us. These kinds of positive experiences are much different than the ones we experienced in high school when other kids would sometimes ignore us or ridicule us. When we are on campus, we are just another part of the student population and fit in just like everyone else. This is a very different story than we ever thought we would be able to tell. -Participants will hear our first hand accounts of the Ÿ??collegeŸ? experience from the perspective of persons with autism -Participants will learn specifically about our college transition experience at a large 4-year institution and the experiences we

Speakers
AW

Amy Williamson

CrossingPoints Coordinator, The University of Alabama


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Tale of Two Classrooms: Inclusive Elementary School Classroom Literacy Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

A Tale of Two Classrooms looks to explore how the use of Common Core State Standards, assessment, goal development, and differentiation can meet (and work!) within elementary inclusive literacy classrooms. Personal experience from two special and general education certified teachers about practices developed, tested, and proven to be effective will be shared. Both former teachers worked with students with and without disabilities in the inclusive environment, collaborating with many service providers and other teachers. Discussion about how to foster self-determination, goal development, and the use of assessment data will be discussed. Additionally, discussion of how to support all learners, including those with complex support needs, will be addressed in regards to both academic and social needs as well as self-determination. After this session, participants will be able to: - provide differentiated literacy activities in an elementary school classroom - provide options to encourage students to take ownership of their learning - support goal development and foster independence for all learners


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

A Team Approach to Real Community Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

This session provides strategies and approaches for building a quality community-based life for an adult with intellectual disabilities. The steps of the process include the development of a small team of family, friends and community members. The team then develops a comprehensive person-centered plan based on the person's (and the team's) hopes and dreams, abilities and needs, with a focus on true community inclusion. Structures for meeting content, planning and implementation will be addressed, as well as strategies for addressing the need for team member recruitment. Three types of teams are addressed in the presentation: Microboards, (teams developed to support one person with a disability as an incorporated provider), Cooperatives (teams working together to support multiple people with disabilities as an incorporated provider) and informal teams. The IAMC (Illinois Association of Microboards and Cooperatives) has been developing individual teams for the past 10 years, and will provide many examples of success for people with wide-ranging abilities. Participants will understand the components of team building. Participants will discuss and understand the components of person-centered planning. Participants will generate ideas for developing teams. Participants will understand the value of community inclusion and it's impact on the quality of life for individuals with disabilities

Speakers
avatar for Vicki Niswander

Vicki Niswander

Executive Director, Illinois Association of Microboards and Cooperativ
I have been an advocate for my 33-year-old daughter, Annie, and other for more than 30 years. I strongly believe that every person with a disability can live the life they choose with the supports they need to make it happen. Our organization, the IAMC, works to achieve that for people with IDD, one person at a time. | I also host a weekly radio program on disability issues. Disability Beat airs every Monday from 5:30-6pm on WEFT Community Radio... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

ABLE Accounts: How They Work And How They Compare
Limited Capacity seats available

Laws and regulations change and the confusion can make savings for disability-related expenses difficult. Families and individuals face the potential loss of federal benefits or the unintended consequence of not providing for future welfare. The ABLE Act is something new under the sun for the special needs community. This presentation will review the legal and regulatory updates of ABLE, how accounts are structured, the limitations, and the benefits. The presentation will also touch upon other exempt financial resources that families/providers can access and how they interact with ABLE. The amount of information available from Social Security, Medicaid, and other sources can be overwhelming. Many times families turn to providers for direction. This session will provide a concise reference for ABLE and other exempt savings options for providers and families. Top 3 Objectives: 1. Review and summarize the legal and regulatory updates of the ABLE ACT 2. Evaluate and compare options available to protect government benefits and assets 3. Explain how families and providers can incorporate ABLE for individuals in their care Description: Laws and regulations change and the confusion can make savings for disability-related expenses difficult. Families and individuals face the potential loss of federal benefits or the unintended consequence of not providing for future welfare. The ABLE Act is something new under the sun for the special needs community. This presentation will review the legal and regulatory updates of ABLE, how accounts are structured, the limitations, and the benefits. The presentation will also touch upon other exempt financial resources that families/providers can access and how they interact with ABLE. The amount of information available from Social Security, Medicaid, and other sources can be overwhelming. Many times families turn to providers for direction. This session will provide a concise reference for ABLE and other exempt savings options for providers and families. Thank you. I hope this will be a helpful addition to your agenda. Have a great weekend.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

8:20am

Access to Equity: Findings from a Survey of District Special Education Administrators
Limited Capacity seats available

Although extant research shows the positive impact that inclusive environments have on academic and postschool outcomes for students with intellectual disability, this population of students continues to experience wide variability in access to general education environments. In order to explore factors impacting this variability, the researchers conducted a survey of how district special education administrators in New York State interpret and implement federal and state education policies that govern the educational environments for students with intellectual disability. Survey results are presented around demographic and other characteristics and the scope of work of school district administrators, and their perspectives of the implementation of and barriers to inclusive practices for students with intellectual disability in districts in New York State. After this session, participants will be able to 1. Identify demographic and background characteristics of special education administrators in districts in New York State. 2. Understand the activities in which district special education administrators engage 3. Identify the perspectives of special education directors on the implementation of and barriers to inclusive practices and placement for students with intellectual disability in the districts in New York State.

Speakers
JM

Julia M. White

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

All about Us- A journey of friendship
Limited Capacity seats available

Sharing of 2 separate lives that joined together in friendship in 2012. Together they helped each other with decision making through the years. The friendship carries across all areas from Circle of Support, to conferences, and moving from employment as a Teaching Assistant to taking classes towards a non-credit certificate. Finding Life long Friendship College Social Experience Employment options in higher education Selection of courses and certificates Defining your journey.

Objectives: Finding Life long Friendship College Social Experience  Employment options in higher education Selection of courses and certificates Defining your journey  

Speakers
avatar for Bud Buckhout

Bud Buckhout

Director of InclusiveU, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Higher Education
Stanley or better known as “Bud” Buckhout has worked in education for over 20 years. He earned is Teaching Certificate, Masters in Special Education and A Certificate of Advanced Study from Le Moyne College. He has worked in exploring research and facilitation of groups to aid in the identification of student instructional needs at the collegiate, district and school level.  He has implemented trainings at many educational levels to develop... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Creating an Inclusive Cycling Community in Which we ALL Ride Together
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this presentation is to share how our Cycle St. Louis Initiative is developing a more inclusive community by uniting multiple St Louis organizations, both those that support people with disabilities and those that have mainly focused on the general public. We are working together to learn from one another and to create inclusive opportunities for cycling within our communities and transportation.

After this session, participants will be able to:


  • Incorporate inclusive cycling opportunities within the natural community calendar and transportation system.

  • Empower organizations, both that support people with disabilities and those that have previously focused on the general public, to unite and collaborate for current and future change within planning of community recreation and transportation.

  • Organize a calendar of events to provide participants with cycle assessments, cycle basics and safety training and inclusive community ride opportunities. 



This past June, TASH spoke with Susan Fleming about the new recreation and leisure track at this year's conference. To listen to the podcast episode, click the image below or here.



Speakers
avatar for Susan Fleming

Susan Fleming

Executive Director, Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis
Susan Fleming serves as the Executive Director of the Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis, a not-for-profit organization that works to promote and support recreation opportunities for individuals with disabilities who reside in the Greater St. Louis area. Susan has worked in this capacity for over twenty-five years. Her work allows her to help create a world that is more accepting of people of all abilities, allowing for more recreation... Read More →
avatar for Brandie Martine

Brandie Martine

Steering Committee Member, Cycle St. Louis
Cycle St. Louis is a partnership between St. Louis organizations to develop and promote more inclusive opportunities for cycling within our communities and transportation. | | Brandie Martine is an advocate for people.  Her family has inspired her to work with initiatives that promote all types of people enjoying time together in natural settings.  These "natural settings" can be found where we work, live and play.   | | As a... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Creative Inclusiveness
Limited Capacity seats available

The self directed supported employment model fosters a sense of self-worth, opens opportunities for personal growth and leads to greater independence for individuals with disabilities. Lessons learned and outcomes from Artist FirstŸ??s innovative supported employment program Lifeworks can be replicated beyond the art world, fostering full participation and inclusion. Lifeworks is a guided self-employment program. This program gives professionally minded artists with disabilities the chance to create art as a career. Artists First staff facilitates financial independence for the participants by vigorously seeking out opportunities locally, regionally, and nationally to display, market and sell Lifeworks participants' artwork. Lifeworks' staff collaboratively identifies employment goals and develops a realistic action plan with participants. Artists with disabilities are empowered in developing their own road map to meaningful employment opportunities through creative self-expression. Through career coaching, participants further employment skills such as communication and self-advocacy. . By the end of the session, participants will be able to compare and contrast different employment models for individuals with disabilities. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify and implement inclusive employment actions. By the end of the session participants will be able to understand the connection between creative self-expression and personal growth.


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Emerging Issues With Supported Decision Making
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported decision making has been given great prominence due to the UN Convention. However, at the level of practice it is quite challenging to apply. This session will identify and discuss various of the practice challenges that have arisen thus far with a view to gaining further clarity about what is involved in implementing supported decision making. To clarify what supported decision making may involve at the level of practice Clarify the challenges that have arisen to date Identify possible ways forward with supported decision making

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Costanzo

Cathy Costanzo

Executive Director, Center for Public Representation
Cathy Costanzo, is the executive director of the Center for Public Representation and was formerly its legal director. She has co‑authored two law review articles and co‑counsels several system reform injunctive cases involving the development of community service systems in Massachusetts, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington, D.C. She developed several legislative and media campaigns on abuse and neglect, and anti‑aversive legislation... Read More →
MK

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting Intl
I have been very involved in person centered approaches that result in enriched lives for the person who is the focus. This interest has led to many associated questions such as values based leadership, defining and achieving quality outcomes, embedding people in valued roles in community life, generating natural supports, meeting needs effectively, discerning people's passions and life interests,safeguarding personal vulnerabilities, growth... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Inclusion in Postsecondary Education through Supports Available to All
Limited Capacity seats available

The dynamic growth of inclusive higher education for students with intellectual disabilities, in more than 20 Florida Universities, State Colleges, and Career/Vocational Technical Colleges & Centers will be discussed. A partnership between four institutions of higher education, the Florida Consortium on Inclusive Higher Education (FCIHE), includes the University of Central Florida, Florida International University, the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, and Florida State College Jacksonville. The Consortium, as a funded TPSID grant (HEOA, 2008), is tasked with enhancing and expanding inclusive post-secondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities through technical assistance and research. An important tenet of the TPSID projects, individuals with intellectual disabilities are engaged in and members of the academic and social fabric of their colleges and universities. To facilitate this inclusive membership as well as program sustainability, the use of natural or existing institutional courses and supports, rather than separate specialized supports for students with intellectual disabilities, has emerged in some Florida Institutes of Higher Education. The availability and use of inter-departmental partnerships, supports, and services will be discussed regarding student benefit and program sustainability.. After this session participants will be able to: 1. Identify the benefits in inclusive student support systems. 2. Summarize the sustainability and inclusivity of current institutional student supports accessed by all students. 3. Identify at least three current supports/systems/programs within their university, state college or career/vocational college that students with intellectual abilities might access to obtain their needed supports.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Becht

Kathleen Becht

Director of Florida Consortium on Inclusive Higher Education, University of Central Florida
My interests focus on parent issues, literacy for students with intellectual disabilities, and inclusive postsecondary education (TPSID)


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Preparing Preservice Teachers To Provide Students with Severe Disabilities Access to the General Education Curriculum: Teacher Educators' Definitions and Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

Teacher educators play a critical role in preparing prospective special education teachers to provide access to the general education curriculum for students with severe disabilities. This qualitative study investigated 11 teacher educators’ definitions of access to the general education curriculum and how the definitions influence their teacher preparation practices. Findings indicated that teacher educators’ definitions and practices are grounded in research, including an academic focus with high expectations in inclusive settings. Teacher educators prepare preservice teachers by sharing their values and philosophies, describing what is currently happening in local schools in comparison to best practice, and teaching them to be the change. The teacher educators’ definitions impacted what and how they teach about access to the general education curriculum at the preservice preparation level. Implications for future research and practice are provided.


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Qualitative Research on Supporting Students with Complex Communication Needs: A Meta-synthesis
Limited Capacity seats available

The ultimate goal of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is to promote studentsŸ?? active participation across settings through interactions involving a variety of partners and functions. To achieve such outcomes, educational teams must collaborate and consider the characteristics of students, their families, and the environments during AAC assessment and intervention. To date, AAC team collaboration has rarely been evaluated collectively outside intervention or case study research. We conducted a meta-synthesis reviewing qualitative studies of perspectives of team members on supporting students who used AAC in the U.S. public schools. Our analysis yielded three primary themes necessary for effective AAC services; inputs, activities, and outcomes. We discuss implications and recommendations for service providers and future researchers. Upon the completion of this session, participants will be able to (a) obtain a better understanding on synthesizing qualitative research and the implication of the logic model in providing educational services to students with complex communication needs; and (b) describe inputs, activities, and outcomes of effective AAC services in public schools as reported by educational teams.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Thursday December 1, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:00am

UMN Focus Group on HCBS 1 (Parents/Family Members)
Limited Capacity seats available

To participate, you MUST complete your Interest Form HERE 
Meet at the Registration Booth between 8:30 and 8:50 AM so we can escort you to the room. 

The following participants are listed:
Paula Hardin, Kisha Lee, Karen Kickham, Justine Steffens-Willis, Samantha Walte, Kim Nester 

The University of Minnesota (UMN) has a new RRTC on HCBS Outcome Measurement currently conducting stakeholder input. UMN's new Center is focused on improving the measures used to monitor services and supports funded through HCBS. The Center is truly focused on getting better person centered measures that are meaningful to people and that are psychometrically sound.

The Center has found success in getting participants from multiple states to participate  in stakeholder focus groups at conferences such as TASH. These focus groups are limited to 6 people for session. If you are interested in participating, please complete the interest form.

People interested in participating MUST meet one of following criteria:

  • Young adults with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Parent/Family Member of a young adult with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Young adult with I/DD with dual diagnosis (mental health/I/DD) 
Complete your Interest Form HERE 

Ypu can also copy and paste the link below:
http://member.tash.org/?page=UMNFocusGR16Conf


Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 9:00am - 11:30am
Presidential Suite 315 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

About a Boy, AAC, and Grown-ups: A Mixed Methods Study
Limited Capacity seats available

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) serves as a critical "gateway to equity" for individuals who cannot use speech to sufficiently communicate. We present the findings of a mixed methods study that examined the effectiveness of a supports package for a Kindergarten boy's AAC team in supporting the team's functioning and instruction, and, in turn, the child's communication. The supports package consisted of a structured team meeting to plan the team's AAC efforts and one-on-one coaching in evidence-based, systematic AAC instructional strategies. Mixing qualitative case study and experimental single-case multiple baseline across participants design study, we highlight key features of the team's journey around (a) their experience in collectively and individually working toward common goals for the child's communication development, (b) developing each memberŸ??s instructional competence with AAC, and (c) the child's communication. We present evidence from both methods to discuss how the team's work and the childŸ??s communication were supported by the intervention package. We also share accessible video and audio footage to support our conclusions. We discuss the implications of the findings for families and practitioners who are supporting AAC for children during the school years. After the session, participants will be able to:
  •  Identify seven key features to promote team functioning around AAC and how to address these features during team meetings.
  • Use three evidence-based instructional strategies to support AAC learning. Ÿ?? Describe a coaching model for supporting team membersŸ?? competence with these instructional strategies. 
  •  Describe the experience of one school team who participated in a team meeting and one-on-one coaching to facilitate their AAC efforts with a Kindergarten boy.

Speakers
avatar for Melinda Snodgrass

Melinda Snodgrass

Assistant Professor, Hunter College - City University of New York


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Building a Culturally Responsive Framework for Students with Intellectual Disability to Increase Postsecondary Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will provide a framework for assisting culturally and linguistically diverse students with moderate-severe intellectual disability. Strategies for general curriculum access, academic instruction, meaningful collaboration with families and educators, as well as suggestions for enhancing postsecondary outcomes will be provided. . 1. Participants will identify components of the proposed culturally responsive framework (universal design for learning, self-determination, safe learning environments, technology, multiple opportunities to respond, primary language support, integration of culture in learning, and systematic/explicit instruction) to assist CLD students with moderate-severe ID in the preparation of postsecondary opportunities. 2. Participants will summarize strategies to increase parental involvement during academic and transition planning. 3. Participants will identify various postsecondary opportunities that exist nationwide for students with moderate-severe ID.

Speakers
avatar for Bree Jimenez

Bree Jimenez

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Dr. Bree Jimenez is an assistant professor of special education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Jimenez has worked in the field of low-incidence disability for over 15 years. Dr. Jimenez designs and conducts research in the area of general curriculum access, specifically in adapted literature, mathematics, and inquiry science. She has published a book and written multiple textbooks chapters surrounding general curriculum... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Mims

Pamela Mims

Associate Professor, East Tennessee State University
Systematic Instructional, Access to the General Education Curriculum, Alignment, ABA


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Count Me In: Finding Inclusion in Personalized Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Today, more schools are using personalized learning as a way to meet academic standards while promoting student-driven interests. This presentation critically examines the impact personalized learning has on students with significant disabilities in K-12 schools. In particular, how an inclusive community is created through the work of teacher collaboration, peer monitoring and community support. Using case examples from schools studied in the Midwest, this presentation provides audience members with a critical look at these current practices in further detail.

Speakers
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Creating a More Diverse TASH: Building Cultural Competence within TASH Chapters
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share information about the California chapter of TASH's initial steps towards creating a more diverse and culturally competent CalTASH. The presenter will share information about the creation of a Committee for Cultural Competence and its goals and strategies as well as the challenges faced thus far. The remainder of the time will serve as a discussion session for generating new ideas and supporting those from other chapters who have similar goals. Participants will learn about the opportunity to participate in the Georgetown Leadership Institute for cultural competence and how it can better prepare them to create change within an organization. They will also learn about the specific steps one chapter has taken to become more diverse and culturally competent. They will understand some of the barriers to this work and will participate in the generation of solutions and new ideas.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Creating an Inclusive Environment
Limited Capacity seats available

The SWIFT Center, a National Technical Assistance Center for Inclusive School Reform, provides academic and behavioral supports to promote achievement for all students, including students with disabilities and those with the most extensive needs. Participants attending this session will understand research of successful inclusive schools, learn about tools created by SWIFT, and can immediately apply the information provided in this session to improve inclusive practices. All of the resources that will be shared are free and accessible via the SWIFT website (www.swiftschools.org). The SWIFT-Fidelity Integrity Assessment (FIA) is a tool school leadership teams can use to collect progress-monitoring data on implementation of the SWIFT domains and features. The SWIFT Field Guide provides access to tools and resources, such as videos, discussion guides, parent & family resources, and implementation examples. This topic is important because it facilitates the implementation of inclusive practices. The mission of the SWIFT Center is to improve outcomes for diverse groups of learners, including "struggling readers, gifted, living in poverty, students with disabilities, high achievers, culturally and ethnically diverse students, and those with the most extensive needs" (www.swiftschools.org). The SWIFT Center works with schools, districts, and states to transform systems so that all students receive the supports they need to fully participate in the general curriculum. Research shows that students with and without disabilities make greater academic progress when served in inclusive settings (Cole, Waldron, Majd, 2004; Dessemontet, Bless, & Morin, 2012; Cosier, Causton-Theoharis, 2013). The resources developed by the SWIFT Center and shared in this presentation are tools that schools and districts use to support diverse learners within a fully integrated educational framework, where specialized and general educators work together in collaboration with families within inclusive settings to benefit all students. The SWIFT framework is composed of research-based domains that are essential for inclusive school reform. For example, developing strong and engaged site leadership is necessary for sustaining inclusive school practices (Waldron & McLeskey, 2010). Furthermore, forming a multi-tiered system of supports is needed to match resources to student needs identified through data (Sailor, 2009). Integrating organizational structures allows resources to be distributed as needed by students in more inclusive settings (Sailor, 2009). Developing trusting family and community partnerships is related to improved academic outcomes (Bryan & Henry, 2012). Establishing inclusive policy structures helps remove barriers and ensure sustainability of inclusive reform efforts (Kozleski & Smith, 2009). The SWIFT-FIA and SWIFT Field Guide tools are free, in-depth, and intended to be used by school leadership teams to promote the practices of inclusion. This presentation will include school-based examples and ways in which leadership teams can apply the tools to their schools to support all students in the general education classroom. Examples of how schools can work collaboratively with families will also be discussed. 1. Participants will understand research of successful inclusive schools. 2. Participants will learn how to use free tools and resources from the SWIFT Center to improve inclusive school practices and collaborative relationships with families. 3. Participants will experience school-based examples and ways in which leadership teams can apply SWIFT tools to their schools to support all students in the general education classroom. 4. Participants will learn how to use SWIFT resources to engage families in the process of including all students in the general education classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica M Meisenheimer

Jessica M Meisenheimer

Research Project Coordinator, SWIFT - University of Kansas
Jessica Meisenheimer, Ph.D. has worn many hats in her years as an educator. She has taught first grade students to graduate students, worked in urban to suburban settings, and served as a general and special educator. Jessica’s current work as a Research Project Coordinator for Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT) Center applies her knowledge and experience for the benefit of diverse students across the U.S. She is... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Creating Community Lives
Limited Capacity seats available

