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Each year, the TASH Conference strengthens the disability field by connecting attendees to innovative information and resources, facilitating connections between stakeholders within the disability movement, and helping attendees reignite their passion for an inclusive world. This year’s conference theme, “Gateway to Equity,” explores inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs, in living a fair, just, and balanced life. Return to TASH website.

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Friday, December 2 • 10:20am - 11:10am
Increasing active responding during academic instruction for students with autism spectrum disorder and limited vocal communication LIMITED

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Limited Capacity seats available

Increasingly students with autism, including those with limited vocal communication, are taught in group instructional arrangements. Yet, within both inclusive and specialized settings students with autism often remain passive participants expected to observe instruction with occasional opportunities to participate or practice. This study compared the effects of two types of group instruction, sequential turn taking and response cards, on opportunities to respond, off-task behavior, academic related vocalizations, and skill acquisition of five elementary students with autism spectrum disorder. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) define active responding and describe its impact on learning b) define and compare sequential turn taking and response card instruction c) list the steps of response card instruction d) describe ways these group instructional arrangements can be embedded into inclusive academic instruction c)

Speakers
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.


Friday December 2, 2016 10:20am - 11:10am
Regency C 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103