Using principles of Asset Based Community Development, this interactive session provides innovative practical solutions that take an individualŸ??s interests and turn them into meaningful inclusion in their community. This session will provide attendees with tools to clear their path to inclusion, employment and increased community connections. Attendees will learn how to expand their interests, gifts and talents into real social connections. We will use a simple worksheet and local newspapers to show how opportunities for inclusion are available in typical community places. 1. Attendees will gain an understanding of Asset Based Community Development and uses toward strengthening self-determination and inclusion. 2. Attendees will discover strategies to increase their community connections and opportunities for integrated employment. 3. Attendees will map specific steps to take to participate in communities in valuable ways regardless of identified disability or limitations. 4. Attendees will understand impact of social networks on community living success. 5. Attendees will acquire tools to make use of opportunities to exercise control and identify resources in their community to sustain inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Patti  Becker

Patti Becker

Community Partnerships and Outreach, TMG by Magellan Health
Patti Jo Becker, M.S. brings more than 25 years of experience and passion to her current role. Her professional and personal life activities continue to influence the diverse fabric of self-directed long-term care supports. Patti’s work experiences include provider roles of direct support and management; consultant roles with families, advocates, and funding agencies as well as, advocacy in local, state and federal venues. Patti holds officer... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Creating Pathways to Employment & Community Integration
Limited Capacity seats available

The DC Department on Disability Services is engaged in a multi-year effort to advance the employment of people with intellectual disabilities. We have engaged in systems change so that at the moment a person steps into our front door for intake, we are asking them about their vision for employment. Service planning engages people and their families in a discussion about their interest in employment and results in a goal for each person to advance them on the pathway towards employment. The Developmental Disabilities Administration and Rehabilitation Services Administration partnered and created standard operating procedures to guide coordinated services between the two agencies. Our HCBS waiver services have new definitions and implementing regulations that require a customized employment Positive Personal Profile vocational assessment and a corresponding Job Search and Community Integration Plan for every person in day services. We will discuss how person-centered thinking formed the foundation of our systems change efforts; early positive results; the challenges we have faced along the way; as well as next steps to support employment first. . 1. Participants will learn about DC's systems change efforts to advance employment first. 2. Learn how DC has amended our waiver, regulations, policy and procedure to support people on their pathway to employment. 3. Understand the operating agreement between DDA and RSA to support people with IDD in competitive, integrated employment.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Creating Rigorous, Inclusive, Academic Lessons: Don't You Dare Dumb It Down!
Limited Capacity seats available

This session provides instruction on creating rigorous academic lessons for a diverse group of students, including those with complex support needs. The benefits of inclusive practices, universal design for learning, differentiated instruction, and culturally responsive teaching are becoming more widely accepted and proclaimed. There is no doubt that all teachers must be prepared to teach diverse learners in a variety of settings. It is important to ground all educators in the theory of inclusive practice and as provide them with specific practices to enact that theory in real life classrooms. There are resources available that address general ideas for differentiation and universal design for learning, resources that offer specific strategies but are categorical in nature, and resources that focus only on including one or two students with significant disabilities. While this one-at-a-time format is a start, we acknowledge that teachers are faced with the challenge of meeting many diverse cognitive, social, behavioral, cultural, and linguistic needs all at once. Yes, they may have one or two students with significant cognitive disabilities, but they will almost certainly also have students with IEPs for other needs, students with 504 plans, and students with diverse cultural and linguistic needs. Teachers need theory-to-practice strategies and lesson plan examples that show how lessons can be planned to include all of these students while maintaining high expectations, building community, managing the classroom, and meeting standards and IEP/504 goals. We will focus on the concept of Ÿ??clusteringŸ? student needs to better meet individual student needs. With clustering, teachers continuously reflect on key student patterns of learning and plan instruction to address the patterns of learning, as opposed to focusing merely on individual needs, which can be overwhelming and unattainable for a teacher in daily planning. This session introduces these lesson planning strategies and a bank of inclusive practices, based on universal design for learning practices, for fair, just, balanced, challenging classroom communities where all students are supported to reach high standards for academic content. After this session, participants will be able to: 1. Identify diverse, complex needs of students in inclusive classrooms; 2. Discuss the need to universally design learning to meet all needs; 3. Produce strategies that support studentsŸ?? cognitive, social, behavioral, cultural, and linguistic needs; 4. Explain how all strategies implemented Ÿ??ripple outŸ?? to support multiple students in inclusive environments; and 5. Design content lessons that fully include all students and support all needs.

Speakers
avatar for Susie Hildenbrand

Susie Hildenbrand

Associate Dean, St. John Fisher College
Dr. Susie M. Hildenbrand is the Associate Dean of the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education at St. John Fisher College and an Associate Professor in the Department of Undergraduate Inclusive Education Her research interests include positive classroom management, co-teaching in the inclusive classroom, inclusive practices for all students, service learning with preservice teachers, and creating trauma sensitive school communities. Susie may... Read More →
avatar for Whitney Rapp

Whitney Rapp

Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College
Whitney Rapp is an Associate Professor of Inclusive Education. Her areas of expertise are universal design for learning; positive classroom management and behavioral support; and planning and instruction for highly diverse, inclusive classrooms. Dr. Rapp is the author of Universal Design for Learning in Action: 100 Ways to Teach All Learners and the co-author of Teaching Everyone: An Introduction to Inclusive Education.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Deinstitutionalization: where are we?
Limited Capacity seats available

Our discussion team is comprised of an activist/advocate who founded and operated the Policy Committee for Deinstitutionalization in South Korea, a researcher who conducted a longitudinal study of deinstitutionalization for 28 years in the USA, and a professor in special education in the USA. All of us deeply engaged in deinstitutionalization movement in both countries. After briefly introducing current status and challenges of deinstitutionalization in both South Korea and USA, we will discuss and brainstorm with participants of critical issues pertaining to deinstitutionalization across countries. This presentation is directly aligned with the 2016 TASH conference theme, "Gateway to Equity", since "deinstitutionalization" movement itself is a gateway to equity for people with disabilities including severe disabilities and most countries have been experiencing some degree of challenges for deinstitutionalization as a part of community inclusion. 1. By the end of the session, participants will be able to summarize at least 5 challenges of deinstitutionalization in both South Korea and the USA. 2. By the end of the session, participants will be able to compare current status of deinstitutionalization in both countries. 3. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify and apply at least 3 support systems to minimize social isolation of people with disabilities who have been living in the community and 3 ways to measure "quality of life" adequate for people with very significant disabilities. 4. By the end of the session, participants will be able to discuss various issues related to different living models for people with disabilities.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Designing grade-appropriate instruction in general education for students with significant support needs
Limited Capacity seats available

In a case study format, educational teams in an inclusive elementary school piloted a formal weekly planning process to design and deliver general education content at grade level to four students with extensive support needs in their age-appropriate general education classes. The process included each week a planning meeting of ?? hour or less between the educators; a week-to-week allocation of material and human resources to assure participation and learning; and assessment of successes from previous weeks to guide future planning. The process was examined using an appreciative inquiry qualitative methodology. The results reported in this session show how teams can plan, design, and deliver general education content such that equity is achieved, regardless of severity of disability. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: (a) describe an ongoing planning process between general and special educators, plus paraprofessionals, that results in higher levels of immersion, participation, and learning for students with extensive support needs in their general education classes (b) describe the implementation of effective and nonintrusive human and material supports that contribute to immersion, participation, and learning in students with extensive support needs in their general education classes; (c) design practical processes for assessing immersion, participation, and learning in students with extensive support needs in their general education classes, regardless of severity of disability; and (d) identify specific adaptations to the described planning and implementation processes to fit the teaching and learning contexts in which the presentation participants themselves have to work in their own lives.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

9:20am

Don't Judge Me: Understanding Invisible Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

I am a self-advocate and a person living with two significant disabilities. I have grown up with Autism and Epilepsy. I was diagnosed with Epilepsy when I was 18 months old and diagnosed with Autism when I was 2 years old. Now that I am almost 30 years old, I have developed a passion for bringing awareness to helping people better understand and serve people with invisible disabilities (Autism, Epilepsy, Anxiety, Depression, etc.) to help break the stigma that I have had to deal with growing up. In my presentation, I will make participants more aware of the struggles and the joys of living with invisible disabilities and come to a conclusion on how we, as a TASH community, can help people with invisible disabilities live more productive lives. My presentation lines with TASH's theme "Gateway to Equity" by making everyone aware that everyone should be included. There is so much emphasis a lot of times on physical disabilities because they are "seen" but there needs to be more focus on the invisible disabilities that are "unseen" so that everyone can live out the principles of equity, equality, belonging, and inclusion. By the end of the session, participants will be able to explain how understanding people who live with invisible disabilities relates to them having a better quality of life. By the end of the session, participants will be able to critique the strengths of people with invisible disabilities. By the end of the session, participants will be able to respond by taking actions to help people with invisible disabilities feel more accepted by society.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Ecological Systems Factors Affecting Access to General Education Content and Contexts
Limited Capacity seats available

Each day, people who serve students with significant disabilities collectively and individually make decisions that affect these students' access to general education content and contexts. This presentation will use Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory to examine and call attention to factors that facilitate or restrict access to general education contexts and curriculum. Specifically, we will discuss student characteristics (i.e., race and age, disability label, and learning and behavioral characteristics), microsystems (i.e., special education teachers, paraprofessionals, and peers), mesosystems (i.e. Individualized Education Program [IEP} teams), exosystems (i.e., teacher education), macrosystems (i.e., policy), and chronosystems (i.e., school transitions) to illustrate how actions and activities within students' ecological systems influence important educational decisions about placement, instructional contexts, and instructional content. Implications for practice, policy and research as well as advocacy for positive changes at each level of the ecological systems model to support access will be considered. Participants will have the opportunity to brainstorm how to utilize the ecological systems framework to advocate on behalf of students with significant disabilities at their own schools. By the end of the session, participants will be able a) to identify actions and activities in students' ecological systems that influence the students' access to general education content and contexts, b) to recognize barriers to access for individual students as well as trends within local and national contexts, and c) to apply the ecological systems framework to promote positive action on behalf of students with significant disabilities at their own schools.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Effective Employment Support - Findings From Interviews With Support Professionals
Limited Capacity seats available

This session has been cancelled.

State and national policies like for example "Employment First" are essential for creating an infrastructure of programs and services geared toward promoting employment of people with disabilities (Harkin, 2012; GAO, 2010; Mank & Grossi, 2013). However, without at the same time delivering top quality support services to job seekers with disabilities, this population will continue to struggle in achieving meaningful employment and economic self-sufficiency (Drake & Bond, 2008; Johnston et al., 2009; Test & Cease-Cook, 2012). This presentation will address the conference strand of "Innovative practices in integrated employment" by sharing effective support strategies as described by 16 employment consultants (in 12 states) who were nominated for a study on effective employment support strategies and who were interviewed in the summer of 2015. The voice of family members and job seekers interviewed will be shared as well. Moreover, an emp loyment consultant will talk about his experience supporting job seekers. Finally, a self-advocate will provide additional insights about what works and how to improve employment support services. Among others, the audience of this presentation is likely to include directors of employment programs, supervisors of support professionals, support professionals, job seekers, and family members. The take home message for this audience includes a greater understanding of effective employment support strategies as described by professionals and other key players based on the most recent findings from research. The take home message for job seekers, self-advocates, and family members will be a greater awareness of the key role that they can play in shaping the services available to job seekers. After this presentation: 1. Support professionals will be familiar with the most recent findings about effective employment support strategies for getting to know job seekers, finding jobs, involving family members and other key players, and making decisions. 2. Job seekers and family members will better understand the central role that they can play in promoting job seekers' career advancement.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Research Associate, University of Minnesota


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Effective Inclusive Classrooms: 6 Techniques for Improving Inclusive Teaching and Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Over more than a decade, researchers have noted that a lack of personnel preparation to provide quality inclusive services to students with disabilities and their families is one of the primary barriers to serving students in the least restrictive, most inclusive environments (King-Sears, 1995; Holdheid & Reschly, 2008). Achieving a Gateway to Equity in schools requires purposeful in-service professional developed designed to support all education, general and special education, to create and sustain inclusive learning environment for all students. The Inclusive School Community Project (ISCP) focused on ways teachers, general and special education, construct inclusive classrooms where students with disabilities learn, experience meaningful participation, a strong sense of belonging, and full class membership. In this recent demonstration project, general and special educator teams received professional development and coaching on 6 techniques for fostering effective teaching and learning in inclusive classrooms. These techniques addressed instructional collaboration, specific teaching and learning practices, and enriched parent involvement. Coaching was the key lever for bridging teacher training to classroom practice that resulted in a positive impact on student participation and sense of belonging in the inclusive classroom. This presentation will start with an overview of these six techniques. We will then take an in-depth look at how to apply the techniques and the benefits for students. Through this demonstration project, educators constructed high-quality inclusive classrooms, built reciprocal relationships between students, parents, and educational partners, and experience results. This session will share the results of this project, lessons learned, and recommendations for replication. After this session, participants will be able to 1. Identify six inclusive teaching/learning techniques to apply in the classroom. 2. Identify 2 strategies for improving collaboration with parents. 3. Describe the characteristics of effective instructional collaboration.

Speakers
CW

Carla Williams

University of Missouri Kansas City


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Inclusive education for students with complex health care needs: Moving forward together!
Limited Capacity seats available

The proposed structured discussion will be formatted as outlined below. During open discussion the presenter will moderate the discussion, by ensuring that participants who want to speak are given an opportunity. If there is a lull in the discussion, the presenter/moderator will encourage participation by asking open-questions directly related to what other participants have shared. 8-MINUTE INTRODUCTION TO THE TOPIC Brief overview of existing policy statements (e.g., American Academy of Pediatricians, Council for Exceptional Children) and research on inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs. Brief description of how inclusive education for this population connects to the TASH theme ƒ??Gateway to Equityƒ? and supporting this population to live ƒ??a fair, just, and balanced life.ƒ? 3-MINUTE GETTING TO KNOW EACH OTHER AND GROUND RULES Session participants will be asked to raise their hands to identify what group they identify with (e.g., parent, self-advocate, teacher, therapist, researcher). Ground rules for the session will be outlined: (a) Give others the opportunity to speak (e.g., do not talk over others); (b) Respect each otherƒ??s point of view; and (c) Keep the TASH theme ƒ??Gateway to Equityƒ? in mind. 8-MINUTE OPEN DISCUSSION FOR QUESTION ONE What are the current issues and challenges in schools around inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs? 8-MINUTE OPEN DISCUSSION FOR QUESTION TWO How can schools address the issues and challenges identified in order to promote inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs? 8-MINUTE OPEN DISCUSSION FOR QUESTION THREE How can schools respond to studentƒ??s and their parentsƒ?? diverse backgrounds and perspectives (i.e. race, culture, sexual orientation, gender expression, or socioeconomic status) when implementing inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs? 8-MINUTE OPEN DISCUSSION FOR QUESTION FOUR How can schools implement inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs in order to support this population to live ƒ??a fair, just, and balanced life?ƒ? 3-MINUTE CLOSING The presenter/moderator will summarize key points discussed. The presenter/moderator will inquire with session participants if there is a shared interest in creating a special interest group on the TASH website and/or Facebook page to continue to build connections, share information and resources, and passion for inclusive education for individuals with severe disabilities complex health care needs. This session proposal aligns with this yearƒ??s TASH theme by (a) facilitating session participants to form connections with each through sharing and dialoguing on inclusive education for student complex health care needs; (b) by focusing the discussion session strategies to promote inclusive education for this population, and (c) by explicitly connecting the discussion to TASHƒ??s theme.. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: a) summarize key issues and challenges in promoting inclusive education in schools for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs b) discuss strategies schools can use to redress barriers to inclusive education in schools for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs c) discuss how schools can respond to diverse perspectives and backgrounds when implementing inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs d) discuss how schools can implement inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs in order to support this population to live ƒ??a fair, just, and balanced life?ƒ? 3) develop connections with other session participants, and understand different viewpoints and experiences related to inclusive education for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Readiness, Response, and Reaction: Addressing School Emergencies with Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Children with disabilities are highly vulnerable in emergency situations. They require more preparation and assistance to fully participate in emergency plans and procedures (Balbus, & Malina, 2009); yet their needs often are inadequately addressed in school emergency plans (Boon, Pagliano, Brown & Tsey, 2012). They also are likely to experience difficulty executing emergency plans. For example, children with physical disabilities can be less likely to act proactively and/or meet physical requirements for evacuation (Van Willigen, Edwards, Edwards, & Hesse, 2002), while children with cognitive disabilities may not recognize signs of environmental threat or become anxious and confused in response to emergency signals (Kailes & Enders, 2007). Children with disabilities also can experience adverse, psychological and physical reactions after an emergency (Somasundaram & van de Put, 2006). The purpose of the proposed presentation is to conduct a discussion regarding preparation, reaction, and responses to school emergencies for students with disabilities from an educational, law enforcement, and counseling perspective. A special educator, a mental health police officer, and college counselor will share experiences and ideas for proactively managing school emergencies for students with disabilities. Participants will be involved in discussions regarding current preparedness, identifying needs for specific students in terms of physical environment and school context, and planning for support of psychological and physical needs of students with disabilities following an emergency. This presentation aligns with the conference theme ƒ??Gateway to Equityƒ? by examining the needs of students with disabilities during school emergencies. Schools must be adequately prepared in emergency situations to protect the safety of all individuals they serve. . Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to ƒ?› Examine causes of school emergencies within their communities ƒ?› Distinguish between the current status and the proactive approach required to include children with disabilities in school emergency planning ƒ?› Identify supports for students with various types of disabilities and their caretakers during emergencies ƒ?› Design supports that are consistent with law enforcement and first responder objectives during an emergency ƒ?› Summarize means for proactively addressing studentsƒ?? psychological, physical and behavioral needs following an emergency.


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

RPSD Associate Editor Meeting
Associate Editors will meet to discuss the status of the journal and make plans for the coming year.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Red Caps Union Station Hotel St. Louis

9:20am

Providing Full Inclusion: Enhancing Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

For many typical students, participation in extracurricular or afterschool activities provides rich and memorable experiences. Regrettable, relatively few students with severe disabilities participate in such activities, despite several benefits they provide: promotion of full inclusion and social acceptance and natural opportunities to practice IEP goals. The purpose of this presentation is two-fold. First, a synopsis of current research about this issue is presented. Second, a discussion about the barriers to such participation and ways to ameliorate the situation are presented. In particular, how such participation is influenced by gender, cultural diverse background, socio-economic status, and student support needs are addressed. 

Objectives:



  1. By the end of this session, participants will describe the extent to which students with severe disabilities participate in extracurricular activities, the barriers that present them from participating, and the kinds of activities that are supported. 




  1. By the end of this session, participants will describe the extent to which extracurricular activities are included in IEPs and what are the specific outcomes addressed. 



  2. By the end of this session, participants will explain how involvement in extracurricular activities can be promoted. 



  3. By the end of this session, participants will be able to determine how participated is affected by gender, diversity, socio-economic status, and support needs. 


    By the end of this session, participants will describe the factors that motivate parents to want their children involved in extracurricular activities. 

Research Background:

This presentation summarizes current knowledge about the participation of students in extracurricular activities and evidence-based practices to promote such involvement. 

Importance:  For many students, participation in extracurricular activities represents their most enjoyable school experience. Such activities provide opportunities to promote inclusion and social acceptance and practice IEP goals. Nevertheless, relatively few students participate in such activities. Participation in extracurricular activities is a potentially valuable and underused means to achieve full inclusion. 

Translating this content into improved outcomes: The purpose of this presentation is to inform TASH members about barriers that deny students opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities, and to suggest ways in which participation can be facilitated and supported. Increased participation will potentially produce desired academic, social, and functional learning outcomes for participating students. 

Methodology: It is well acknowledged that students with severe disabilities continue to remain socially isolated, with limited opportunities to participate in socially integrated activities outside of the classroom. Although participation in extracurricular activities would appear to be practical and efficient way to ameliorate this situation—a natural and evidence-based practice that serves as a “Gateway to Equity”—it is an underused service.  The presentation will review and discuss a number of quantitative and qualitative studies about extracurricular activities conducted by the presenters. Recommendations to enhance participation will be presented First, Agran et al. (in press) surveyed a sample of special education teachers (n= 146) from a mix of rural, urban, and suburban communities across five states. Descriptive data were reported. A major finding of the investigation was that respondents had strong beliefs about the value of extracurricular activities, but felt it was not their responsibility to facilitate or support afterschool activities. Last, relatively few parents request that their children participate in extracurricular activities.  Pence and Dymond (2016a) surveyed 60 middle and junior high school special education teachers. Data from surveys were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0). Results indicated that teachers valued including students in school clubs and believed that students benefitted from engaging in club activities, yet they did not view this setting as a place to address curricula. Issues with supports, transportation, and planning were identified as barriers to participation.  In a second study by Pence and Dymond (2016b), a multiple case study design involving three high school students was used to explore the participation of students with severe disabilities (SD) in inclusive extracurricular school clubs, as well as their motivation for involvement. Preliminary findings suggested that focal students oftentimes participated differently than their peers, with limited preparation for their involvement. Peer members were also found to play an essential role in facilitating students’ ongoing engagement in club activities.  Thoma et al. (2016) interviewed 19 participants (9 teachers, 3 parents, and 7 students) across three states, asking them to share their opinions about extracurricular activities. Three members of the research team reviewed the transcripts, using an a priori coding method. The majority of interviewees valued extracurricular activities but identified a number of problems (e.g., parent lack of interest, lack of teacher interest, transportation, scheduling). Additionally, the findings of an ongoing survey being conducted by Agran and Dymond (2016; projected completion, October) will be presented. The study involves a stratified national sample of special educators i.e., teachers who serve students with severe disabilities in middle, junior high, and high schools. Both descriptive and statistical analyses are being employed. Among the questions asked are: What difference does participation make; Are activities and related skills being included in IEPs, and how are outcomes measured?; Is participation differentiated by gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, support needs, and classroom placement?; and what are the benefits of participation parents want their children to achieve? 

 

Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 1, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Art Inspired Academy - Changing Lives through the Creative Arts
Limited Capacity seats available

Opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities to express themselves creatively in inclusive settings are often difficult to find. This session will explain how Abilities First created a business model through Art Inspired Academy (AIA) to provide inclusive creative arts classes, and how this business has changed the lives of its students and the community. Students have developed and performed original theater productions, created murals that are on display in local businesses, and were given an opportunity to express and communicate in new ways. They have also made friends, gained confidence, developed social and prevocational skills, and learned to work as part of a team. In addition to social skills, woven into the classes are opportunities to improve fine motor, gross motor, communication, intellectual development, and in general a better understanding of the human condition. Individuals who do not have disabilities enjoy the classes and come away with new friendships and a greater understanding of acceptance and diversity. AIA offers art, music, dance and movement, and theater classes for children and adults. Each class is open to anyone, whether they have a disability or not. AIA staff members are former Service Coordinators, Teachers and Habilitation Specialists, trained to work with students with significant disabilities and behaviors. AIA also works with many volunteers, so every student who requires one-on-one assistance to complete the class is able to receive it. Working with volunteers from local universities from a variety of fields of study (music therapy, theatre, social work and education) allows multiple demographics to learn more about diversity and inclusion within the Fine Arts. Funding sources for AIA include private pay, Medicaid Waiver, and the Southwest Missouri Autism Project. Scholarships have also been received from Friends of Abilities First and CC Links, along with local fundraising efforts. AIA classes are held in various locations around Springfield, including several churches and Drury University. We are working with community partners to offer classes through the Boys and Girls Club for the next school year. Abilities First is not aware of any other program like Art Inspired Academy anywhere else in the United States. 1. After this session, participants will understand how the use of inclusive creative arts can be used to help individuals achieve their goals and participate in their community. 2. After this session, participants will have the knowledge needed to return to their communities and implement inclusive opportunities in their community.

Speakers
JL

Jennifer Larson

Assistant Executive Director - Operations, Abilities First


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

HCBS, Community Living & Day Services: How to do it
Limited Capacity seats available

One agency and the people they support will share their stories of how to provide person-centered supported living and community day services where people are included in community settings which fully meet the HCBS Waiver Rules. Discussion topics will also include systems change strategies for agencies and programs to move from segregated services to inclusive community services by implementing person-centered practices in order to comply with new federal regs. Participants will be able to: summarize the shared stories of how to provide person-centered supported living and community day services; to explain community settings which fully meet the HCBS Waiver Rules; discuss systems change strategies for agencies and programs to move from segregated services to inclusive community services; and comply with new federal regulations.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Shepard

Scott Shepard

Director, Avenues Supported Living Services
Scott Shepard is the Executive Director of Avenues Supported Living Services, a non-profit agency which provides community living and personalized day supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in North Los Angeles County. With Avenues SLS, we had the opportunity to begin services one person at a time, and it took ten years to reach our goal to support twenty people in their own homes and community. Since that time, we... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

High School General Education Teachers' Knowledge of Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

As the need for more inclusive practices are more prevalent, students with various disabilities are being educated within our area high school with same age peers. However, one population of students have less opportunities. The majority of students with severe disabilities are being educated in a self-contained setting for the majority of the day, learning from a functional life-skills curriculum. Results of this study, a survey design, investigated high school general education teachers' knowledge of terminology, practices, and supports related to teaching students with severe disabilities. The findings emphasize the need for more professional development and supports to teach students with severe disabilities in inclusive settings.

Objectives:
a. Through participation of this presentation, participants will be able to: a. Describe high school general education teachers' knowledge of terminology related to teaching students with severe disabilities.
b. Describe high school general education teachers' knowledge of supports for teaching students with severe disabilities.
c. Describe high school general education teachers' knowledge of evidence based practices for teaching students with severe disabilities.
d. Discuss discrepancies in high school education teachers' knowledge and identify areas for professional development opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Allison Kroesch

Allison Kroesch

Assistant Clinical Professor & Doctoral Student, Illinois State University
avatar for Kristin Joannou Lyon

Kristin Joannou Lyon

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

How the voucher/charter school movement undermines equity and inclusion: Evidence from Ohio
Limited Capacity seats available

The voucher/charter school movement continues to damage capacity and support for community based public inclusive education. Across the country the development and proliferation of vouchers and charter schools has steadily progressed despite resulting inequities, segregation, poor educational practices, and fraud in this private takeover of education. Ohio, which leads the country in developing charter and voucher schools specifically developed for students with disabilities, provides a particularly useful vantage point for understanding why and how this is occurring. Over 27,000 students with disabilities in Ohio now attend charter schools, many of whom attend segregated "autism units" and alternative schools for students with emotional/behavior issues and learning disabilities. This movement happened relatively quickly, with limited resistance. Opposition is slowly growing, but primarily focused on low achievement scores. More extensive research in Ohio documents how charter development decreases property values and school spending on instruction and teachers (Cook, 2016). In this discussion, we examine the powers, ideology, and Ÿ??rent seekingŸ?? strategies behind this movement including alliances between government, financial, philanthropic, and corporate sectors that are driving it. More specifically, we present empirical and theoretical evidence connecting voucher/charter school movement with the kind of corrupt market practices that caused the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008. While there is now widespread acknowledgement of how financial and banking sectors have weakened the economy and enriched themselves at public expense, few see the same mechanisms driving the school Ÿ??choiceŸ? / charter school movement. We argue that both are manifestations, of what economists call rent seeking (appropriating public recourses for private gain without creating additional wealth, or public benefit). Both subprime mortgages and charters promised shortcuts to provide greater choice, opportunity, excellence, and equity for all. We present evidence that they have, in fact, provided just the opposite in Ohio. Voucher and charter schools have not only failed to provide equity and excellence but actually continue to perpetuate inequality, segregation, while undermining public education and damaging the very communities they claim to preserve. We argue that it is not sufficient to simply point out the excesses and failures of the charter school movement without a grounded theory as to why this is happening and more detailed understanding of the broader implications and economic mechanisms at work. Using Ohio as a reference to understand and resist the process described above, this discussion will be structured to critically examine the charter school industry in terms of: 1) the nature and impact of its rent seeking practices; 2) specific legislative interests, tactics, and outcomes; 3) the seductive nature of the language deployed via terms like "choice;" and Ÿ??free market;" and 4) the challenges and complexities of providing educational options that promote inclusive public education in impoverished and segregated communities. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) recognize how the notions of "free market" and "school choice" are being used to cloak the pernicious outcomes of rent seeking deployed by moneyed interests in privatizing education; b) describe how this process is especially relevant to students with disabilities; and c) discuss options and implications for public, democratic, inclusive education

Speakers
avatar for Frank Fitch

Frank Fitch

Professor emeritus University of Cincinnati Clermont College


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

I'd have my own train; Conversations on Advocacy, [through] Communication, and Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation highlights the ways that students with autism who type to communicate position themselves and each other as ???advocates?? in dialogue with one another and the researcher as a collaborative inquiry group. Together, the group spent time constructing, engaging in, and even complicating individual and collective acts of advocacy (actions they often described as ???teaching??) through public self-representation, direct consultation, and art-making. To illustrate the different (sometimes conflicting) ways in which the overarching topic of advocacy emerged as part of this larger narrative inquiry, this presentation will highlight illustrative conversations and a culminating collaborative art project that, literally, made visible these individual and collective notions of advocacy. It will also elaborate on the practical implications of these students??? perspectives on advocacy and approach to crafting inclusive experiences through conversation and community building. 4) Identify ways to make space for student participation in constructing inclusive practice

Speakers
CW

Casey Woodfield

Hussman Institute for Autism
Casey Woodfield is currently an Associate Clinical Researcher at the Hussman Institute for Autism. She earned her Ph.D. in Inclusive and Special Education Program in the Teaching and Leadership department at Syracuse University. She also holds a Master’s degree in Cultural Foundations of Education and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Disability Studies from Syracuse University. Her academic, professional and personal interests most closely... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

I'm a Free Man! - Process of acquiring my guardianship and making my own choices
Limited Capacity seats available

"I'm a Free Man!" were some of the first words Ahmad shared after regaining his guardianship in May of 2016. Ahmad is a recent graduate from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro's 4 year certificate program in Integrative Community Studies. Join us to hear about the journey of Ahmad and his family over the past 27 years. We will share about our experiences, the power of networking, overcoming difficulties, and setting high goals. By the end of the session, participants will be able to 1. identify the importance of building strong relationships and connections which lead to a meaningful life 2. Identify specific ways to allow someone to make choices of their own without taking full guardianship 3. demonstrate an understanding of additional options to guardianship and how to provide support as needed 4. Identify the importance of allowing one to make their own choices and learn from natural consequences

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Academic Success Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Beyond Academics
Alison DeYoung is currently the Academic Success Coordinator at the University of North Carolina Greensboro in the Integrative Community Studies 4-year certificate program. Alison has been a disability rights advocate since 2006 when she began working in the field of education and transition during her undergraduate studies. In 2010, she graduated with a Master’s degree in Severe & Multiple Disabilities from the University of Arizona. Upon... Read More →
avatar for Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman

Student, Beyond Academics
Hi! My name is Ahmad Rahman. I am a senior at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in the Integrative Community Studies certificate program. I'm excited to attend the TASH 2016 conference and present my portfolio.


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Identifying the Individual: Young Professional Panel Discussion Examining Titles, Inclusion, and Community
Limited Capacity seats available

Identifying the Individual speaks directly to the central themes presented by the 2016 TASH Conference: Autonomy, inclusion, self and external respect, self-advocacy growing towards active citizenship, a unique sense of Disability Community, and the concept of true togetherness will all be explored by a diverse and engaging panel of young professionals with disabilities. Starting with a more subtle glance into personal background and preferences of descriptive terminology, the panel will delve deeper, eventually touching on issues of bias, cultural and systemic perception as it relates to oppression, and eventual progress desired in what "disability" will someday mean to society from the up-and-coming self-advocate professionals. Following participation in this immersive. discussion-based session, attendees will be enabled to: a.) Effectively learn, explain, and distinguish key concepts surrounding personal and societal identifiers. b.) Acknowledge underlying, obscured, and pervasive barriers to inclusion surrounding the modern ways in which individuals are titled and referred. c.) Educate and empower other self-advocates, families, and professionals on positive methods used to better understand and communicate with people with disabilities. d.) Easily understand and discuss issues of Disability Identity, Learned Helplessness, Self Awareness/Worth/Pride, Disability Affirmation, Systemic Oppression, and Communal Attachment. e.) Develop workable action plans towards increasing agency and community awareness, communication, and inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mellenthin

Daniel Mellenthin

Tri-County Advocacy Specialist, Resource and Product Coordinator, DMH Dept of DD STL Regional Office, SPAN-RAISE Project
Daniel Mellenthin, MS, CRC | Daniel serves as Tri-County Advocacy Specialist for DMH St Louis Regional Office, providing individual, family, agency, and systemic advocacy and skill-building across St Louis City, Jefferson County, and St Charles County. He also works as SPAN (Statewide Parent Advocacy Network) Project and Resource Coordinator, leading workgroups for resource and product development, managing website and social media productions... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices at Home Resulting in Increased Independence and Communication
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation describes a case study focused on addressing challenges and leveraging facilitators to effective partnership with parents and implementation in home and community settings. Through the perspectives of a parent and University partners we describe a process for developing, implementing, and analyzing a communication and independence program for a young girl with a significant intellectual disability and functional blindness. Implementation by the parent of evidence-based practices supported deeper inclusion and independence of their child in home routines and community activities. After this session, participants will be able to:
1. explain and reflect on opportunities for their application of a process for collaborating with parents on their implementation of a communication program at home,
2. list the steps to teaching a child with significant disabilities communication skills through the exchange of objects,
3. describe strategies for supporting families in their use of evidence-based practices (e.g., time delay, structured work systems) by embedding independence focused skill development throughout home routines,
4. reflect, from a parent's perspectives, on the challenges and facilitators to effective partnering and implementation of evidence-based practices in the home and consider implications for application in their settings.


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Importance of Hygiene Skills: The 'how to keep clean' lessons for students with Autism
Limited Capacity seats available

When working with children with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities, it is important to teach why hygiene, and keeping clean is important. It is also crucial to teach them why it is important to have good hygiene. Most students with disabilities are not aware of the importance of personal hygiene, and have to be taught the Ÿ??how toŸ?? in a concrete manner. Some of them need to be independent on how to keep clean, and why to be clean as society look at them in a different manner (Sitlington & Clark, 2006). Personal hygiene takes a long way to success and raising self-esteem, by feeling good about yourself. By keeping body clean makes you feel good about yourself. BY smelling good, wearing clean clothes, polished shoes, using deodorant, neatly combed hair, and brushed clean white teeth, helps make friends, being hired at job sites for adolescents and also keeping jobs. Good personal hygiene should be taught as a skill to be independent for younger students with special needs. For older students this skill will teach them self-care, modesty and responsibility. Moreover, adolescence is the time hygiene contributes to keeping relationship, dating and job security. This presentation on hygiene skill is for individuals with disabilities. The lessons focusŸ?? on providing engaging and interactive lessons for students with ASD and similar disabilities. Transition research tells that students lose their jobs due to lack of social skills such as personal hygiene (Flexer et al, 2013). Ÿ?? The participants will learn how to teach usefulness of hygiene to students with ASD. Ÿ?? The attendees will learn benefits of teaching hygiene to students with special needs. Ÿ?? The research will discuss ways to teach oral hygiene, bathroom hygiene Ÿ?? By the end of the session, participants will learn all aspects social rules related to hygiene for students with special needs. Ÿ?? By the end of the session participants will understand the importance to address hygiene and related behaviors for children with ASD and related disorders.

Speakers
avatar for Sujata Norman

Sujata Norman

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER, ALBERTVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
I have been a teacher for nearly 25 years. I have taught in three continents and five countries. I have been handling students with behavioral issues and reading on mindfulness and yoga. I have conducted a pilot study using a specific mindfulness based intervention and will be conducting my PhD dissertation study in few months.
AW

Amy Williamson

CrossingPoints Coordinator, The University of Alabama


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

10:20am

Improving the Engagement of Students as Partners in Effective Classroom Learning Systems
Limited Capacity seats available

Special School District of St. Louis County (SSD) has adopted the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence Education Criteria as their continuous improvement framework. For more than 5 years, SSD has been implementing the principles and practices of continuous improvement throughout the district, or as they often say, "From the Board Room to the Classroom". Hear from staff about what it takes to create and sustain a high-performing learning system, one that engages students and families as partners and promotes the inclusion of student voice within classroom learning systems. Participants of the session receive practical tools and resources to support the implementation of student data folders, and the engagement of students in the creation of a classroom mission and goal setting, as well as strategies for recognizing achievement. Impact of these approaches will be shared. Participants of this session will be able to: a) explore one districtŸ??s approach to engaging students in classroom culture and day to day activities b) gain specific strategies, tools and resources to increase student engagement, allowing for students to have voice and choice within their learning by being engaged in setting the culture of the classroom and the study of both class and individual student data.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Inclusive Education for Preschool Learners with Autism: A Program Evaluation
Limited Capacity seats available

Overview of both the process and outcomes of a current early childhood program located in the Midwest regarding inclusive education for preschool learners 3-5 yrs. of age that have a diagnosis of autism. I will be discussing the two new tools utilized in the research study and the preliminary results found that will be published in my dissertation. These tools that measure both process and outcomes have never been utilized before in this field. By the end of the session, participants will be able to a) understand the effects of Leaders & Practitioners beliefs, feelings & behaviors on teaching preschool learners with autism in inclusive settings.. b) explain the barriers of inclusive practices c) Discuss new strategies/tools that will assist in changing mind sets and the "inclusive" culture of schools.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Self Determination and Planning your own Life
Limited Capacity seats available

A Holisitic Approach to planning for your own life. As many states change from vendored to self determination type programs, how can the person best self evaluate their own life and create a plan for the future using the new model.. * Learn about how the disability support systems are changing in the upcoming years * How can we focus on normalcy vs a very regimented life when it comes to people with special needs when a person with disabilities becomes an adult. * In what ways will the system change in terms of the some of the new medicaid regulations.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Hinkle

Stephen Hinkle

Self Advocate, Self Employed
Stephen is a self advocate, person with autism and a current online facilitator for Lesley University. Stephen is a graduate of Northern Arizona University with a masters degree in special education disability policy. Stephen obtained his undergraduate degree from San Diego State University in Computer Science. Stephen is an international speaker has spoke in 24 states, plus Australia over the last 16 years. Stephen's audiences have included... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Self-advocate engagement in managed care program implementation; Access creates Equity
Limited Capacity seats available

Early versions of managed care had been described as imposing services on people rather than working with them to design better coordinated and integrated support. What changed? In the recent iteration of managed care program design, companies have learned to ask people with disabilities and families what works best for them. In this presentation, members of the Anthem Disability Policy Engagement Team, the National Advisory Board (NAB) on Improving Health Care Services for Older Adults and People with Disabilities and self-advocates will discuss the ways Amerigroup /Anthem has learned to listen, engage and respond to self-advocates in order to support them to plan and implement services and supports that work for them and their families in the community, at work and at home. . ƒ?› Participants will learn about the structures that Anthem / Amerigroup has established to engage with their members with disabilities. ƒ?› Participants will explore several strategies for informing managed care what works that they can implement in their states. ƒ?› Participants will provide feedback to presenters on how to improve self-advocate and advocate engagement in managed care programs.


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Teachers' Views of their Preparation for Inclusive Education and Collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to gather information about teachers' views of their preparation or readiness to demonstrate skills associated with inclusive education and collaboration. This study included the use of a survey that was sent electronically to general and special education teachers at six schools in one district. Additionally, interviews were conducted with three teachers to explore their preparedness for inclusive education and collaboration in greater depth. The results of this study can be informative for stakeholders in teacher preparation and professional development, as a way to improve and increase inclusive practices. The results shed light on specific aspects of inclusion and collaboration in which educators report to be prepared. Additionally, the results suggest components of inclusive education and collaboration in which teachers may benefit from ongoing support in order to practice. While teacher training needs regarding inclusive practices can pose a challenge, examination of the specific skills associated with inclusive education and collaboration could enable key stakeholders to identify areas of opportunity for training and support of both pre-service and in-service teachers. 1. After this session, participants will be able to identify the skills related to inclusive education and collaboration that teachers report being highly prepared and less prepared to demonstrate. 2. After this session, participants will be able to explain the importance of focusing on specific aspects of inclusive education (e.g. adaptations, planning for implementation of IEP goals) as topics for professional development and ongoing support and coaching. 3. After this session, participants will be able to describe differences in reported preparation based upon the educatorsƒ?? number of years prior teaching experience, number of years prior experience including students with significant disabilities, and previous coursework and training in inclusive practices.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
I am a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with significant disabilities in the general education classroom, teacher preparation to implement these supports, and collaboration with... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

The Journaling Journey: Self-Reflection and Impact on Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

Self-reflection is a critical component of teaching; yet, many educators do not objectively view their practice outside the scope of their specific discipline. This presentation will show how journals were used for a cohort of graduate students - in special education and other educational disciplines - to reflect on their leadership skills as they pertain to students with significant support needs. Students chronicled their journeys as they critically reflect on their current belief system and their future educational leadership roles in relation to students with severe disabilities. After this session, the learner will be able to: a) discuss the benefits of using journals to encourage self-reflection; b) discuss examples of how self-reflective journals can impact practice; c) identify steps to determine thematic journaling prompts.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

What Pre-service Teachers Learn About Disabilities From Inclusion Literature
Limited Capacity seats available

To counter possible misconceptions and stereotypes, teacher education programs have experimented with the integration of narratives written by or about individuals with disabilities into required special education coursework. This presentation shares the results of a qualitative study examining the impact of this literature on nontraditional pre-service teachers. As future educators in inclusive environments, their understandings of disability have a direct impact on the educational experiences of children within the classroom setting. After this session, participants will be able to: 1) identify the characteristics of nontraditional college students. 2) describe the genre of inclusion literature. 3) detail the results of a qualitative study examining the impact of inclusion literature on nontraditional pre-service teachers. 4) consider the larger impacts of this study for teaching practices in teacher education programs.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Kode Sutton

Kimberly Kode Sutton

Special Education Program Coordinator, York College of Pennsylvania


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Research and Publication Committeee
Limited Capacity seats available

Annual meeting of the committee to consider agenda for following year and to plan changes in Connections

Moderators
Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Red Caps Union Station Hotel St. Louis

10:20am

Enhancing the IEP Meeting Process: The Good, The Bad, and The Suggestions
Decades of research identify the need to improve the IEP meeting process for families and students with disabilities. The purpose of this panel will be to present key research-based practices aimed to enhance the IEP meeting process. Specifically, we will present the following promising practices: (a) a tiered IEP meeting model for family and student support that embeds student facilitated practice, parent support, shared-decision making, and alternative dispute resolution practices; (b) practices for supporting culturally and linguistically diverse families; (c) the importance and use of advocates; and (d) quality of life planning through the lifespan. In keeping with the “Gateway to Equity” TASH theme, attendees will walk away with a collective understanding about the importance and relevance of connecting key stakeholders to innovative practices designed to enhance the IEP meeting process in an effort to renew the field of special education for the ultimate benefit of students with disabilities.

Objectives:

 As a result of this session, the participants will:
1. Summarize the past four decades of research about parent and student experiences with the Individualized Education Program Meeting  
2. Integrate a continuum of parent and student friendly conflict prevention and resolution practices into their pre-existing knowledge about the Individualized Education Program Meeting process.
3. Describe the characteristics of effective special education advocate training and practice. 4. Identify culturally and linguistically diverse practices aimed to support parents and students throughout the Individualized Education Program Meeting.
5. Describe Individualized Education Program planning practices aimed to support individuals through the lifespan (e.g., employment, education, and life skills).   

Research Background:

The purpose of this panel is to present parent and student friendly strategies used to enhance the IEP meeting process. 

Importance: Research indicates most IEP meetings lack student involvement, parent input, culturally and linguistically supportive practices, individualization, and effective transition-focused planning. Because the IEP is an evolving process aimed to prepare students for successful futures, there is a noted need to enhance this practice for the field. 

Translating this content into improved outcomes: Through this presentation, the  "what" and "how" of the IEP document and meeting are aligned and defined to empower stakeholders to actively participate using a collaborative approach. This collaborative framework is encouraged throughout research, supported through the spirit of IDEA, and can potentially ameliorate existing problems with the IEP meeting.  

Methodology: This panel will present findings from four different research studies, including (a) a tiered IEP meeting model; (b) practices for supporting culturally and linguistically diverse families; (c) the importance and use of advocates; and (d) quality of life planning through the lifespan.   For the purposes of clarity, the panel chair will lead in the discussion based on a qualitative phenomenology research study, specifically qualitative interviews to explore parents, parent advocates, educators, administrators, and facilitators’ experiences with IEP and Facilitated IEP (FIEP) meetings. Until this study, FIEP meetings were recognized for dispute resolution practice and defined as a process using a trained impartial facilitator to attend and facilitate an IEP meeting to ensure all team members are equal contributors and to assist the team with active problem solving, interacting respectfully during disagreements, and maintaining focus. While the FIEP meeting is recognized as a dispute resolution option, very limited research about the model exists.   Using purposeful sampling techniques, we interviewed 32 parents, parent advocates, educators, administrators, and facilitators representing 13 different states across the US who had experience with the IEP and FIEP meetings.   Interviews were one hour long, audiotaped, and took place over the telephone. Interviews followed a protocol; however, they were open-ended with follow-up questions asked as needed. Each audiotaped interview was transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a sequential three-step qualitative analysis process using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. This process involved reading through the transcripts line-by-line and applying an open code to the data. The second stage of data analysis, axial coding, used the established open codes and classified them according to conceptual categories identified across the interviews. The last stage, selective coding, involved reviewing the code categories and identifying which categories were prominent in more than half of the transcripts. These categories were also collapsed into larger themes. We then selected quotes to illustrate the themes.   Participant experiences with FIEP meetings were overwhelmingly positive. One noteworthy finding was that the participants’ negative experiences with non-facilitated IEP meetings directly contrasted with their positive experiences with FIEP meetings, with participants sharing that FIEP meeting practice can be a valuable tool used to enhance IEP meetings in general. In fact, many educators shared that their experiences and training on FIEP meeting practice positively affected their non-facilitated FIEP meetings, even without an external facilitator involved.   Additionally, two major defining categories specific to an emerging FIEP model surfaced. First, the model encompasses collaborative components for conflict prevention and dispute resolution (i.e., facilitator skills, focus on the student, consensus building). Second, the model utilizes procedural practices (i.e., pre-meeting, agenda, norms/ground rules, visually charting, and a parking lot) that were described as enhancing the organization and outcome of the IEP meeting practice itself.   The participants’ positive validation of FIEP meetings indicated this model might be a valuable process that can be used to both prevent and resolve conflict between parents and educators. Data resulted in an emerging and promising IEP meeting model for researcher and practitioner use.  
 

Speakers
TG

Tracy Gershwin Mueller

Tracy Gershwin Mueller, Ph.D., BCBA-D | Professor, MA Intervention Specialist Coordinator | College of Education and Behavioral Sciences | School of Special Education


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

11:20am

Opening General Session- Gateway to Equity I

The General Session Panel will take questions from the audience via Twitter. Please use the following hashtags: 
#2016TASHConf 
#tashgs1


As parents, the ultimate goal is to prepare our children for the workforce as a way to ensure financial security for their future. Often policy and business leaders have conversations and roll out initiatives to ensure schools are preparing students for adulthood and life. Specifically, that they have the fundamentals to successfully transition from education to the workforce.  Whether it is evidence based or simply a cultural perception, parents feel that their children being part of a prepared workforce is key to a successful life.

If we adapt some of the attitudes and practices of people in the general public, we may be more successful at aligning the work that takes place in the formative years of our children. To do that, we need to have a cultural shift within our community. We cannot compartmentalize the work that we do as transition experts, inclusive education experts, community living providers, etcetera. Instead, we need to improve the way we align our work throughout the lifespan. Our counterparts in the general population do not compartmentalize the world the way we do.

Our panel includes people who work in the field, self-advocates and family members who recognize the need for a better alignment between school and the workforce. They will discuss how current legislation can be utilized to improve this alignment, and their perspectives as end users. 


Moderators
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Speakers
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →
avatar for Animesh Shah

Animesh Shah

Animesh Shah, M.B.A is on the board of directors for Missouri – TASH, which is a chapter of TASH ,a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with disabilities. | | He is also a dad to a 12 year old daughter who happens to have Rett Syndrome. Animesh served as the Maryland State Representative for International Rett Syndrome Foundation, and was Executive director for St. Louis ARC. He holds a degree of an M.B.A... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 11:20am - 12:50pm
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:00pm

UMN Focus Group on HCBS 2 (Young Adult)
Limited Capacity seats available

To participate, you MUST complete your Interest Form HERE 

The University of Minnesota (UMN) has a new RRTC on HCBS Outcome Measurement currently conducting stakeholder input. UMN's new Center is focused on improving the measures used to monitor services and supports funded through HCBS. The Center is truly focused on getting better person centered measures that are meaningful to people and that are psychometrically sound.

The Center has found success in getting participants from multiple states to participate  in stakeholder focus groups at conferences such as TASH. These focus groups are limited to 6 people for session. If you are interested in participating, please complete the interest form.

People interested in participating MUST meet one of following criteria:

  • Young adults with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Parent/Family Member of a young adult with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Young adult with I/DD with dual diagnosis (mental health/I/DD) 
Complete your Interest Form HERE 

Ypu can also copy and paste the link below:
http://member.tash.org/?page=UMNFocusGR16Conf

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 1:00pm - 3:30pm
Presidential Suite 315 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:10pm

Inclusion Means Diversity & Cultural Competency Symposium
Limited Capacity seats available

In this symposium, researchers will present their findings on issues of cultural and linguistic diversity and discuss the impact of social and systematic factors on students and their families’ ability to access inclusive settings, as these are often intricately interconnected with the families' culture. Researchers will also provide suggestions for working with culturally diverse families.

Research Teams and Topics:
  • 1:10- 1:15 PM- Introduction facilitated by Natalie Holdred 
  • 1:15-1:55 PM Transition Experiences of Spanish-speaking Families. Grace L. Francis,  Judith M.S. Gross,  Kelly Casarez-Velazquez
  • 1:55-2:35 Unsettling the resettled: Autism, race, religion, and socio-economic status intersect in the Somali diaspora. Diana Baker, Hyejung Kim
  • 2:35-3:15 Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Social Skills Interventions for Children with Autism.Hyejung Kim, Rachel Saffo 
  • 3:20-4:00 Examining culturally and linguistically diverse families' engagement in the special education process. Zachary Rossetti, Meghan M. Burke, Janet S. Saue
  • 4:00-4:15 Q&A, Reflections, Discussions - reserachers and audience- Facilitated by Natalie Holdred 
Presentation Descriptions:

Transition Experiences of Spanish-speaking Families
This presentation highlights the experiences of Spanish-speaking families as they assist their family members gain competitive employment in their local communities. Participants will learn about barriers to competitive employment, as well as strategies for overcoming barriers. Participants will identify key barriers diverse families identify as preventing competitive employment  Participants will identify how families and practitioners partner overcome barriers to competitive employment   Participants will identify strategies they can immediately employ to capitalize on family strengths and existing services to overcome or prevent barriers to competitive employment.

Unsettling the resettled: Autism, race, religion, and socio-economic status intersect in the Somali diaspora
Increasing numbers of Somali-born American children are being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (e.g., Miller-Gairy & Mofya, 2015). In fact, some research has suggested that children of Somali origin born in Europe and North American are disproportionately likely to develop the condition (e.g., Bagia & Kung, 2014; Fernell, Mohammed, Martin, Bagenholm, & Gillberg, 2015). Studies have shown that American-born children Somali origin with autism are more likely than their white monolingual English-speaking counterparts to receive late diagnoses, inadequate services (e.g., Miller-Gairy & Mofya, 2015) and to have co-morbid diagnoses of intellectual disabilities (Hewitt et al, 2013). Little research has examined the challenges that arise when Somali-born parents and American-born educators come together to make educational decisions and develop individualized educational programs (IEPs) for children with autism. The present study was designed with the intersectionality framework in mind and examined the interactions among race, ethnicity, language, ableness, religion, and socio-economic status (SES) in the special education planning process.  This study uses a multiple baseline design (e.g., Yin, 2009) to examine the experiences of three Somali-American mothers of boys with autism and paired American-born educators as they go through the IEP development process and attempt to determine mutually agreeable educational goals for the students. Results reveal several important themes.  To start, while the educators take an essentially “colorblind” approach to educational decision-making, race is at the forefront of family members’ experiences and is an important factor in terms of educational planning. In addition, when educators perceive that family's beliefs are based on "they often opt for a hands-off approach in attempt not to be culturally disrespectful, which can lead to diminished communication. Finally, families who participated in this study are very different from one another in terms of educational backgrounds, migration trajectories, and financial resources. These differences point to the meaningful ways in which various identity categories intersect and shape the participants" educational trajectory.  This study provides important implications for practice. Currently, Somali American students with disabilities and their families face many structural obstacles to equitable participation in special education decision-making. This study makes visible the many barriers and suggests practices that may serve as a gateway to more equitable engagement of this group as well as other groups of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Participants will be able to  (1) articulate how various identity categories (e.g., race, ethnicity, social status, religion, immigration history, dis/ability) can intersect and influence experiences with the special education decision-making process; (2) apply the themes that emerged from this study in thinking about their own experiences with diverse students in schools; discuss and describe emerging best practices related to educational decision-making in the context of family members and educators from different cultural backgrounds.  

Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Social Skills Interventions for Children with Autism
Given the rapidly growing number of students with autism from diverse cultural communities in the United States, researchers have steadily emphasized the importance of developing and implementing culturally responsive interventions and practices. Unfortunately, there is no clear understanding of culture and diversity in the field of special education, nor are there guidelines to intertwine students' diversity with the practical process of interventions. The purpose of the article is to discuss effective approaches to consider the cultural responsiveness and social validity of social skills interventions to accommodate increasing needs of students with autism from non-dominant cultural and linguistic communities. Understanding an individual's ecological contexts and needs as well as social validation of interventions among a student's cultural contexts or communities can provide vital information about the contextual fitness of the interventions and further promote feasibility and sustainability of the interventions. Recommendations for practices and research are discussed. By the end of the session, participants will be able to (1) understand the importance of culturally responsive intervention research; (2) address implications for practice such as the need for ecological understanding of socially situated educational backgrounds to assure effectiveness of intervention for students with autism.

Examining culturally and linguistically diverse families' engagement in the special education process
Family engagement in special education has been federally mandated for over 40 years. Unfortunately, research has consistently shown that the federal mandate is not being met for all families. This Research Symposium will share results from three research studies that examined the engagement of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families in the special education process and identified barriers to and facilitators of meaningful engagement. This focus aligns with the conference's "Gateway to Equity" theme in that meaningful family engagement is a critical component in improving the effectiveness of special education programs and maximizing inclusive education. After this session, participants will be able to (1) describe the legal mandate of parent participation under IDEA;  (2) summarize the need for supporting meaningful engagement of CLD families during the special education process; (3) identify research-based interventions and approaches to support meaningful engagement of CLD families during the special education process. 

Moderators
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction

Speakers


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:10pm - 4:15pm
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Cultivating Potential: Discovering What Is Possible
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the course of our careers, spanning a combined 50 plus years in this field, we've noticed a consistent gap between what we find important for the people we provide services to, as compared to what is important for the other people involved with that person. Parents, neighbors, friends and direct support professionals all play a major role in the lives of people experiencing disability, and as such, we believe it is equally important to honor and create vision for and with the entire team of support...not matter your role. We will delineate between Person Centered Practice and Person Centered Thinking through the sharing of stories. In sharing our stories we provide a lens into the practical application of Person Centered Thinking and see what is truly possible for people when we stop and take the time to value everyone involved. We hope people walk away with a new sense of how to view the entire team of support. Person Centered Thinking should be the foundation for everything we do. It should not be limited to that of just the person being supported, rather, Person Centered Thinking should permeate the entire team.

Speakers
BG

Beth Gallagher

CEO, Life Works
avatar for Kirk Hinkleman

Kirk Hinkleman

Associate Director/Co-Founder, Life Works/Kinship Project
Talk to me about human connection...


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Desperately Seeking Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel of nonspeaking autistics, who spell on letter boards or keyboards to communicate, will describe their ongoing struggle for inclusion in general education. Huan Vuong, Ian Nordling, Tom Pruyn, and Matthew Lager are autistic teens who have advocated for themselves through numerous requests, IEP meetings, and demonstrations of their cognitive abilities to be allowed access to meaningful education. Despite their self-advocacy, they have met consistent refusal to accept their use spelling/typing as a means of communication and therefore have been unable to successfully participate in inclusive education. The panelists will share their stories along with strategies to support the communication of nonspeaking autistics in general education. . Understand the difference between speech and cognition. Recognize acceptance of all communication as fundamental human right. Learn strategies to include nonspeaking students in general education.


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Michigan Habilitation Supports Waiver - Compliance with CMS' HCBS Rules
Limited Capacity seats available

The Michigan Habilitation Supports Waiver (HSW) provides Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) supports to approximately 7,800 Medicaid beneficiaries who would otherwise require an institutional level of care facility for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. In partnership with the Developmental Disabilities Institute (UCEDD) at Wayne State University, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services designed four instruments (health plan; residential provider; non-residential provider; and participant) to assess compliance with the HCBS rule for these waiver beneficiaries. Ten health plans and a randomized statewide sample of 727 beneficiaries, 393 residential providers, and 407 non-residential service providers participated in the pilot data collection. Findings address perceptions of all four entities with regard to their compliance with the HCBS ruling. In particular responses from the participants and their service providers were compared to identify areas of agreement, discrepancy, and mismatch. Regional differences in responses were identified to assist the State agency in quality management. Validity and reliability of the data were examined through on-site visits. Remediation processes were developed and disseminated to local agencies. Finally, survey tool refinements were made in preparation for full scale assessment which began in 2016. The presentation will provide an interactive opportunity to understand and discuss Michigan's pilot study. a. Provide an overview of the survey development process and implementation methodology b. Highlight key survey findings and the validation process c. Describe how local services providers are utilizing the pilot survey data for transition to compliance d. Share information about the next phase of data collection

Speakers
avatar for Angela Martin

Angela Martin

Developmental Disabilities Institute, Wayne State University


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Mobile technologies as a ateway to independence and social connection
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the last five years, mobile forms of technology such as the iPad have been instrumental in enabling individuals with disabilities to use technology in the same way as people without disabilities. This presentation will discuss the different ways that mobile technologies can support greater independence and social connection for adults with disabilities. Strategies for teaching the use of mobile technologies through apps in the areas of internet access, reading, writing, communication, recreation and time management will be discussed. A self-advocate who has used an iPad extensively for communication and employment will share his experiences. 1. Explain why access to mobile technologies like the iPad are essential to independent living and inclusion in the community. 2. Describe the different ways in which mobile technology can be used to increase a a personŸ??s independence and social interaction in everyday life. 3. Identify the key elements of support that are necessary for a person to effectively use technology. 4. Identify possible barriers to the use of technology with adults with developmental disabilities. 5. Describe how mobile applications in the areas of communication, literacy and independent living can be used with adults.

Speakers
PC

Pascal Cheng

Communication Specialist, Howard Center


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Moving the Field Forward: Revitalizing the MAPs Process in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

This session focuses on creating opportunities for families and schools to push the field forward by facilitating opportunities to participate in the MAPs (McGill Action Plan) process. Although the MAPS process has been used throughout inclusive education, teacher preparation training programs are not often trained in the process. Recent research indicates that through training, teacher candidates often gain a deeper understanding of the studentŸ??s support system, future goals and aspirations, and ways to facilitate and work with families to create access to these goals. Additionally, this session will discuss and emphasize the importance of the process in bridging the gap between family/school/community linkages and create opportunities to continue the conversations. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1) Understand and identify the core principles of the MAPs process 2) Discuss the importance of the MAPs process in facilitating family/school/community linkages 3) Identify ways to facilitate the MAPs process with teachers, families, and community members.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Naturally-Occurring Interactions of Elementary Students With Complex Communication Needs Across School Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

The aim of this study was to describe the naturally-occurring communication opportunities of students using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. We observed twenty-three students for a total of 116 hours across general education, special education, and non-academic settings. For each communication event, we recorded the setting, communication partner, student communication mode, availability of the aided AAC system, independent or prompted responses, and the consequence. Communication events primarily occurred with adults providing opportunities for students to respond in the special education classrooms. Less than 10% of events, students were observed spontaneously initiating toward adults or peers. On average, all students were presented with 17 opportunities to respond per hour. However, during 54% of these opportunities, the student did not have access to his/her AAC system. After this session, participants will be able to define the problem with the supports students using AAC encounter in the schools After this session, participants will be able to discuss the critical need for more communication supports for students who use AAC in elementary schools After this session, participants will be able to summarize current research highlighting the current trend of communication opportunity in schools for students with complex communication needs. After this session, participants will be able to engage in conversation with their school staff to ensure better ways for students that use AAC to communicate across school settings and with different partners. After this session, participants will be able to identify ways in which they can engage in behavior change themselves to ensure quality communication opportunities for students who use AAC.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Optimized Inclusive Practices: Assessment Tools and Resources for Facilitation
Limited Capacity seats available

The Optimized Inclusive Practices (OIP) Framework was developed by the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) to provide a description of big ideas, concepts and competences needed in a system that promotes inclusive practices for all students, with a special focus on those with low incidence and significant cognitive disabilities. The framework describes competencies across eight areas of practice and 4 levels of focus (district, school, classroom and student.) An Assessment Process aligned to the OIP Framework was disseminated in 2015-16. This process includes Big Idea and Concept Level Assessment Tools that can be used by facilitators to effectively lead school-based teams in assessing system status related to Optimized Inclusive Practices. The goal of the OIP Assessment Process is to identify programmatic strengths and needs at the district, school, classroom and student levels related to OIP and to develop/implement action plans to move the program closer to Optimized Inclusive Practices. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of the OIP Assessment Tools and process for educators, school leaders, parents or consultants who might be interested in learning more about the process and possibly working with school-based teams OIP facilitators. The overview would include: Ÿ?? A brief review of the OIP Framework Ÿ?? A review of the OIP Assessment Process and Tools Ÿ?? A review of the online course module developed by PaTTAN to train/support OIP facilitators (which includes free access to the OIP Framework and all OIP tools and resources developed by PaTTAN) Ÿ?? Examples of how participants could use the OIP Assessment Process and Tools in their own educational practice As an IDEA funded entity, all of the tools, resources, courses and materials are free, accessible and available to any who are interested. Although OIP was developed in Pennsylvania and there is a special focus on the population of students with low incidence and significant cognitive disabilities, the OIP Framework and Assessment Process has great applicability for optimizing inclusive practices for all students in all schools. Identify the relationship between the OIP Framework and the OIP Assessment Tools Describe the five-step OIP Assessment Process and the OIP Facilitator Role in that process Identify ways that OIP Assessment Tools could be used to lead teams in discussions and ratings of current program status related to Optimized Inclusive Practices Identify a variety of facilitation, problem-solving and brainstorming strategies and tools to effectively facilitate team discussions Identify ways that the OIP Action Planning Process could support teams in developing effective action plans related to Optimized Inclusive Practices Explain how to access and navigate the online OIP Assessment Tools and materials

Speakers
avatar for Marcia Thomas

Marcia Thomas

Educational Consultant, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN)
I am currently an Educational Consultant with the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) which is part of the Pennsylvania Department of Education. I work on several statewide special education initiatives: Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities, Inclusive Practices, Project MAX, Alternate Eligible Content and Procedural Safeguards. I have been in the field of special education for over 30 years as a teacher... Read More →



Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Parent Leaders as the Gateway to Equity
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive Education needs strong parent leaders to both advocate for the systems changes that make inclusion possible and to ensure its ongoing success. Strong Parent Leaders have been at the forefront of the Inclusion movement and until the day comes where all people are fully included in all aspects of community life we must continue to educate and develop the leaders. Understand how to develop and maintain a high quality Parent Leadership Program for parents of children with disabilities; understand how to develop and sustain a high quality Parent Mentor Program and how to foster ongoing leadership for parents of children with disabilities within a public school district.


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Participatory asset mapping: Using community resources to strengthen schools and their families
Limited Capacity seats available

Trusting family-school partnerships and trusting community-school partnerships are two integral features of the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT). Family-school partnerships support the engagement of families in the life of the school and strongly influence student outcomes. Community-school partnerships often provide supports and resources to meet staff, family, and student needs that go beyond what is typically available through schools. Supporting families to access community resources can serve to strengthen trusting family partnerships. For this to occur, schools must be aware of the organizations in their community that provide services and supports for students and their families. In addition, creating partnerships with community organizations increases resource availability, thereby maximizing resources, for communities and schools. As a part of SWIFT???s technical assistance to its partner states, we engaged in a participatory resource mapping process to identify community organizations external to the education system in each SWIFT partner state that (a) share in the values of inclusive schools and communities and (b) are perceived as key partners by other disability, family, or community organizations within the state. State schools and districts can use the resource map to identify potential partners and refer families to needed supports and services. Participants will learn about the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT) and, in particular, the Family and Community Engagement domain. Participants will learn how the SWIFT national technical assistance center on inclusive schooling is supporting state partner schools and districts to access and form partnerships with family and community resources.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

1:30pm

Partnering with the Workforce System: Achieving Employment Outcomes through WIOA
Limited Capacity seats available

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) creates opportunities for people with disabilities to benefit from the services of the workforce system, including people on waiting lists and people concurrently receiving school, developmental disabilities or vocational rehabilitation services. LEAD Center staff will discuss activities that promote partnerships and programmatic access to American Job Centers (AJCs) for people with disabilities and others with barriers to employment, as required by WIOA. This includes projects that introduce Guided Group Discovery (GGD) and Self-Guided Discovery (SGD) into the workforce system, as part of Customized Employment, conducted in partnership with job-seekers and AJC partners from vocational rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, behavioral health, independent living, etc. GGD provides a small group with peer-to-peer support as they identify their interests, skills and contributions, and conditions for employment, resulting in an individual Ÿ??blueprintŸ? to guide them as they begin or continue their search for employment. SGD enables a job-seeker and their support network to identify their ideal conditions for employment and develop a career plan, with help from a facilitator/coach at key points in the process. Participants will: (1) Learn about the opportunities created by WIOA for people with disabilities. (2) Explore Guided Group Discovery and Self-Guided Discovery approaches, and ways in which they can open doors to partnerships with AJCs and other key partners. (3) Identify the people who would most benefit from these approaches and strategies. (4) Identify the ways in which both approaches enable job seekers to build and use expanding networks of people to assist in their job search. (5) Explore ways through which agencies can best partner with the workforce system to jointly support job-seekers with disabilities to achieve competitive integrated employment.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

People of Color with Disabilities: Research and Systems Change
Limited Capacity seats available

In the pursuit of colorblind approach to policy, services and research, significant information about the disparate experiences of People of Color with Disabilities (PoCwD) is frequently overlooked. The paucity of information contributes to poor quality of life outcomes (health, mortality, education, employment, incarceration...) and exclusion. This interactive workshop will (1) explore the complexity of needs of PoCwD and families coming from cultural and/or linguistic diverse backgrounds; (2) describe effective, culturally responsive the service models; (3) identify needed research and strategies to include PoCwD in design and evaluation and (4) propose a cultural brokering model - a best practice model in addressing these service access gap for PoCwD. At the conclusion, participants can list and explain at least five examples and contributing factors of quality of life disparities experienced by PoCwD; describe three topic areas that warrant research; discuss elements of effective, culturally competent service models and interventions; organize structured advocacy for PoCwD inclusive and focused research; and identify opportunities for systems change.


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

Perceptions of Inclusion Practices by Teachers in Rural Areas.
Limited Capacity seats available

This research was a survey that was sent out nationaly to special education teachers, general education teachers, administrators and pre-service teachers in both special education and general education programs. The purpose of this survey was to learn more about perceptions of inclusion in rural areas, as well as how inclusive practices are implemented in areas with few resources and supports for special education students. This presentation will report the findings to the field as well as give recommendations in how to encourage inclusion in rural areas and support inclusion. The goal of this presentation is to identify what supports are needed in order for inclusion to be implemented in rural areas. Learners will come away with knowledge on barriers as well as ideas on how to successfully implement inclusive practices.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

1:30pm

What are the Essential Elements of Inclusive Education Necessary for Educator Preparation?
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will offer an overview of research evidence of educators who serve as inclusion specialists for students with significant disabilities. We will propose emerging areas needed among highly effective special educators who support inclusive practices. The session will devote time for discussion and feedback to generate essential elements for consideration among educator preparation programs. 

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Creating a Vision for Your Life
Limited Capacity seats available

Money plays an important role in everybodyƒ??s life. Everyone needs financial education and other opportunities to better understand how to manage money and save towards our individual goals. In this session you will identify a goal that you have for yourself and explore how to earn, manage, and save money to meet your goal. You will also hear from a self-advocate on their success in building their money skills. During this session, we will complete the following activities: 1. Mini-Vision Board Activity a. Identify a goal that you have for yourself? b. What is the cost to reach your goal? 2. First Money Memory Activity 3. What are some of your needs related to money? a. What are strategies for meeting your money needs? b. How can you earn more money and save your money, even when you need to keep a public benefit? This session is intended for self-advocates and their allies but is a fun, interactive session for anyone interested in building their money skills. . 1. As a result of this session participants (self-advocates) will be able to share a goal they have identified. 2. As a result of this session participants (self-advocates) will be able to better understand the need to save money towards their goal. 3. As a result of this session participants (self-advocates) will be able to better understand ways to save money that will not result in a loss of public benefits.


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Disability and Poverty: Reasonable Recommendations to Increase Economic Mobility
Limited Capacity seats available

Individuals with disabilities are twice as likely to live in poverty than non-disabled individuals. In the recent year much attention has been given to the issue of poverty in America. However, the conversations seem to be lacking in terms of addressing the prevalence of poverty among individuals specifically. National Disability Institute (NDI) has done a great deal of work to examine the current and historical financial statuses of individuals with disabilities and their families. Additionally, NDI has identified many of the characteristics related to public policy that are thought to cause poverty among this population. This session will not only shed light on the connection between poverty and disability, but will offer a slate of public policy recommendations that would begin to address this issue which is prohibiting millions of individuals with disabilities from realizing economic mobility and financial self sufficiency. These recommendations will span an array of policies from employment, to asset building, and financial literacy. Moreover, the recommendations will be policies that predominately have documented bi-partisan support. . Learning objectives include: - The state of individuals with disabilities, and their families, with respect to economic status and poverty - Explanations to account for such a significant prevalence of poverty among the disability community - Recommendations of reasonable public policy solutions to begin to address the issue of poverty among individuals with disabilities and their families.


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Right of Tenancy - the Transformation of a Legacy Residential Services Agency
Limited Capacity seats available

Community Living Services (CLS) is a large nonprofit corporation serving metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. CLS promotes community inclusion, full citizenship, and a "self-determined life" for nearly 4000 people of all ages with developmental disabilities. CLS is a legacy organization originally formed 33 years ago to help people move out of state run institutions into the group homes developed in the community.  CLS is the largest single Medicaid Habilitation Supports waiver provider in the state serving persons with significant disabilities.  CLS has undertaken significant transformation over the past 20 years.  In early 1990s CLS oversaw 250  6 bed licensed group homes, housing over 1400 people. In 2016, 85 group homes remain housing 376 people, 1200 people are supported in their own home and the remaining 1400 are supported within their family. This presentation tells of the actual steps taken, built on the principles of Self-determination, to shift control away from provider operated systems and professional guardianship agencies to people who in growing numbers live in homes they own or rent, with housemates and support staff of their choice. Consequently, the changes made in operations have also resulted in CLS being proactively aligned with the HCBS rules.   This will also be described during the course of the presentation.  

Objectives:
 After completing this session participants will be able to:
1. Recount the 5 operating principles of self-determination.
2. Identify the mechanism used to bring each principle to practice.
3. List 4 ways control is shifted from the agency to the individual served.
4. Describe 3 techniques used to maintain and grow a base of support during transition.
5. Recognize 5 key qualifications emanating from the final HCBS Rule and how CLS is meeting them.  


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Services access for Culturally Linguistically Diverse Families goes beyond translation and interpretation
Limited Capacity seats available



    As a nationally recognized Parent Training and Information Center, the Federation for Children with Special Needs (FCSN) has successfully applied the cultural brokering to bridge the communication and cultural gaps working with families coming from culturally linguistically diverse (CLD) background. The FCSN collaborates with community-based organizations who serve CLD families to ensure that services the FCSN provides are culturally linguistically appropriate services. Many factors like language barriers, cultural difference, and social stigma has a great impact on how CLD families access services for their beloved. Cultural brokers may serve as intermediaries at the most basic levels bridging the cultural gap by communicating differences and similarities between cultures. They may also serve in more sophisticated roles mediating and negotiating complex processes within organizations, government, communities, and between interest groups or countries.




 Participants will:          





  • Understand the culture brokering model and learn to use this model  



  • Reflect on  how one's own culture and belief system may influence relationships with individuals and organizations  



  • Learn about the role of, skills and characteristics of a cultural broker 



  • Learn about the real situation where the cultural broker can play vital roles 





Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

SMILE Intervention: Increasing Social Engagement for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Middle School
Limited Capacity seats available

SMILE (Social Mechanics Integrated in the Learning Environment) is a social skills intervention designed to deliver social skills lessons taught by adults combined with promptings by peer mediators to increase social engagement with middle school students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) through natural social interactions occurring during the lunch period. Two of the six participants in the study spent time in a self-contained setting, and often ate lunch in the Special Education classroom. The goal of the researchers was to have the students eat lunch with their same age peers at the lunch tables where all the students in the school eat their lunch. The peer mediators involved in the study volunteered to be a part of the intervention, and invited other students with disabilities, not involved in the study, to eat lunch with their group of friends. The intervention allowed a gateway for the peer mediators to allow all the students in the Special Education program and other students in the school to eat lunch together and interact with equality and respect. Attendees will be able to implement the SMILE intervention for students with ASD at the elementary or middle school level in any setting where social interactions naturally occur (e.g. school, home, play date, church). Attendees will be able to discuss specific benefits for peer-mediated social skills interventions for students at the middle school level, and how to implement the intervention with sensitivity for mediators and participants. Attendees will be able to replicate the described study while addressing described limitations, if desired, for future research.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Hartzell

Rebecca Hartzell

Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
I am a PhD student at the University of Arizona. My area of interest in social engagement in students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Emotional Behavioral Disorder (EBD). I will be presenting on a study for middle school students with ASD and EBD utilizing prompting through peer mediators.


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Socio-sexual education for individuals having ASD: Here's what I want you to know...
Limited Capacity seats available

Session cancelled.

This session will present the results of a qualitative study involving self advocates with ASD about what/how/when they would like to learn about social/sexual information. Using case examples, session participants will identify pertinent socio-sexual content and strategies for implementation. As a result of this session participants will be able to: 1. Identify socio-sexuality issues that may arise for individuals with ASD 2. Identify socio-sexuality curriculum content for individuals with ASD at various age levels 3. Describe instructional strategies that can be used to teach socio-sexuality curriculum 4. Create a strategy to infuse self-advocacy into socio-sexuality education

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Stop and Think: Comprehension Self-Monitoring in Inclusive High School English-Language Arts Classes
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, we will describe the results of a mixed-method (single case design and qualitative methodology) examination of the effects of a comprehension self-monitoring strategy on four students' ability to ask and answer their own questions about texts, and their membership and participation in their general education English-language arts class. Using adapted versions of the texts used in their classes (e.g., To Kill a Mockingbird; Othello) we used systematic instruction to teach students to respond to a visual cue to "stop and think" and ask themselves a question. Using visual and written supports, the students generated and responded to comprehension questions throughout the text. All students met criterion following systematic instruction, and supports were faded for two of the students. In addition, qualitative observations and interviews were analyzed to understand the effect of the intervention on the students' membership and participation in their general education English-language arts classes, as well as teachers' self-efficacy and expectations about student outcomes. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: 1) Explain and implement the "stop and think" strategy. 2) Identify the relationship between engagement and learning in general education English-language arts classes and students' membership and participation in those classes. 3) Explain the challenges associated with providing systematic instruction on general education content in general education classes for students with significant disabilities. 4) Identify areas in need of future research in relationship to literacy instruction in general education classes at the secondary level.


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Sugar Rush Bakery a Student Success Story
Limited Capacity seats available

Our project is the Sugar Rush Bakery, which is a student led venture that provides our 18-21 year old students identified with cognitive and physical disabilities functional, vocational skills where real life economic experiences are taught and learned through weekly planning, purchasing, baking, selling and accounting of home-made bakery items. Every student is incorporated into this project regardless of personal limits. It is my belief that every individual has something to contribute to this Bakery and it is our job to play up those talents to their fullest potential. We will present the successes and sustainability of our project over the past 4 years which includes receiving 2 separate grants totaling $3000.00 from a professional standpoint as well as the impact this program has on students, families, and the community in which it affects. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify Resources for Grant Writing; increase knowledge of assistive technology and adaptations available to individuals with significant needs; identify cost-free , creative promotional web resources; taste quality home-made peanut free bakery items; gain ideas for simplifying instruction; gain information on behavioral supports for including individuals with the most challenging behaviors.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Merrill

Diane Merrill

Teacher of students 18-21 years old, Meadowood Transition Program Red Clay School District, Wilmington, Delaware
I've been a classroom teacher of students with cognitive, behavioral, physical, challenges for over 26 years. I've worked with preschool, high school and transition aged (18-21) students and their families creating meaningful opportunities for an outstanding and fulfilling quality of life. I am a MOVE certified trainer for the MOVE curriculum, Best Buddies program coordinator, co-chair and Board Member of the Ulster Project Delaware, and... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Supported Decision-Making and Alternatives to Guardianship
Limited Capacity seats available

Decision-making is a skill like any other. We each process information differently and react based on different priorities and different life experiences. Similarly, we all experience difficulties in decision-making at one time or another. It's natural and human to make mistakes and find the supports we need to make better decisions. For individuals with disabilities, there are less opportunities to build decision-making skills and make the mistakes necessary for learning better decisions. This is because guardianship laws allow judges to take away all civil rights based on if that individual has a disability and if they make "good decisions". For many individuals, someone is appointed as their guardian before they have the opportunity to make any decisions at all. Supported Decision-Making is a way of breaking down the decision-making process, finding where someone has difficulty, and identifying the supports needed to help that person make the decisions that are right for them. The process recognizes that we are each individuals and we each deserve the right to take risks, make mistakes, and lead the life we want. This training seeks to give an overview of guardianship, the decision-making process, and how to use supports to accommodate someone who needs assistance with decisions-making without resorting to guardianship. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1) identify what a functional limitation in decision-making looks like; 2) identify what support tools are available to support someone with a functional limitation in decision-making; and 3) create a Supported Decision-Making plan which describes how a person will be able to use support when they have trouble making decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Lydia  Paquette

Lydia Paquette

Staff Attorney, Disability Rights Maine
Lydia Paquette grew up in the eastern most point of the United States and graduated from the University of Maine at Orono with a B.A. in Psychology. She went on to obtain her J.D. from Roger Williams University School of Law with a focus in public interest law. During both undergraduate and law school she volunteered and interned with Pine Tree Legal Assistance helping low income Maine citizens obtain access to justice. She is fully committed... Read More →


TASH pdf

Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Suspension Isn't Teaching!: A Case Study of One School's Approach to Reducing Violence while Raising the Bar for Students with Intense Behavioral and Mental Health Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Pioneer High School, in Portland, Oregon, serves students who are considered a danger to self or others and who, in the past, were placed in a highly restrictive placement that had them isolated from typical peers, high expectations and rigorous curriculum options. All students are on IEPs, many qualified under Emotional Disturbance, and the large majority of students have a high ACES score and have experienced extensive trauma in their lives. There is a disproportionate representation of students and families of color, as compared to district data. Attending school a solely peers with their same level of need and intensity, there were daily fights and police calls and hundreds of incidents reports, restraints, and suspension days. This year, Pioneer redesigned their approach and now has 75% of their students integrated with typical high school students on 3 comprehensive high school campuses. Students have access to regular high school classes, a diverse peer group, and all of the exciting pieces of high school like sports, clubs, and dances. The 25% of students who display a level of behavior that would put them or their peers at risk if placed in a comprehensive high school, have an increased level of community outings and community work experiences to expose them to typical expectations. Pioneer High School has created a strong vision that incorporates the models of Collaborative Problem Solving, Restorative Justice and Trauma Informed Practices into all instruction and interventions. It is the expectation that all staff help kids to meet basic needs first, build relationship through empathy and clear expectations, and then explicitly teach the social and academic skills that will help students transition away from our high level of support and into less restrictive environments. Through this approach, Pioneer has reduced violent incidents by over 75%, had just 3 suspension days, had no police calls, increased attendance and student participation, and implemented new practices like an In-School Support Day that helps students learn (instead of being excluded!) when their behavior shows us there is a skill deficit that needs to be addressed. This session will more explicitly talk about how the school went from a fully exclusionary model to a largely inclusion model in just one year and what pieces are essential for any other districts considering similar approaches.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

2:30pm

Teaching Emotional Regulation: Critical skills for Independent Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Schools are facing a growing population of students who are not making progress in the regular classroom due to their underlying emotional/behavioral challenges. We term these students "Cognitively Able but Behaviorally Unmanageable" and they present a challenge to even the most seasoned educator. Data from the American Academy of Adolescent Psychiatry suggests that 49.5% of children have mental health issues significant enough to require support. Schools are seeing the value of whole class social emotional programs and there is a large push to bring programs to the classroom. Yet, these programs that are targeting students with emotional/behavioral deficits, are not designed to support their very special needs. Just as we differentiate programs for academic needs, it is time to differentiate the social emotional programs for our students with emotional needs. Studies(fMRI) have identified that deficits in the limbic system of the brain are a cause of emotional dysregulation for disabilities such as Autism, ADHD, and EBD. Further, compelling new research shows the benefit of a cognitive behavioral approach to treatment. This session will review the research(2014-16) on Emotional Regulation and its link to Autism, EBD, ADHD, and NVLD. A review of current treatment options to manage behavior will be discussed relative to current research. Specifically, we will examine if the current traditional behavior programs used in schools are keeping up with current research, or if they are using research that has since been updated. This session will present new methods that are expressly developed for the targeted population and are based on the new research indicating emotional regulation as a core feature of the disabilities. Using more targeted approaches to teach students vastly improves their emotional regulation skills. Improved emotional regulation leads to an increase in time spent in classrooms and time on learning. By the end of the session participants will a)Have an in depth and comprehensive understanding of the new research on Emotional Regulation. b)Understand how Emotional Dysregulation impacts a student with ASD, ADHD, EBD etc. as negative behaviors often require removal from a regular classroom. Ÿ??Discuss and analyze the current programs and strategies in place to manage the behaviors that result from diminished ER abilities. Ÿ??Utilize a new and proven method to teach strategies to manage ER in classrooms using technology based on Cognitive Behavioral Theory.

Speakers
avatar for Lori Jackson

Lori Jackson

Co-Founder, The Connections Model
Lori Jackson is an educational psychologist who has extensive experience working with students and families with ASD and other global disabilities. She is the co-director of the Connections Program which serves public school students with spectrum disorders, emotional behavioral disorders, and other low-incidence disabilities. Jackson has presented nationally on new methods and approaches for working with students with ASDs and other global... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Teaching Self-Management Strategies to Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
Limited Capacity seats available

This session describes findings from three single case studies in which we taught children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder to use self-management strategies to improve compliance with home-related routines and/or improve fluency of math facts. The studies took place in each child???s home at times the families had identified as having high rates of problem behavior. The session fits with the theme of the TASH conference, Gateway to Equity, because helping children with disabilities learn strategies to manage their own behavior increases their autonomy and makes it more likely they will be successful in inclusive school, community, and employment settings. After this session, participants in this session will be able to: 1. describe some of the key behavioral challenges of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). 2. describe at least four basic self-management strategies they can teach to children with FASD or other individuals in need of behavioral support. 3. explain how to teach children with disabilities, such as FASD, to use simple self-management strategies to improve their social or academic behaviors.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Terror to Tolerance to Transformation: How Parents Create Opportunities that Support Self-Determination for Adults with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

A conversation and presentation with families, people with disabilities, and others about meaningful ways to support self-determination and fully inclusive living. Discussion will include effective and practical ways that parents can move from the role of protector to role of guide through creating circles of support, working through fears, and engaging in regular reflective conversations with key folks. Real-world examples and lessons learned drawn from our family's journey will be shared. The importance of valuing disability culture and pride will be emphasized. Learning Objectives: By the end of the session, participants will be able to: a) identify 3 strategies that support self-determination in daily living for young adults and adults with disabilities b) describe how parents/family members can move from the role of protector to the role of guide c) recognize two ways to manage parental worries d) identify ways to initiate or grow circles of support

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

The Importance of Belonging, Relationships, and Learning with Each Other
Limited Capacity seats available

The European individualistic perspective rather than collectivism has profoundly affected our educational structure and approaches from preschool through college. Participants will discuss embracing our interdependence in our efforts to create inclusive neighborhood schools. Participants will... Focus on our interdependence rather than independence. Rediscover the possibilities and the vision of inclusion. Generate ideas to use in our advocacy for inclusive schools and communities. Share with others.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara J. McKenzie

Barbara J. McKenzie

Chairperson, Ohio TASH
Barb McKenzie is an advocate, presenter, and organizer of gatherings about the importance of creating inclusive communities. The chair of Ohio TASH, she participates on International TASH’s Inclusive Education committee. Barb is the author of “Reflections of Erin – the Importance of Belonging, Relationships, and Learning with Each Other,” a collection of stories, observations, and images inspired by her daughter Erin’s life which... Read More →



Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

2:30pm

Transforming Teacher Education Programs to Support Inclusion Specialists: Evaluating Effectiveness
Limited Capacity seats available

This session focuses on transforming teacher education to reflect the skills, competencies and dispositions necessary for teachers to assume the role of inclusion specialist. We will describe our evaluation of learning experiences to develop teaching and advocacy skills that transform predominantly segregated services. We seek to identify the critical influences of teachers' growth toward inclusion. This session focuses on transforming teacher education to reflect the skills, competencies and dispositions necessary for teachers to assume the role of inclusion specialist. We will describe our evaluation of learning experiences to develop teaching and advocacy skills that transform predominantly segregated services. We seek to identify the critical influences of teachers' growth toward inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Building Cross-System Support for Person-Centered Counseling
Limited Capacity seats available

District of Columbia State Office of Disability Administration Department on Disability Services representative and a self-advocate will describe how we have used our Person-Centered Thinking journey to guide our system change conversations to cross-system long-term supports and services agencies. We will describe how we have used our Person Centered Learning Community with our People Planning Together, Families Planning Together, and Person Centered Thinking training to identify areas for systemic advocacy and build shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports for people with and their families, throughout a person's life.. 1. Understand the work of the Person-Centered Learning Community with a focus on No Wrong Door systems change efforts in the District of Columbia. No Wrong Door is one citywide system for people and caregivers to access and control long-term services and supports with informed choice. The DC Learning Community is a team of family members, people with IDD, and other government and community partners, that develop and implement action plans to shape policies and programs that support a sustainable person centered cross-agency system. 2. Learn about how the DC Person-Centered Learning Community uses person-centered thinking and system change tools as a vehicle for identifying challenges, envisioning success, and for understanding and building a shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports. 3. Describe families, self-advocates, and government partners visions for how we can better support a person-centered system. 4. Summarize how people with IDD, family members, non-profits, and government agencies in D.C. used what they had learned from attending person-centered thinking training to begin making changes at all levelsŸ?? in thinking, in practice, in policy, and in rules and legislation Ÿ?? to better support people with IDD and their families throughout the lifespan. 5. Share the conclusions and recommendations to sustain a person-centered system, created by members of the DC Person Centered Thinking Learning Community to support systems change efforts of the No Wrong Door initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Gateway to the Inclusive Culinary Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

"GATEWAY TO THE INCLUSIVE CULINARY CLASSROOM" explores inclusion through a STRUCTURED DISCUSSION based on real-world experiences in the development of an inclusive culinary classroom and curriculum. This unique curriculum is strengthening the disabilities field by the interactivity of program participants to unique perspectives on the life skill of food preparation - as a science and art form to be enjoyed; By facilitating connections between stakeholders (participants, guardians/parents, case managers and delivery personnel/instructors), the passion for an inclusive world is being reignited. The successes participants experience in this hands-on “culinary lab” becomes the foundation to building their confidence in pursuing further ongoing educational opportunities. Come prepared to challenge preexisting ideas of an "INCLUSIVE" CULINARY CLASSROOM. You will learn: Why and How to setup an INCLUSIVE CULINARY CLASSROOM In a non-cooking environment; How to build SELF-ESTEEM and confidence by educating and building culinary competence skills; Understanding ground-level key safety standards in a culinary environment; (memes and hooks) *Cooking and Culinary skills taught as a project management process; Increase the HANDS-ON experience base; *Walk-away with sample curricula, lesson plan and recipe templates, class worksheets, as well as fun entertaining hands-on class learning projects; *Learn the core program model, and the project management processes of finding success in the realm of flexibility.

Speakers
avatar for Emile Johnson

Emile Johnson

EmmausLink Community Coordinator, Emmaus Homes
I have been a Suzuki Music educator for 30+ years. This has strongly influenced my outlook towards education. Suzuki music education contends that Every Child Can. What happens when these children grow up? They grow into adults that can as well. The same educational model that works for music education works just as well for adults. I completed my education at the University of Missouri in Columbia Missouri. My social services... Read More →
avatar for David Lee Szalanski

David Lee Szalanski

Culinary Chef-Instructor, EmmausLink
Prior to becoming a chef and chef-instructor, DavidLee received his Bachelor of Science from Gannon University in Bio/Chemistry and attended Hahnemann University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. DavidLee’s career spanned 20 years in health and human services across the US, with notable organizations including Big Brothers Big Sisters; the American Lung Association; United Way's in Philadephia, Jacksonville FL, New Mexico, and Orlando... Read More →



Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Midway Suites IV 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

I Never Gave Guardianship Much Though': Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Presume Competence
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, we present a case study of a service learning project completed by a team of five pre-service teachers in an undergraduate inclusive teacher education course. The project, which partnered the team with the family of a student with complex support needs, culminated in a research-based presentation about alternatives to guardianship for the student and his family. Through pre- and post-surveys, questionnaires and end-project reflections, the pre-service teachers demonstrated increased awareness of disability rights issues; increased awareness of guardianship and the importance of alternatives; increased appreciation and skills for direct interaction with families and students with complex support needs; increased presumption of competence of individuals with disabilities; and increased awareness of the need to be strong advocates for human rights and inclusion in school, work, home and community. The session begins with an overview of the course and project requirements, continues with a summary of the research conducted by the team, and concludes with discussion of this case study as an example for effective preparation of inclusive educators. By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the importance of preparing teachers in inclusive education, rather than separate general and special education programs; 2. Summarize the impact of firsthand service learning opportunities in teacher education; and 3. Discuss this case study as an example of effective inclusive teacher preparation.

Speakers
avatar for Whitney Rapp

Whitney Rapp

Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College
Whitney Rapp is an Associate Professor of Inclusive Education. Her areas of expertise are universal design for learning; positive classroom management and behavioral support; and planning and instruction for highly diverse, inclusive classrooms. Dr. Rapp is the author of Universal Design for Learning in Action: 100 Ways to Teach All Learners and the co-author of Teaching Everyone: An Introduction to Inclusive Education.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Practice Makes Perfect: How do teachers use evidence-based practices to inform instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

This innovative survey asked the special education teachers in Tennessee questions regarding their training in and use of instructional practices. Respondents reported their frequency of use and access to training/materials for 27 practices. Respondents rated factors involved in their decision to use or not use an instructional practice (e.g., reliance on personal feelings versus all stakeholders priorities). Additionally, respondents indicated the level of importance and preparedness they felt instructing in various school subjects. The results of the survey are intended to guide training opportunities to improve teacher knowledge in promoting and executing high quality instruction for all students with disabilities in inclusive schools and communities.. Ÿ?? Participants will learn the types of practices reportedly in use by special education teachers. Ÿ?? Participants will explore the various factors that teachers use in making instructional decisions. Ÿ?? Participants will discuss the use of evidence-based practices and the importance of high quality instruction in promoting inclusive learning for students with disabilities.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Teachers' decisions regarding community-based instruction for secondary students with severe disabilities.
Limited Capacity seats available

The use of community-based instruction (CBI) for students with severe disabilities is a well-established method for teaching skills in the natural environment. Benefits to CBI also include opportunities for generalization and inclusion within their communities. However, with increasing pressure from administrators adhering to federal legislation mandates that focus on access to academic standards and participation in the general education classroom (IDEA, 2004; NCLB, 2002), in addition to the barriers associated with CBI (e.g., transportation, staffing; Dymond, 2012; Steere & DiPipi-Hoy, 2012), the result may be less time spent on instruction in community settings. This qualitative study investigated how special education teachers select skills to teach in the community and the factors that influence their decisions to use CBI with their students who have severe disabilities. Participants were 13 high-school special education teachers who use CBI at least once a week to teach their students with severe disabilities. The research questions were explored through semi-structured interviews. Preliminary findings suggest that teachers decide which skills to teach based upon perceived student need and parent input and that the factors that influence their decision to use CBI include (1) benefit of learning skills in the natural environment, (2) opportunity for different experiences, and (3) inclusion within the community. Session attendees will be able to:
  • Identify how teachers select the skills they teach in the community; 
  • Understand the factors that teachers report influence their decision to use CBI; and 
  • Identify recommended practices to use when planning to teach students with severe disabilities in the community.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Teaching Comprehension through Grade Aligned Adapted High School Novel via an iPad
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of the presentation is to summarize and describe the results from a single case design study that measures the effects of an iPad application containing a grade aligned adapted high school novel on the listening comprehension of high school students with significant disabilities. Results of the study indicated a functional relation between the use of the application and gains in vocabulary, comprehension, and engagement. This session will also highlight the use of technology to promote grade aligned standard instruction in the context of use within the inclusive classroom. . a) effectively use an iPad application featuring adapted grade level aligned fictional text to promote listening comprehension for students in the high school setting b) discuss ways to implement grade-aligned access to ELA skills for students with significant disabilities in inclusive settings

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Mims

Pamela Mims

Associate Professor, East Tennessee State University
Systematic Instructional, Access to the General Education Curriculum, Alignment, ABA


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Teaming for TIDES: Teaching Independence, Determination, and Empowerments Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation, Teaming for TIDES, aligns with the TASH 2016 theme, "Gateway to Equity". The TIDES program is a collaborative partnership between a community-based transition center and the local university. Pre-service special educators peer mentor local transition students in both academic and non-academic inclusive campus activities. The TIDES program has resulted in a variety of social and academic benefits (Jones & Goble, 2012) for the students, families and greater community. This presentation highlights the initial development, implementation and assessment of the first year of the TIDES program. After this session, participants will be able to: a) Discuss benefits of an inclusive campus experience for students with and without disabilities; b) Explain why pre-service special education teachers should have authentic transition program experience; c) Discuss the issues involved with developing a campus-based transition program.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Tiered Systems: Establishing Comprehensive, Integrated, Collaborative Systems to Meet Students??? Multiple Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

The focus of this session is to address academic, behavioral, and social domains in tandem through a Comprehensive, Integrated Three-Tiered (CI3T) Model of Prevention, the next generation of PBIS. As part of this integrated approach, screening and assessment systems are put in place to support early detection efforts across the pre-K through 12th grade continuum as well as accurate assessment of student performance over time. Participants will learn systems for proactively responding to identified students' needs to increase academic, behavioral, and social success in inclusive environments. Participants will also explore a specific training and coaching series and one district???s current approach to a pilot model of C3T. 1. Participants will know the critical features of the CI3T model as a model to support inclusive practices and be able to access resources to explore additional information to share with their schools, districts, communities. 2. Participants will know the training and coaching series which supports the development of CI3T models and be able to explore this option for their schools, districts, and communities.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Transforming Moderate to Severe Classrooms for the 21st Century
Limited Capacity seats available

There are a number of strategies and technology tools that can assist special education teachers in transforming their classrooms to meet the challenges of 21st learning. Free online webinars in the AbleNet University, give teachers new knowledge and skills that will improve effective use of technology and teaching strategies for all students. Assistive Technology resources can offer teachers useful skills to plan, prepare and provide opportunities for participation and engaging instruction. The Action Dictionary provides alternative methods for access to the content so teachers can increase participation and create higher expectations for all students. This workshop will provide participants with keys to unlocking a transformation in their own classrooms. Participants will a. State three solutions to transform the classroom for students with moderate to severe disabilities B. Use the action dictionary to find three alternative access strategies for an ELA and three math lesson. C. Will list three changes to their instruction, classroom or materials to move closer to transforming their classroom

Speakers
avatar for Tana Donaghy

Tana Donaghy

Tana Donaghy, President Educational Equity For All, has worked in the field of special education for over 18 years. Previously she was with the LA County Office of Education and now has her own company providing support to districts, county offices and SELPA’s. She has worked with Pre-K through 12. Her expertise is with students who have moderate to severe and profound disabilities. She trains teachers, administrators and parents on... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Transition to Independent Living Literature: Progress and Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation reviews the literature on transition to independent living to identify factors and effective practices that enhance postsecondary independent living outcomes for students with disabilities. Additionally, it identifies gaps in the literature and proposes a conceptual framework that can be used for future research. Participants will learn about: 1) the prevalence of independent living for people with disabilities 2) the current state of evidence-based practices in transition to independent living 3) practices they can incorporate to enhance transition to independent living outcomes

Speakers
avatar for Irina Cain

Irina Cain

Doctoral Candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Turning Anger into Art
Limited Capacity seats available

1g A big part of growing up is learning how to deal with anger. Equity is about fairness and justice. If being mad takes up all your time how can the other side resolve their issues? Two words Katie lives by; communication and creativity. Bad things happen. They just do. The trick is to take difficult feelings and turn them into a visual, audible, or written piece of creativity. Katie will lead a poetry workshop than can turn just about anyone into a poet. After this session the participants will be able to See first-hand how creativity can be used personally and professionally to succeed Understand that anger can be observed, managed and overcome Write a poem that doesnŸ??t have to rhyme unless you want it to Learn and understand the art of finding beauty in a perceived bad

Speakers
avatar for Katie Rodriguez Banister

Katie Rodriguez Banister

President, Access-4-All, llc
I am a speaker, author and disability educator. I have been a woman on wheels for twenty-six years and I share resources, books and my videos to inspire and empower. It took a wheelchair to find the man I love and married, so it's not all bad, right? I share my strategy for life that anyone can use.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Using Effective Team Practices to Collaborate with Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Purpose: This presentation contains a detailed description of how to build effective teams that use Interprofessional Collaborative Practices (IPCP) with special education professionals, general education teachers, speech and language pathologists and families of children with severe disabilities. Method: This presentation provides information on using the essential elements of team building and IPCP to provide quality care to families who have children with severe disabilities. The six essential elements for team building are described and suggestions for including families are indicated for each: a) setting goals, b) roles and responsibilities, c) effective and efficient process, d) communication and interpersonal interactions, e) collaborative problem solving and f) evaluation. The four competency domains of IPCP are embedded into each of the team building elements to demonstrate how teams can implement IPCP. Results: A case study illustrates the difficulty one parent experienced working with a team across the six essential team building elements when seeking inclusion for her child with severe disabilities. Conclusions: Building teams with IPCP can be effective to include families and create high quality outcomes for individuals with severe disabilities. As a result of this session participants will be able to : 1) Use the team building process 2) Facilitate collaborative relationships with families who have children with disabilities 3) Gain a perspective that parents have regarding participation on team work with professionals

Speakers
KC

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Using Peer Intervention to Improve Conversational Reciprocity of Ÿ??Dominant TalkersŸ? with Autism
Limited Capacity seats available

Difficulties with social communication is a defining characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Some students with ASD, who can be described as dominant talkers or verbal noncommunicators, are assertive (e.g. will initiate) but often are unresponsive to their partnerŸ??s communication bids displaying a number of interfering behaviors (e.g., inappropriately changing topics, interrupting to reintroduce a previous topic, making semantically vague statements, ignoring partnerŸ??s questions or comments). These difficulties in social communication can interfere with forming meaning relationships with peers and lead to social isolation. Peer-mediated intervention (PMI) is an evidence-based practice used to enhance social interactions for students with ASD by teaching peers how to support and facilitate conversation. This presentation illustrates how peers and students with ASD can be taught to engage in socially appropriate and reciprocal conversation in a high school cafeteria. We present findings of a research project and illustrate the peer-mediated strategies through video examples. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1. Articulate a rationale for using PMI to enhance the social communication skills of high school students. 2. Summarize effective peer-mediated strategies, based on our research, for improving the conversational skills of dominant talkers with ASD in an inclusive high school setting. 3. Identify how the peer-mediated strategies can be implemented within their home school setting.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Thomas

Amanda Thomas

Doctoral Student, Lehigh University
Amanda Thomas is a PhD student at Lehigh University. Her areas of interest are peer-mediated social communication interventions for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and evidence-based practices in secondary transition.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

3:30pm

Using Read-Alouds of Informational Text to Promote Conversation Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will provide a summary of a research project utilizing strategies read aloud of informational text on topics selected by high school students with autism spectrum disorders. The students then used information learned to engage in conversations with peers who were nondisabled using an ipad-based conversation booklet. 1. Learn strategies for embedding informational text in an Ipad format. 2. Develop instructional intervention for teaching student to comprehend the text and use it for conversational turn taking. 3. Discover ways to embed the strategies in general education high school classes.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Haughney

Kathryn Haughney

Snyder Graduate Assistant and Doctoral Student, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Mrs. Haughney, under the direction of Diane Browder and Belva Collins, conducts research around effective methods for supporting learners with complex communication needs as well as creating general curriculum access for students with a multiple, severe learning needs. Her other research interests include alternate achievement literacy and meeting the needs of culturally diverse learners.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Using School Visits to Prepare Doctors to Better Serve Children with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

In order to better prepare physicians to support individuals with disabilities and their families, a new curriculum was piloted at a School of Osteopathic Medicine. Third year medical students, during their pediatric rotation, were required to visit and observe classrooms that included children with significant special needs. The impact of the observations was measured through a survey of perceived competency in requisite pediatric knowledge and skills and an assessment designed to determine their knowledge of questioning strategies to communicate with children and their parents. The program, the findings, and the future direction of the research will be discussed. This project is aligned with the theme of the "gateway to equity" by ensuring the physicians have knowledge of educational supports and services available for children with disabilities and are able to effectively communicate with parents and children about the school experience. At the end of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Explain the importance of experiential learning for the physician in the school context. 2. Describe 3 ways that the classroom observations provide the physicians with examples of evidenced based practices for teaching children with disabilities. 3. Discuss the challenge of families and physicians having meaningful discussions about development during the 20 minute well visit.

Speakers
MS

Mary Sheppard

Rowan University


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Using smart watches to access an inclusive college campus with students with intellectual/developmental disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This single subject study examined a task analysis developed to teach individuals with intellectual/developmental disability (I/DD) to set a daily schedule using his or her smart watch and phone to access a college campus. The studentsŸ?? use the smart watch/phone combination in order to receive notifications (i.e., alarms) about important meetings (e.g., class, study time). A total of five students participated in the study, which took place in an inclusive setting on a college campus in the Southwest United States. After this presentation, practitioners will be able to implement this strategy using smart technology with individuals with I/DD. After this session, participants will be able to discuss the methodology, results, implications, and limitations of a strategy to teach students with I/DD how to set alarms on his or her smart phone based on his or her daily schedule. After this session, participants will be able to discuss the use of smart technology (i.e., smart phone and smart watch) to promote self-determination of students with I/DD in college as they learn to set his or her own daily schedule. After this session, participants will be able to implement the exact steps of the task analysis presented to teach students with I/DD how to set alarms based on his or her daily schedule.

Speakers

Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

College Student Chapters Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

A short presentation regarding TASH chapter development at colleges and universities. Hear some tips for recruiting members, organizing the chapter, and planning events

 

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Gibbons

Benjamin Gibbons

Intern, TASH
I am a senior psychology major at The George Washington University in DC. During my studies, I've become aware of the negative stigma associated with disability and I am glad to be a part of TASH's efforts to fight such stigma. I am developing a TASH chapter at my university and will be holding a meeting for other students interested in doing so at their own schools. My email is bgibbons@tash.org and my phone number is 484-798-4626.
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anything, just ask and I will do what I can. If you want to know about membership or chapters, come by the table (next to registration) and ask.


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Red Caps Union Station Hotel St. Louis

3:30pm

Inclusive Education Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Information Coming soon

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

3:30pm

Communication Initiative Discussion
Meet to brainstorm and share your ideas on this new important TASH initiative. 

For more information contact Jusy Bailey at judybailey@aol.com

Speakers
JB

Judy Bailey

Consultant on AAC/FC and Positive Behavior Supports
Judy C. Bailey, M.Ed., has been a supported typing facilitator for over twenty years working primarily in northern Virginia and the metro Washington D.C. area. She completed the Train the Trainer seminar and currently works with individuals, families and schools to provide support, training and mentoring in supported typing. Ms. Bailey is also an endorsed Positive Behavior Support (PBS) Facilitator in Virginia. She has provided services to... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Pegram Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Virginia TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

A chance to meet and greet fellow Virginia TASH members as well as non-members attending the conference interested in the work of Virginia TASH. We will share our plans for the coming year and our advocacy efforts around inclusion, communication and restraint and seclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities dating back to 1982. My early work at the Center on Human Policy and Jowonio School in Syracuse formed the foundation for the work I now do as a teacher educator at... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

North Carolina TASH Chapter Meeting
Moderators
KC

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University

Thursday December 1, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

College Student Chapters Social
Limited Capacity seats available

This event is by invitation only.

If you are interested in attending please contact Benjamin Gibbons at bgibbons@tash.org 

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Gibbons

Benjamin Gibbons

Intern, TASH
I am a senior psychology major at The George Washington University in DC. During my studies, I've become aware of the negative stigma associated with disability and I am glad to be a part of TASH's efforts to fight such stigma. I am developing a TASH chapter at my university and will be holding a meeting for other students interested in doing so at their own schools. My email is bgibbons@tash.org and my phone number is 484-798-4626.
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anything, just ask and I will do what I can. If you want to know about membership or chapters, come by the table (next to registration) and ask.


Thursday December 1, 2016 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Presidential Suite 315 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

4:30pm

Early Career Researcher Network Meeting and Social Hour
Information Coming soon


Thursday December 1, 2016 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Grand A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

5:00pm

New England TASH Chapter Meeting
Come meet some of the New England TASH Board members. Whether you are a new or long-time member of TASH, please come say hi. 

Moderators
Thursday December 1, 2016 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Red Caps Union Station Hotel St. Louis

6:00pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →

Thursday December 1, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103
 
Friday, December 2
 

7:00am

Association Breakfast and State of TASH
Meeting for Current TASH Members Only. Join us and learn more about current and future plans for TASH as you enjoy a complimentary breakfast. The TASH Board of Directors and staff will be present to answer questions. 

Please consider becoming a member a be part of it.
Become a member now 

Speakers
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autonomy in their daily lives. She was the the founder and principal partner of Blue Fire Consulting and provided consulting services across the United States in areas of... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 7:00am - 8:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

7:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH Conference attendees. The room is located near the atrium (glass floor) area of the hotel.

Friday December 2, 2016 7:00am - 6:30pm
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Conference Exhibit Hall will be open so you can check out organizations and businesses that support inclusive practices across the country. 

List of Exhibitors coming soon!

Friday December 2, 2016 8:00am - 12:00pm
Exhibit Hall 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Achieving Inclusive Postsecondary Education Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

During this presentation university faculty, staff, students, and other key stakeholders (e.g., families, community members) will discuss how they collaborate to ensure the rigor and success of SUCCEED, a post-secondary program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Presenters will provide tips, strategies, and lessons learned for individuals interested in attending, developing , or enhancing an inclusive post-secondary university program. OBJECTIVES: -identify the importance of inclusive post-secondary education. -identify the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure the success of post-secondary education. -identify key components that lead to successful collaboration between faculty, staff, students, and key stakeholders. -have tools they can immediately use to cultivate collaborative partnerships with multiple stakeholders to advance inclusive, meaningful post-secondary education for all students.

Speakers
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Regency A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Being a 21st Century GREAT Inclusive Teacher:Trends,Tools,Tips,Tech.
Limited Capacity seats available

This year's theme"Gateway to Equity"are two words that are essential for a 21st century special educator's practice. As a gatekeeper they are required to facilitate transition to new learning and competency for their students.They must create programs through innovation that engages in an environment that reflects equity.This involves knowledge of tools,tips,and technology as keys to open the gate. demonstrate a working program that empowers participants examine the characteristics of a 21st century GREAT special education teacher facilitate engagement & innovation

Speakers
avatar for Ashleigh Molloy

Ashleigh Molloy

Director, TransEd Institute
Dr. Ashleigh Molloy is an energized and motivated leader. He is the President and Founder of the TransEd Institute, a global leader in trans-formative professional development. He consults, presents and delivers training at international conferences on varied topics. He is a respected Keynote speaker, adjunct professor, author and an internationally renowned workshop presenter who has appeared on both radio and television. He has devoted... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Benefits of Regular Education Math Teaching Methods for Students with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Longitudinal data was collected over a five year period from a public high school on a reservation in a north central state. The participating classroom was one for Native American students with significant intellectual disabilities. Data included attitude surveys, base-10 assessments, Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) problem types ??? problem solving and reasoning assessments, grade-level math assessments, standardized assessments, student work samples, video recordings of students solving mathematical problems, and interview transcripts from conversations with the classroom teacher. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of this approach to teaching students with significant intellectual disabilities. The analysis required a range of analytical tools, some quantitative/some qualitative and addressed changes in student attitudes over time, student achievement on a range of measures and student outcomes, a determination regarding whether or not these students followed the typical taxonomy or a unique one for this population, and what methods of assessment best capture the abilities of these students. It has the potential to lay a foundation for a very different approach to teaching this population of learners than what has been used for the last 30-40 years in the special education field. Additionally, this study clearly points to the need to raise expectations and increase exposure to higher level mathematics concepts for our students with intellectual disabilities. By the end of the session, the participants will be able to: - explain the importance of matching math problems with student experiences - describe changes in attitudes of students who have been exposed to regular education teaching methods that match their culture and lived experiences - discuss the differences in taxonomies, or learning progressions, of Native American students with intellectual disabilities compared to other groups that have been studied previously - explain the implications of this study in relation to inclusive practice and the need for access to general education curriculum and instructional practices

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Campus Connect: Dual Enrollment Post-Secondary program for students with Intellectual Disabilities (Madison College, Wisconsin)
Limited Capacity seats available

In Wisconsin there are options for students with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism who wish to transition from high school to college. In the past, the majority of transitional planning for students with ID 18-21 focused on supported employment. The Madison School District Campus Connect Program at Madison Area Technical College provides fully inclusive post-secondary education for students with disabilities seeking non-degree certificates and degree certificates. Learn how students with ID and Autism take advantage of additional universal design instructional methods, self-determination, and peer-mentor networks in the college environment to be successful. 1. Attendees will lean about the strategies and structure to develop and maintain a post-secondary education dual enrollment program with a local school district and technical college. 2. Attendees know and understand data from previous three years of Campus Connect at Madison College including grades, instructional and support strategies, and choosing successful career programs that lead to long term vocational placement. 3. Attendees will learn about best practices for post-secondary education for students with intellectual disabilities and Autism using Think College national standards.

Speakers
avatar for Eric  Hartz

Eric Hartz

Post Secondary Coordinator, Madison Metro School district
Dr. Hartz is the Coordinator and lead teacher for the Campus Connect Program for the Madison Metro School District. Campus Connect is a dual enrollment program at Madison College for students with disabilities who require beyond reasonable accommodations in college. He has been specializing in special education transition topics for the last 15 years and developed the Campus Connect Program based on his dissertation research of the Cutting... Read More →



Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Capacity-building through Collaboratively Planned Units of Instruction: Examples from Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, 3 interns-now first year special education teachers, 1 school-based inclusion specialist, and 1 professor working within a collaborative teacher preparation partnership will share examples of co-planned science, math and history units with highly successful academic inclusion and unit modifications for students with significant disabilities. Planning process uses many of our best EBP including Student-centered planning, UDL, Systematic Instruction, AT, and Peer Supports. Key here was the use of these processes and practices by interns to build team capacity for academic inclusion and to enhance the perceived capacity of the students with significant disabilities. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Use UDL as a common language and practice for collaborative planning and co-teaching 2. Use a unit modification strategy for co-planning 3. Use systematic instruction, UDL, AT and peer supports to plan meaningful learning and participation for students with significant disabilities within units of content area instruction. 4. Use academic learning as a tool for capacity building for the student and all team members. 5. Bring back successful examples of capacity-building co-planned units from inclusive classrooms to their own teams. 6. Visualize what an inclusive teacher can do!

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities dating back to 1982. My early work at the Center on Human Policy and Jowonio School in Syracuse formed the foundation for the work I now do as a teacher educator at... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Communication in the Classroom Ÿ?? Things SLPs Know That Teachers and Parents Reinforce
Limited Capacity seats available

Communication is a most basic civil right and the gateway to everything Ÿ?? developing relationships, education, safety, health... However, data indicates that 30% of students with a significant disability still leave school without a symbolic form of communication. This session will highlight promising practices on developing communicative competence for students with complex communication needs. These practices include aided language modeling, core vocabulary, and teaching communication to all students as part of a daily instructional routine. As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Identify promising practices that can be implemented to increase communicative competence and pinpoint strategies that can be used immediately Participants will be introduced to a variety of best practice communication strategies used to engage individuals in communication, through video clip examples and hands on practice. 2. Identify communication skills that can be overtly taught as part of daily routines. People learn communication through modeling and practice. Participants will gain ideas on how to overtly teach, model and provide opportunities to practice such things as asking for assistance, expressing a refusal (no thank you), asking and answering questions, commenting and sharing ideas. 3. Identify strategies that can be implemented to teach others how to become more effective communication partners. Participants will be introduced to a variety of strategies (i.e., topic boards, aided language stimulation, and peer modeling) to engage individuals in communicative exchanges.

Speakers
avatar for Lou-Ann Land

Lou-Ann Land

University of Kentucky


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Computer-Assisted Sight Word Instruction: Providing Access to Reading Skill Development
Limited Capacity seats available

The ability to read fosters active, independent participation in school, community, and home environments. Although reading is an instructional priority for all students, research identifying effective reading instruction methods for students with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities (ID) is limited (Browder, Gibbs, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Courtade, Mraz, & Flowers, 2008). This research study employed a single subject, multiple baseline design to evaluate the effects of computer-assisted sight word instruction with incidental reading stimuli on the reading skill development of five elementary students with moderate to severe ID and expressive language impairments. Study results indicated weak to moderate treatment effects on sight word identification; variable gains were noted in incidental letter-sound correspondence and sight word comprehension. Computer-assisted sight word instruction accommodates the learning needs of students with moderate to severe ID and can be utilized to teach core content and life skills vocabulary in general education and home settings. At the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) describe the effects of a computer-assisted sight word intervention with incidental reading stimuli on the reading skill development of five students with moderate to severe ID and expressive language impairments. b) summarize how computer-assisted reading instruction accommodates the learning needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals for whom English is a second language. c) identify how computer-assisted sight word instruction can be utilized to provide access to and progress in the general education curriculum.

Speakers
CW

Colleen Wood-Fields

Assistant Professor, West Virginia University


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Cooperative Learning Interventions for Students Who Use AAC During Shared Reading Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

Interactive reading experiences can provide a natural context for the enhancement of language and literacy competencies, but also the additional growth of social skills and confidence. This session will inform the development of a three-step cooperative learning intervention within shared reading activities for the purposeful inclusion of students with intellectual disabilities or Autism who use aided augmentative and alternative communication devices in upper elementary and middle grades. As a result of this session participants will be able to a) identify a three-step cooperative learning intervention to increase social, communication, and academic outcomes for students with intellectual disabilities or autism who use aided augmentative and alternative communication systems b) examine additional opportunities for implementation of cooperative learning during shared reading activities (e.g., during introduction of new material, across a variety of content areas, during social-emotional activities) c) consider strategies for individualization based on learnersŸ?? symbolic level of communication, grade-aligned content areas, and preferences


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites II 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Core Vocabulary in Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants will learn the key components of communicative competence and core vocabulary. They will be provided with examples of students with disabilities whose individualized communication needs are being supported in inclusive settings to facilitate peer interactions and engagement in general education instruction. Allowing all students to be full members within their neighborhood classrooms and communities. After this session, participants will be able to a. define core vocabulary, b. design communication programs that support engagement for all students within inclusive settings, and c. discuss with colleagues the presumption of competence when considering the communication of students.

Speakers
JA

Jennifer Ayers

Special Education Building Coordinator for Instruction and Assessment, Cecil County Public Schools
In my current role, I support the district assessment and instruction of students with complex learning needs. During the 2014-15 school year, I participated in the Maryland State Department initiative to develop adapted lesson plans aligned with the Core Content Connectors, which were utilized by educators across the state. In addition, I have led the Cecil County Alternate Curriculum Committee, overseeing the development of aligned curriculum... Read More →
avatar for Mark Turek

Mark Turek

AT/AAC Specialist, Cecil County Public Schools


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Families and Decision-Making Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

Families of adults with disabilities are not always clear about their role in decision making for their children with disabilities as they become adults. Designing a support system that enables the adult with a disability to retain and exercise autonomy and choice is essential to experiencing an balanced and meaningful life as a full community member. Families can benefit from access to a wide range of information and support designed to help them make informed choices about what is best for each member of the family. This may include information about how to build a supportive relationship with an adult child or sibling and the legal and other options available to assist them with planning and life decision- making. The variety of factors that must be considered when helping family members be constructively involved in making life decisions for their adult children with disabilities will be explored in this session including understanding local laws, the dynamics of an adult family relationships and how to develop a plan for supporting decision-making over time. Participants will: - Name the elements of healthy relationships with adult children. - Identify the decision-making support needs of young adults with disabilities - Define the options for decision-making support. - Describe the components of a functional decision making support plan.


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Family experiences with educational decision-making for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Limited Capacity seats available

Families should be key participants in all educational decision-making for their children in order to ensure an appropriate and equitable education. Yet, some research has shown that parents face significant barriers to their active involvement. The present study recruited parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities for interviews and focus groups. Parents described their experiences participating in educational decision-making for their children and their satisfaction with their children???s services and placement. Results indicated that schools regularly excluded parents from educational decision-making and inconsistently provided appropriate, inclusive placements and services. In response, parents engaged in actions to attain appropriate services for their children in other ways, including moving, homeschooling, paying for private services, and engaging in legal action. Parents generally did not feel that their ideas were considered or implemented, and their identities revolved around being advocates, educators, and resilient negotiators. This presentation aligns with the conference theme by highlighting parent???s experiences with educational decision-making and recommending strategies to improve the relationship between parents and school teams, thereby creating more inclusive school communities. Presenters will discuss implications for educator pre- and in-service preparation and school structures to better support parent involvement. After attending this session, participants will be able to 1) identify the major ways in which parents are excluded from educational decision-making, 2) explain it???s impact on students??? educational placement and services, and 3) identify the educator qualities and skills needed to better collaborate with parents during educational decision-making.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
I am a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with significant disabilities in the general education classroom, teacher preparation to implement these supports, and collaboration with... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

No regrets .. a conversation about risk taking, supported decision making and vulnerability
Limited Capacity seats available

Building on our conversation at TASH 2015, we will introduce a plain language resource "Understanding Vulnerability - a guide for self advocates"  that has been developed in British Columbia This session will encourage dialogue to expand our understanding of people's rights to take risk, make plans to best support vulnerability and through story sharing- create strategies to support people to make informed decisions in their lives.

By the end of this session participants will be able to: identify strategies for supported decision making through shared stories understand how to support a person in their right to make choices in a supportive way have access to  a plain language guide for self advocates as a unique tool to help build awareness not only amongst self advocates but also their family members,  staff, service providers and others about the importance of being aware of vulnerabilities so intentional safeguards can be planned to address them.

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Jeffersonian/Knickerbocker 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

Partnering with Family Groups to Support, Reach, and Teach
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will describe the partnership that has developed between the Education Department of a small liberal arts college and a local advocacy group for families of children with Down Syndrome. Through this partnership, Education faculty and pre-service teachers provide sustained and meaningful support to parents, their children with special needs, and siblings through campus events offered throughout the year. These events reinforce the importance of inclusion, acceptance, and community participation. For those who registered for the TASH conference, "Valuing Lives" can be purchased online (digital download) for half price, $12.49, by visiting rtcmedia.vhx.tv and entering the coupon code TASH2016VL. The coupon will be valid until Dec. 16, 2016.
Short description of film:
Through archival images and footage, and dozens of interviews, the film “Valuing Lives” explores the principle of normalization, an idea that challenged our fundamental assumptions about people with intellectual disabilities, and the iconoclastic professor whose intense, multi-day workshops trained thousands of human services professionals in the theory and practice of this idea. Visit z.umn.edu/valuinglives to purchase the film and to view hours of expanded content. After this session, participants will be able to: 1. identify the appropriate individuals at an institution of Higher Education to contact when seeking to create a partnership. 2. consider their own priorities when seeking to develop a partnership. 3. describe the partnership that has been outlined between one Higher Education institution and local family advocacy organization.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Kode Sutton

Kimberly Kode Sutton

Special Education Program Coordinator, York College of Pennsylvania


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

8:20am

Supported Decision Making as an Alternative to Guardianships: What We Have Learned So Far.
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities are routinely subjected to guardianship, which deprives them of their right to make decisions about their own lives. For young people with disabilities who are transitioning out of high school, they are labeled as incompetent or incapacitated and placed under guardianship, often for their lifetime, and the specific time in their lives when they most need support in practicing their decision making skills. Yet for young and older adults, guardianships are imposed without any opportunity for the person to contest this label of incompetency or the guardianship itself. Supported decision making is being advanced as an alternative to guardianship that provides people with disabilities the support they may need while retaining their right to legal capacity and decision-making authority over their own lives. One presenter was involved in introducing SDM as an alternative to guardianship as part of the drafting of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities and has worked with different countries in developing SDM pilots and legislation. The presenters all have been involved in research involving people with and without guardians as well as pilot projects which restored people from guardianship and prevented other people from having guardians in the first place. This presentation will discuss these pilot project as well as a research project in Syracuse, NY, which involved five people with intellectual disabilities who live their lives without guardians, but who choose to have their "circles of friends" provide help in decision making, when they need it. This presentation also will discuss a recent project in Israel where the Parliament enacted one of the worldŸ??s most comprehensive supported decision making laws based on a project which restored legal capacity of 25 people who had been under guardianship. Finally, this presentation will provide suggestions for self-advocates and advocates who want to promote SDM in their states and localities. (1) Participants will understand and be able to critique existing guardianship laws as interfering with the right of people with disabilities to make decisions about their own lives. (2) Participants will learn how to respond to those who advocate for guardianship with specific examples of why guardianship should be replaced by a system that does not label people as incompetent and lacking in capacity with supported decision-making models. (3) After the session, participants will be able to develop strategies in their local jurisdiction to challenge the continued use of guardianship laws, particularly by educators as part of the transition planning for students with disabilities leaving high school. (4) After the session, participants will know where to find resources to support them in developing supported decision making alternatives to guardianship in their states or cities.

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

8:20am

What's The Problem?: Problematizing Classroom Environments to Create Truly Inclusive Classroom Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session explores the idea of 'problematizing,' a design concept that describes the process of examining commonly accepted attitudes, beliefs, processes and structures for the purpose of critically evaluating their impact on human lives. In learning environment problematizing is a means to identify the barriers to learning that are so deeply embedded in our environment and belief systems that we have grown accustomed to them and take them for granted. These hidden problems create barriers for some people in certain contexts. Once they are uncovered the problem solving process can begin. Applied to inclusive education, this is the process that needs to occur in classrooms in order for them to be universally designed to meet all studentsŸ?? needs and to be truly inclusive. This session begins with a theoretical foundation of problematizing and habituation. Then, examples of solved problems for physical space of the classroom, materials, instruction, behavioral expectations, and social contexts will be shared. Last, time will be devoted to sharing new problems and creating solutions collaboratively. After this session, participants will be able to: 1. Define the concepts of habituation and problematizing; 2. Explain the application of these terms to the inclusive classroom environment; 3. Identify problems or barriers that arise for people with disabilities; and 4. Produce solutions to the barriers to create universally designed environments.

Speakers
avatar for Whitney Rapp

Whitney Rapp

Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College
Whitney Rapp is an Associate Professor of Inclusive Education. Her areas of expertise are universal design for learning; positive classroom management and behavioral support; and planning and instruction for highly diverse, inclusive classrooms. Dr. Rapp is the author of Universal Design for Learning in Action: 100 Ways to Teach All Learners and the co-author of Teaching Everyone: An Introduction to Inclusive Education.


Friday December 2, 2016 8:20am - 9:10am
Midway Suites IV 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:00am

UMN Focus Group on HCBS 3 (Parents/Family Members)
Limited Capacity filling up

To participate, you MUST complete your Interest Form HERE 

The University of Minnesota (UMN) has a new RRTC on HCBS Outcome Measurement currently conducting stakeholder input. UMN's new Center is focused on improving the measures used to monitor services and supports funded through HCBS. The Center is truly focused on getting better person centered measures that are meaningful to people and that are psychometrically sound.

The Center has found success in getting participants from multiple states to participate  in stakeholder focus groups at conferences such as TASH. These focus groups are limited to 6 people for session. If you are interested in participating, please complete the interest form.

People interested in participating MUST meet one of following criteria:

  • Young adults with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Parent/Family Member of a young adult with I/DD (college/transition age); or
  • Young adult with I/DD with dual diagnosis (mental health/I/DD) 
Complete your Interest Form HERE 

Ypu can also copy and paste the link below:
http://member.tash.org/?page=UMNFocusGR16Conf

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:00am - 11:30am
Presidential Suite 315 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Community Living Committee Meeting
Speakers
JL

Jenny Lengyel

Executive Director, Total Living Concept
I am a fun, passionate and friendly person. I believe in and fight for Social Justice and the rights of all human beings. I love to read and listen to country music.


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 9:50am
Pegram Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

EmmausLink - Gateway to Community Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

We will present a program model that supports adults with Developmental Disabilities to enjoy leisure, recreation and educational opportunities in an inclusive, community environment. This is a consumer driven model that meets individuals where they are at, and encourages them to pursue opportunities naturally occurring within their communities. This model provides a degree of equity that would be the standard for anyone within that community. By the end of this session participants will be able to... 1) implement a program model that supports young adults ages 16 and above to transition successfully into various opportunities within their communities. 2)Facilitate individuals desires to pursue what they enjoy doing. 3)Have marketing strategies to communicate information to individuals and those who support them.

Speakers
avatar for Emile Johnson

Emile Johnson

EmmausLink Community Coordinator, Emmaus Homes
I have been a Suzuki Music educator for 30+ years. This has strongly influenced my outlook towards education. Suzuki music education contends that Every Child Can. What happens when these children grow up? They grow into adults that can as well. The same educational model that works for music education works just as well for adults. I completed my education at the University of Missouri in Columbia Missouri. My social services... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Equity Achieved Through Learning Standards-Aligned Content: Knowledge for ALL
Limited Capacity seats available

Knowledge is power! Connecting students eligible for alternate assessment to standards-aligned content learned by ALL students has been the focus of our work for 5 years. We will explore student access to writing, literature and informational text, math (ranging from numbers and operations all the way to algebra), and science. Access is just the beginning of the process. The majority of our work has focused on instructional practices, protocols, assessment, and finding the meaning and applicability of this content for individual learners. When combined appropriately, life-long learning and retention of knowledge occur. Evidence will be presented showing outcomes of students on content over time. 1. Describe the process used to make content accessible and meaningful for students eligible for alternate assessment, yet aligned to standards 2. Evaluate examples of content reduced in complexity in writing, reading, math, and science. 3. Summarize the link between effective instructional practices and protocols and mastery/retention of standards-aligned content using student-level data 4. Describe the meaningful life-long outcomes for students with significant disabilities as a result of learning standards-aligned content

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

9:20am

Eradicating Bullying
Limited Capacity seats available

Steve's "Eradicating Bullying" presentation talks about the different types of bullying and why people bully others. He also focuses on the three components of bullying and strategies for eradicating bullying. Steve is passionate about making a difference in this area. The learning objectives would be why people bully and the importance of how to stop and prevent bullying.

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

ESSA, IDEA, WIOA: Bringing Coherence to Career Development Strategies & Practices for Youth
Limited Capacity seats available

The federal policy framework has seen big changes recently. The Every Student Succeeds Act and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act have expanded the importance of early career development opportunities for youth beyond the typical IDEA transition planning. Research shows that all youth need opportunities to identify their interests and values, explore career and postsecondary options, set goals and make decisions about their future, and develop skills for planning and managing their own career development. This session takes participants from research to practice by sharing innovative strategies and practices from real programs for engaging youth in career development. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth has identified numerous research-based and promising practices over the past 12 years as a part of its online Innovative Strategies database, its research-based guides and publications, and its technical assistance work with various youth programs nationwide. Participants will understand the basic policy framework for career development established by ESSA, IDEA, and WIOA. Participants will leave with a list of resources, directory of innovative programs, and new ideas to support career development strategies and practices that support all youth. Participants will also get a chance to share their own strategies and success stories and gather othersŸ?? expertise during facilitated discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Stonemeier

Jenny Stonemeier

Senior Program Associate, Institute for Educational Leadership
These are a few additional resources that will supplement the Career Development session. | | http://www.ncwd-youth.info/sites/default/files/infobrief-40-families-and-college-and-career-readiness-ilp.pdf | | https://www.doleta.gov/wioa/Docs/WIOA_YouthProgram_FactSheet.pdf | | http://www.ncwd-youth.info/sites/default/files/FactSheet-ILP.pdf... Read More →



Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Midway Suites I 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Essential Supports: The Social Determinants of Health: Food, Shelter, Employment, Relationships
Limited Capacity seats available

Sounds like common sense Ÿ?? if people have access to healthy food, an accessible, affordable home, rewarding work and close relationships, they will have a better quality of life, and be better able to manage their health care. But the service system has parsed people and their services up by what gets paid for, who can provide it, and how available it is. Managed care is recognizing that these Ÿ??social determinants of healthŸ? have an important impact on the health outcomes of their members and on the resources states want them to manage. Presenters will share some research on the relationship between these common sense supports and health outcomes, and describe how Anthem / Amerigroup is incorporating an awareness of the importance of social supports in the company and building these supports into their managed care programs. Ÿ?? Participants will become familiar with current research in the importance of social determinants of health Ÿ?? Participants will identify barriers to obtaining these supports in their various states and what can be done to address the barriers Ÿ?? Participants will provide feedback to presenters on how to improve access to social supports in managed care programs

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Expanding Integrated Employment Opportunities through Reasonable Accommodations
Limited Capacity seats available

The availability of and entitlement to reasonable accommodations in the workplace opens up a world of integrated employment opportunities for people with disabilities. The accommodation process, as prescribed by the Americans with Disabilities Act and its various state counterparts, focuses on meeting the individualized needs of workers with disabilities through employer-employee communication and creative collaboration. However, because the process of requesting and receiving accommodations is tailored to each individual and reliant on employer-employee communication, many applicants and employees with disabilities are uncertain or anxious about engaging their employer in this process. This session will provide information for advocates and self-advocates regarding how reasonable accommodations can create and enhance employment opportunities for people with disabilities, as well as best practices for requesting and obtaining accommodations. After attending this session, attendees will be able to: * self-advocate (or advocate on behalf of a worker or applicant with disabilities) by understanding federal disability laws, including the ADA, that provide reasonable accommodation entitlements, and by knowing what to do if their rights under those laws are violated * understand the variety of accommodations available to workers with disabilities, and use resources like the Job Accommodation Network to help determine what type of accommodations might be appropriate for an individual's specific situation and needs *understand best practices regarding whether, when, and how to initiate a request for reasonable accommodations in the workplace and how to ensure the success of the reasonable accommodation process

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Langston

Rachael Langston

Senior Staff Attorney, Legal Aid Society - Employment Law Center


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Conductor Room 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Extracurricular School Clubs and Students with Severe Disabilities: Perceptions, Participation, & Purpose
Limited Capacity seats available

"AS PER EDWIN 2015 CONF PRESENTATION" This presentation will review findings from a study that investigated what purpose was served for secondary students with severe disabilities that participated in extracurricular school clubs and the factors that facilitated and hindered the realization of this purpose. By the end of the session, participants will be able to: (a) Summarize the need/purpose for including students with severe disabilities in extracurricular activities and school clubs; (b) Discuss factors that facilitate and hinder the participation of students with SD in extracurricular school clubs; and (c) Identify 3 strategies for increasing and supporting students??? engagement in extracurricular school clubs.

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Regency B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Fair Housing Rights and Enforcement
Limited Capacity seats available

The Fair Housing Act (FHA) prohibits discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. People with disabilities are also given additional protections under fair housing law. This workshop will give an overview of the fair housing rights and talk about ways you can work with fair housing organizations in your communities. 1. After this session, participants will be able to identify groups that are protected under the federal Fair Housing Act; 2. After this session, participants will be able to define discrimination and identify what types of housing is covered by the Fair Housing Act. 3. After this session, participants will be able to identify actions by landlords and leasing agents that are against the law; 4. After this session, participants will be able to make a request for a reasonable accommodation in housing for people with disabilities; 5. After this session, participants will be able to make a request for a reasonable modification in housing for people with disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Vard McGuire

Vard McGuire

Fair Housing Coordinator, Disability Law Center


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Regency A 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Frank's Journey: Being Influential in How Educators Support the Whole Student
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn one man's journey in being influential in impacting how teachers, his family, community supports and educational systems support the whole person. Following a traumatic brain injury in 2009, Mr. Frank Tyler will share his experiences in becoming a self-advocate and developing the skills to articulate his dreams. Additionally, Mr. Tyler will share the environmental supports and strategies that were learned and that continue to support him post-graduation and in the workplace. At the end of this session, participants will be able to: react to a personal story of one manŸ??s journey from school to employment following a traumatic brain injury Construct a rationale for supporting individuals in creating a road map to their dreams engaging family, friends, the school system and community agencies distinguish between strategies that support and actions that get in the way of supporting individuals in setting and reaching personal goals

Speakers

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Midway Suites III 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

From Workshop to Work: Video Case Studies of the Journey through Discovery
Limited Capacity seats available

As providers look to fully comply with the HCBS rule, many innovative models are being piloted to assess effectiveness in supporting individuals engaged in sheltered workshops to transition to competitive employment in the community. One particular pilot program adapted the Project SEARCH high school transition model for the purposes of supporting workshop-to-work transition. As part of the overall evaluation of the adapted model, this project aimed to document the individual journey of discovery through the use of video. In particular, the ability to articulate vocational strengths and self-determined career goals, a foundational goal of the pilot, was assessed over time. 1. Participants will view video case studies of project participants 2. Participants will share perceptions of the growth of the participants as documented over time 3. Participants will engage in dialogue about the benefits and limitations of the model 4. Participants will gain a general understanding of the structure of the Project SEARCH workshop-to-work model

Speakers
avatar for Julie Christensen

Julie Christensen

Associate Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (IA UCEDD)
Julie J. Christensen, LMSW, PhD, is the Associate Director of the Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen's background... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand B 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Guardianship Reform Updates by State
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is designed to provide an update to last year's session describing alternatives to guardianship. Many states have written new laws and policies to increase options for supported decision making while other states made guardianship easier to obtain. The session will highlight new state laws and policies, as well as discuss the implications for these directions. Participants will learn... -updates to state guardianship laws -current barriers to alternative options

Speakers
avatar for Shamby Polychronis

Shamby Polychronis

Associate Professor, Westminster College
Shamby Polychronis is an Associate Professor at Westminster College. Dr. Polychronis has served on multiple grant projects, co-authored several articles and textbooks, and presented at state and national conferences. Her scholarly interests include post-school outcomes for students, family support services, and teacher education. She serves as chair for the Human Rights Committee of TASH, a national organization to promote the equity, diversity... Read More →


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Frisco/Burlington 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

HCBS Final Rule Implementation Strategies - Control of Personal Resources
Limited Capacity seats available

The HCBS Final Rule was enacted to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS long-term care services and supports have full access to the benefits of community living and the opportunity to receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate. Relevant to this session, home and community-based settings must: Ÿ?? provide opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources, and Ÿ?? optimize individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices, This session will identify tools and strategies service you can use to support individuals to 1) improve money skills Ÿ?? recognizing, earning, managing and saving; and 2) set personal money goals; and support organizations to 1) identify just-in-time moments to teach an individual about their money, and 2) explore opportunities to integrate financial empowerment into service planning and disability services. Join the NDI LEAD Center for a fun interactive session packed with free tools and strategies to support individuals in better understanding their money, earning more, saving more, and exerting greater control over their personal resources. 1. As a result of the session, participants will be able to better understand the HCBS Final Rule on "Control of Personal Resources." 2. As a result of the session, participants will be able to better understand the current status of individuals with disabilities within the economic mainstream. 3. As a result of the session, participants will be able to introduce financial education and empowerment into individual service planning. 4. As a result of the session, participants will be able to identify key moments in service delivery to provide financial education and financial capability strategies. 5. As a result of the session, participants will be able to connect to financial education tools and curricula.


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Meaningful Parent Participation: Professional Considerations for Teaming with Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Families
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will provide a review of the research on parent participation in IEP meetings and other collaborative planning processes. Practical recommendations for increasing meaningful parent participation derived from the literature and from the presenters' research will be shared with an emphasis on serving families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. . Participants will be able to summarize the findings from the research literature on parent participation in IEPs and other collaborative planning processes. They will understand the unique barriers culturally and linguistically diverse families can face in these planning processes. Participants will be provided with opportunities to reflect on their own practice and learn strategies for facilitating and increasing meaningful parent participation.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Missouri TASH Chapter Meeting
Join Missouri TASH members at this meeting. We will be reviewing our action plan and brainstorming ideas for 2017! All midwestern/regional chapters are encouraged and welcome to join.

Moderators
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
New York Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

9:20am

Critical Research and Equity of Access: The Status of In(ex)clusion in the U.S.
Limited Capacity seats available

Each of the panels  of the symposium presents data that explores the landscape of inclusive education for students with significant disabilities at the macro (national), meso (state), and micro (local schools) levels. The first panel examines longitudinal national trends in placements for students with significant disabilities. The second panel explores district-to-district variation in one state and potential demographic and socioeconomic predictors of such variation. The third panel investigates levels of engagement for students in self-contained and general education settings and the implications of these for access to the general education curriculum. The fourth panel examines the intersection between opportunity to learn and the adoption of boxed curricula developed specifically for students with significant disabilities. Through an analysis of national-, district-, and school- and student-level data, this symposium presents challenges of access to the gateway to equity, but through an analysis of these data, the researchers will engage in a discussion of the implications of using these data for changing systems that increases access to more equitable schooling. 

Objectives:

After this session, participants will be able to:


  1. Describe trends in access to inclusive settings across and within states.



  2. Explain the importance of inclusive education and how it confers lifespan benefits to students with disabilities 


Research Background:

The purpose of this research symposium is to describe current trends, practices, and outcomes associated with inclusive education.

There is a need to increase inclusive practices for students with significant disabilities and to disrupt widespread segregation practices.  This panel will provide input from diverse researchers on present trends and offer recommendations based on these findings.

The research panel will synthesize current practices and research, offering specific implications and recommendations for practitioners, advocates, researchers, and families.


Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director of Research and Programs, Keystone Assessment
JM

Julia M. White

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Friday December 2, 2016 9:20am - 10:10am
Grand F&E 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Developing a New Transition Assessment: Seeking Input to Develop Student Version
Limited Capacity seats available

Few transition assessments exist for secondary-aged students with significant cognitive disabilities (SWSCD), fewer posses ample validity evidence, and most only provide professional and parent versions. Student involvement in transition assessment is critical to identify strengths and needs to develop meaningful annual transition goals. We are developing, with funding from an IES research grant, a new transition assessment titled the Transition Assessment and Goal Generator - Alternate (TAGG-A). It will have student, family, and professional versions. The constructs derived from research identified student behaviors associated with and predictive of student post-school outcomes will be presented. To help establish the social validity of the TAGG-A Student Version, participants will be asked to engage in a discussion to help design the student version. After this session participations will (1) Identify 5 behavior constructs associated with and/or predictive of post-high school outcomes; (2) Explain 4 major steps involved in developing a new transition assessment (3) Describe social validity and its role in developing transition assessments; and (4) List 3 methods to facilitate student involvement in completing a student transition assessment

Speakers
avatar for Amber McConnell

Amber McConnell

Research Associate, Zarrow Center


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Wabash Cannonball 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Increasing active responding during academic instruction for students with autism spectrum disorder and limited vocal communication
Limited Capacity seats available

Increasingly students with autism, including those with limited vocal communication, are taught in group instructional arrangements. Yet, within both inclusive and specialized settings students with autism often remain passive participants expected to observe instruction with occasional opportunities to participate or practice. This study compared the effects of two types of group instruction, sequential turn taking and response cards, on opportunities to respond, off-task behavior, academic related vocalizations, and skill acquisition of five elementary students with autism spectrum disorder. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) define active responding and describe its impact on learning b) define and compare sequential turn taking and response card instruction c) list the steps of response card instruction d) describe ways these group instructional arrangements can be embedded into inclusive academic instruction c)

Speakers
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Intelligence Magnified Through Communication, Inclusion, and Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will provide participants with information about the Wellspring Guild, a not-for-profit organization, that envisions a future where all people are presumed competent and seen as valued contributing citizens exercising their right to communicate. Communication is essential to citizenship and community participation. The mission of Wellspring Guild is to train and certify practitioners employing a uniformed standard of practice to ensure for all a meaningful voice that is personal, authentic, and effective. After this session participants will be able to; a) explain presumption of competence and that everyone has the desire and ability to express themselves and direct their own lives. b) define evidence based practice in relationship to AAC, movement differences, inclusive schools, and inclusive communities. c) summarize the importance of a total communication approach and that all people are entitled to a robust communication system which allows for full effective expression, and self-advocacy. d) define Wellspring Guild's professional standards and conduct which include, use of informed consent, promotion of respectful collaboration with professionals of other disciplines and deliverance of culturally and age appropriate supports and services.

Speakers
avatar for Harvey Lavoy

Harvey Lavoy

Director Communication Training & Resources, Community Developmental Services


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Missouri Pacific 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Involvement of Transition-Age Students with Severe Disabilities in Their Health Care at School
Limited Capacity seats available

This research presentation will begin with a brief introduction on the strengths and characteristics of students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs, and a description of policy statements and recommended best practices specific to teaching transition-age students involvement in their health care at school as self-care and self-determination skills. Next, the presenter will describe the objectives of the study to be discussed with session participants, which were (a) to understand how transition-age students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs are involved in their specialized health care procedures at school; (b) to understand school personnelŸ??s and familiesŸ?? beliefs about student involvement in their specialized health care procedures at school; and (c) how school personnel and families perceive the importance of student involvement in health care in relation to transition planning. Next the researcher will describe the participants, which were 9 secondary students and their respective special education teachers, school nurses, parents, and classroom nurses or paraprofessionals. Data collection included observations, interviews, demographic questionnaires, and document reviews. Findings and implications for research and practice will then be discussed. Key findings included limited student involvement in their specialized health care procedures at school. Adult participants all reported that they viewed student involvement in their health care as important self-determination skills that could lead to improved health advocacy and community participation in studentŸ??s adult lives. However, adult participants were unsure how to teach self-care and self-determination within the context of specialized health care procedures for students with significant intellectual, physical, and communication disabilities. Implications for research and practice will be discussed in relation to transition planning for this population. Towards the latter part of the the session, participants will be encouraged to share their personal experiences and ideas to brainstorm ways students can learn self-determination in their health care at school, as well as, at home and in the community. This research session proposal aligns to the TASH theme Ÿ??Gateway to EquityŸ? because it addresses a population with complex support needs that has been found to have diminished opportunities to learn autonomy and self-determination in their health care. Health care may be done to them and their bodies, without dignity and the opportunity to exercise control or learn independence. The right to learn to take an active role in maintaining and advocating for oneŸ??s health is a basic right necessary for Ÿ??living a fair, just, and balanced life.Ÿ? By the end of the session, participants will be able to: a) Define the strengths, characteristics, and transition needs of students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs. b) Summarize the role of student involvement in specialized health care procedures in relation to self-determination and health advocacy for students with severe disabilities and complex health care needs. c) Discuss strategies to promote improved adult outcomes for students with severe disabilities and complex health care need through instruction in self-care and self-determination in health care.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Station Master Room Union Station Hotel St. Louis

10:20am

Issues in Healthcare Decision-making Issues in Healthcare Decision-making with People with Intellectual and Developmental DisabilitiesIssues in Healthcare Decision-making with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilitieswith People with Intelle
Limited Capacity seats available

Health-Care Decision-Making with People with IDD provides a Gateway to Equity for people with IDD. This presentation discusses issues and answers as per a national workgroup of AUCD. Providers and advocates must support best practice and innovation in supported health-care decision making to enhance self-advocacy for oneŸ??s own health. Details and dilemmas about health-case decision-making will be presented for discussion. a) Understand supported decision making model. b) Identify at least two ways to engage in helping to make making better decision with (rather than for) people with IDD. c) Identify issues related to end of life decisions for people with IDD. a) Understand supported decision making model. b) Identify at least two ways to engage in helping to make making better decision with (rather than for) people with IDD. c) Identify issues related to end of life decisions for people with IDD.a) Understand supported decision making model. b) Identify at least two ways to engage in helping to make making better decision with (rather than for) people with IDD. c) Identify issues related to end of life decisions for people with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Palmer

Susan Palmer

University of Kansas


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Illinois Central 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

10:20am

Kids Have the Right to Learn
Limited Capacity seats available

We will be talking about how we received a proper education as children with Cerebral Palsy. Teachers and experts continue to think that children with CP have a limited ability to learn. We will explain what our parents did to get the education that we deserved. These days parents have the same problems as we had in the 70's and 80's which is totally unfair for children now. We want parents to be armed with knowledge how to stand up for their children's future. Their future starts with the education that will make them to be successful in life. Without the education, where will these children be when they grow up? We hope most of them will have a college degree and will be contributing to society as we are. 1. Learn ways to get your child the education that they deserve. 2. Learn tips that our parents used to get us the education we deserved. 3. See the outcome that our parents fought for.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lenart

Chris Lenart

Disability Awar